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Stefan Kehrein

Bio: Stefan Kehrein is an academic researcher from University of Göttingen. The author has contributed to research in topics: Kondo model & Hamiltonian (quantum mechanics). The author has an hindex of 30, co-authored 117 publications receiving 3520 citations. Previous affiliations of Stefan Kehrein include Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich & Heidelberg University.


Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: It is shown that the equilibrium quantum phase transition and the dynamical phase transition in the transverse-field Ising model are intimately related.
Abstract: A phase transition indicates a sudden change in the properties of a large system. For temperature-driven phase transitions this is related to nonanalytic behavior of the free energy density at the critical temperature: The knowledge of the free energy density in one phase is insufficient to predict the properties of the other phase. In this Letter we show that a close analogue of this behavior can occur in the real time evolution of quantum systems, namely nonanalytic behavior at a critical time. We denote such behavior a dynamical phase transition and explore its properties in the transverse-field Ising model. Specifically, we show that the equilibrium quantum phase transition and the dynamical phase transition in this model are intimately related.

663 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This work studies a Hubbard model with a sudden interaction quench, that is, the interaction is switched on at time t=0, to study the real time dynamics for weak interaction U in a systematic expansion and finds three clearly separated time regimes.
Abstract: Motivated by recent experiments in ultracold atomic gases that explore the nonequilibrium dynamics of interacting quantum many-body systems, we investigate the opposite limit of Landau's Fermi-liquid paradigm: We study a Hubbard model with a sudden interaction quench, that is, the interaction is switched on at time $t=0$. Using the flow equation method, we are able to study the real time dynamics for weak interaction $U$ in a systematic expansion and find three clearly separated time regimes: (i) An initial buildup of correlations where the quasiparticles are formed. (ii) An intermediate quasi--steady regime resembling a zero temperature Fermi liquid with a nonequilibrium quasiparticle distribution function. (iii) The long-time limit described by a quantum Boltzmann equation leading to thermalization of the momentum distribution function with a temperature $T\ensuremath{\propto}U$.

379 citations

Book
07 Jul 2006
TL;DR: In this paper, the Hamiltonian is transformed into a Hamiltonian for the evaluation of Observables and Interacting Many-Body Systems (OBS) in the context of many-body systems.
Abstract: Transformation of the Hamiltonian.- Evaluation of Observables.- Interacting Many-Body Systems.- Modern Developments.

262 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors consider quantum quenches in an integrable quantum chain with tuneable-integrability-breaking interactions and demonstrate that at intermediate times after the quench local observables relax to a prethermalized regime, which can be described as a deformation of a generalized Gibbs ensemble.
Abstract: We consider quantum quenches in an integrable quantum chain with tuneable-integrability-breaking interactions. In the case where these interactions are weak, we demonstrate that at intermediate times after the quench local observables relax to a prethermalized regime, which can be described by a density matrix that can be viewed as a deformation of a generalized Gibbs ensemble. We present explicit expressions for the approximately conserved charges characterizing this ensemble. We do not find evidence for a crossover from the prethermalized to a thermalized regime on the time scales accessible to us. Increasing the integrability-breaking interactions leads to a behavior that is compatible with eventual thermalization.

149 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
Stefan Kehrein1
TL;DR: A perturbative scaling picture that naturally contains both equilibrium coherence and nonequilibrium decoherence effects is developed and establishes a large regime dominated by single-channel Kondo physics for asymmetrically coupled quantum dots.
Abstract: We study the Kondo effect in quantum dots in an out-of-equilibrium state due to an applied dc-voltage bias. Using the method of infinitesimal unitary transformations ("flow equations"), we develop a perturbative scaling picture that naturally contains both equilibrium coherence and nonequilibrium decoherence effects. This framework allows one to study the competition between Kondo effect and current-induced decoherence, and it establishes a large regime dominated by single-channel Kondo physics for asymmetrically coupled quantum dots.

108 citations


Cited by
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Proceedings Article
14 Jul 1996
TL;DR: The striking signature of Bose condensation was the sudden appearance of a bimodal velocity distribution below the critical temperature of ~2µK.
Abstract: Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) has been observed in a dilute gas of sodium atoms. A Bose-Einstein condensate consists of a macroscopic population of the ground state of the system, and is a coherent state of matter. In an ideal gas, this phase transition is purely quantum-statistical. The study of BEC in weakly interacting systems which can be controlled and observed with precision holds the promise of revealing new macroscopic quantum phenomena that can be understood from first principles.

3,530 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the properties of entanglement in many-body systems are reviewed and both bipartite and multipartite entanglements are considered, and the zero and finite temperature properties of entangled states in interacting spin, fermion and boson model systems are discussed.
Abstract: Recent interest in aspects common to quantum information and condensed matter has prompted a flurry of activity at the border of these disciplines that were far distant until a few years ago. Numerous interesting questions have been addressed so far. Here an important part of this field, the properties of the entanglement in many-body systems, are reviewed. The zero and finite temperature properties of entanglement in interacting spin, fermion, and boson model systems are discussed. Both bipartite and multipartite entanglement will be considered. In equilibrium entanglement is shown tightly connected to the characteristics of the phase diagram. The behavior of entanglement can be related, via certain witnesses, to thermodynamic quantities thus offering interesting possibilities for an experimental test. Out of equilibrium entangled states are generated and manipulated by means of many-body Hamiltonians.

3,096 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, an alternative formulation of quantum mechanics in which the mathematical axiom of Hermiticity (transpose + complex conjugate) is replaced by the physically transparent condition of space?time reflection ( ) symmetry.
Abstract: The Hamiltonian H specifies the energy levels and time evolution of a quantum theory. A standard axiom of quantum mechanics requires that H be Hermitian because Hermiticity guarantees that the energy spectrum is real and that time evolution is unitary (probability-preserving). This paper describes an alternative formulation of quantum mechanics in which the mathematical axiom of Hermiticity (transpose +complex conjugate) is replaced by the physically transparent condition of space?time reflection ( ) symmetry. If H has an unbroken symmetry, then the spectrum is real. Examples of -symmetric non-Hermitian quantum-mechanical Hamiltonians are and . Amazingly, the energy levels of these Hamiltonians are all real and positive!Does a -symmetric Hamiltonian H specify a physical quantum theory in which the norms of states are positive and time evolution is unitary? The answer is that if H has an unbroken symmetry, then it has another symmetry represented by a linear operator . In terms of , one can construct a time-independent inner product with a positive-definite norm. Thus, -symmetric Hamiltonians describe a new class of complex quantum theories having positive probabilities and unitary time evolution.The Lee model provides an excellent example of a -symmetric Hamiltonian. The renormalized Lee-model Hamiltonian has a negative-norm 'ghost' state because renormalization causes the Hamiltonian to become non-Hermitian. For the past 50 years there have been many attempts to find a physical interpretation for the ghost, but all such attempts failed. The correct interpretation of the ghost is simply that the non-Hermitian Lee-model Hamiltonian is -symmetric. The operator for the Lee model is calculated exactly and in closed form and the ghost is shown to be a physical state having a positive norm. The ideas of symmetry are illustrated by using many quantum-mechanical and quantum-field-theoretic models.

2,647 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors give an overview of recent theoretical and experimental progress in the area of nonequilibrium dynamics of isolated quantum systems, particularly focusing on quantum quenches: the temporal evolution following a sudden or slow change of the coupling constants of the system Hamiltonian.
Abstract: This Colloquium gives an overview of recent theoretical and experimental progress in the area of nonequilibrium dynamics of isolated quantum systems There is particularly a focus on quantum quenches: the temporal evolution following a sudden or slow change of the coupling constants of the system Hamiltonian Several aspects of the slow dynamics in driven systems are discussed and the universality of such dynamics in gapless systems with specific focus on dynamics near continuous quantum phase transitions is emphasized Recent progress on understanding thermalization in closed systems through the eigenstate thermalization hypothesis is also reviewed and relaxation in integrable systems is discussed Finally key experiments probing quantum dynamics in cold atom systems are overviewed and put into the context of our current theoretical understanding

2,340 citations