scispace - formally typeset
Search or ask a question
Author

Stephen Cerrone

Bio: Stephen Cerrone is an academic researcher from JPMorgan Chase. The author has contributed to research in topics: Organizational effectiveness & Job performance. The author has an hindex of 1, co-authored 1 publications receiving 356 citations.

Papers
More filters
Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors viewed turnover as a key predictor in determining unit-level unit-levy performance and used it as a predictor of the unit level performance of employees.
Abstract: Most turnover research positions employee turnover as the dependent variable and focuses on identifying its antecedents. In this study, we viewed turnover as a key predictor in determining unit-lev...

375 citations


Cited by
More filters
Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors examined the effects of three dimensions of HR systems (skillsenhancing, motivationenhancing and opportunity-enhancing) on the ability-motivation-opportunity model.
Abstract: Drawing on the ability-motivation-opportunity model, this meta-analysis examined the effects of three dimensions of HR systems—skills-enhancing, motivation-enhancing, and opportunity-enhancing—on p...

1,624 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, a meta-analysis was conducted to examine the influence of psychological contract breach on 8 work-related outcomes, including actual turnover, attitude, commitment, and in-role performance.
Abstract: A meta-analysis was conducted to examine the influence of psychological contract breach on 8 work-related outcomes. Breach was related to all outcomes except actual turnover. Based on affective events theory, we developed a causal model integrating breach, affect (violation and mistrust), attitude (job satisfaction, organizational commitment, and turnover intentions), and individual effectiveness (actual turnover, organizational citizenship behavior, and in-role performance). Structural equation modeling was used to test the model. The results indicated that affect mediates the effect of breach on attitude and individual effectiveness. Two moderators were also examined including the type of breach measure (global vs. composite) and the content of the psychological contract breach (transactional vs. relational). Theoretical and practical implications of the results are discussed.

1,331 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, a multilevel model connecting micro, intermediate, and macro levels of scholarship is proposed for the conceptualization of the human capital resource, which is created from the emergence of individuals' knowledge, skills, abilities, or other characteristics.
Abstract: This article offers a new approach to the conceptualization of the human capital resource by developing a multilevel model connecting micro, intermediate, and macro levels of scholarship. We define human capital as a unit-level resource that is created from the emergence of individuals' knowledge, skills, abilities, or other characteristics. The model provides new insights into how strategically valuable human capital resources have their origins in the psychological attributes of individuals and are transformed through unit-level processes.

908 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors evaluate the current state of the field of voluntary employee turnover in the past decade as well as new managerial approaches to employee retention, labor market dynamism, and evolution in research methodology and technology.
Abstract: Given the extensive research on the topic of voluntary employee turnover in the past decade as well as new managerial approaches to employee retention, labor market dynamism, and evolution in research methodology and technology, it is important that researchers evaluate the current state of the field. In

849 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, a meta-analysis of 239 effect sizes derived from 65 studies reveals that HRM bundles have significantly larger magnitudes of effects than their constituent individual practices, are positively related to business outcomes, and display effect sizes that are comparable to or larger than those of high-performance work systems.
Abstract: Human resource management bundles consisting of multiple complementary practices are typically considered superior to individual best practices in influencing firm performance. This study investigates the relationship between three such bundles (empowerment, motivation, and skill-enhancing) and business outcomes (retention, operating performance, financial performance, and overall performance ratings). A meta-analysis of 239 effect sizes derived from 65 studies reveals that HRM bundles have significantly larger magnitudes of effects than their constituent individual practices, are positively related to business outcomes, and display effect sizes that are comparable to or larger than those of high-performance work systems. These findings reaffirm the case for firm-level investments in synergistic HRM combinations and highlight the importance of investing in complementary practices. © 2009 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

602 citations