scispace - formally typeset
Search or ask a question
Author

Stephen Larkin

Bio: Stephen Larkin is an academic researcher from University of Queensland. The author has contributed to research in topics: Computer science & Organic Rankine cycle. The author has an hindex of 1, co-authored 1 publications receiving 3 citations.

Papers
More filters
Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Aesthetic appeal plays an important role in acceptance and uptake of AT, and designers and manufacturers should be encouraged to provide appealing options as the study has shown consumers prefer aesthetically appealing grab rails.
Abstract: Background: This pilot study aimed to understand the importance of assistive technology (AT) aesthetics on the intention to purchase, using grab rails as the example. Furthermore, the study explored the economic value consumers placed on aesthetic appeal.

6 citations

DOI
23 Mar 2023
TL;DR: In this article , an RF harvester along with a power conditioning unit is presented, and the proposed solution is tuned to work at 2.42 GHz, and its performance at different frequencies is analyzed.
Abstract: In this paper, an RF harvester along with a power conditioning unit is presented. The proposed solution is tuned to work at 2.42 GHz. RF harvested front-end is simulated, and its supporting back-end power conditioning unit is discussed in detail. The variation in the harvester's Gain, Directivity and Efficiency at different frequencies is analyzed. Different power conditioning units are proposed, and the best one for the proposed RF harvester is discussed in detail. The proposed low-cost solution is highly suitable for far-field RF power harvesting, especially for small portable gadgets.
Proceedings ArticleDOI
07 Mar 2023
TL;DR: In this paper , an off-grid energy Wi-Fi mesh system for remote areas is proposed, and the system is self-powered, and to ensure 24 hours energy production, a hybrid solution of vertical wind turbine and the solar cell is used.
Abstract: To transmit information from a source to a destination without interruption from electromagnetic interference, a strong wireless network connection is required. These wireless networks may be powered by direct current from a battery or a direct source. The challenge arises when a wireless network is installed at a remote location. In this paper, an off-grid energy Wi-Fi mesh system for remote areas is proposed. The system is self-powered, and to ensure 24 hours energy production, a hybrid solution of vertical wind turbine and the solar cell is used. Dedicated routers are designed using Raspberry Pi, and other supporting electronic circuitry and results are analyzed. To avoid bandwidth issues, the network offloading concept is exploited using a novel concept of power used by each node. The proposed system is portable and suitable for remote areas where grid-connected energy availability is an issue.
Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article , a smart, IoT-enabled, solar-based datalogger, which can measure AC and DC voltage and current of solar panel accurately is presented, and the results demonstrate that sensed values give maximum accuracy compared to manually tested values.
Abstract: In this manuscript, a smart, IoT-enabled, solar-based datalogger, which can measure AC and DC voltage and current of solar panel accurately is presented. Combination of stand-alone current and voltage sensors are used to measure to develop the datalogger. The datalogger can measure the current non-invasively, without introducing disturbance to the circuit under test. The PCB is fabricated, and measurements have been made to evaluate the system's performance. The results demonstrate that sensed values give maximum accuracy compared to manually tested values. The main purpose of the study is to measure the electrical parameters of solar panels to achieve maximum accuracy, reducing the error rate, thus causing a reduction in electricity bills, and accessing the data remotely. The system can send data to the cloud so that a remote user can check the data through a web-application.

Cited by
More filters
Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The aesthetics of assistive devices was observed as an important factor that influences the adoption or abandonment of the device, and designers should consider aesthetics in addition to functionality in order to avoid the perceived stigma, thereby reducing the chances of device abandonment.
Abstract: Purpose: The aim of this study was to identify factors that influence the perceived stigma of two assistive devices for visual impairment, namely the white cane and smart glasses.Method: Face-to-face semi-structured interviews with eight European students were conducted to probe their experiences and knowledge related to disability, assistive technology, visual impairment, as well as handheld and wearable devices.Results: Close relationships with disabled people seems to have a positive influence on participants perceptions about stigma, disability, and assistive technology. Academic background seems to not have any influence. The aesthetics of assistive devices was observed as an important factor that influences the adoption or abandonment of the device.Conclusion: Device without negative symbolism but with modern aesthetics (smart glasses) were positively accepted by the participants than the device with traditional aesthetics and symbolisms of visual impairment (white cane). Designers should, therefore, consider aesthetics in addition to functionality in order to avoid the perceived stigma, thereby reducing the chances of device abandonment.IMPLICATIONS FOR REHABILITATIONUnderstanding the factors that influence the perceived stigma associated with assistive technology can help designers and developers to reduce assistive technology abandonment and perceived stigma.Designers need to consider both functionality and aesthetics. While functionality is crucial for the users' adaptation, aesthetics is important for the users' positive perceptions.

22 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Comprehensive consumer-researcher partnerships may not be common-place in health-related occupational therapy research in the Australian Occupational Therapy Journal because of a lack of consumer engagement.
Abstract: Introduction Consumer engagement in research is becoming an ethical, political, and moral imperative. The aim of this scoping review was to provide a snapshot of the current status of the emerging area of consumer engagement in occupational therapy health-related research, as published in the Australian Occupational Therapy Journal. Methods A scoping review was conducted of all health-related original research published in the Australian Occupational Therapy Journal for 5½ years, plus Early View, as at June 2019. Eligible papers were examined for consumer engagement content which included any active choice or control by consumers, beyond being a research participant. A recognised six stage methodology was used with quantitative and qualitative data analysed. Two consumers collaborated in interpreting the data including finalising themes, leading theme naming, developing key discussion points, and producing recommendations. Results Of the 123 eligible papers, 48 (39.02%) included consumer engagement. However, only two incorporated consumer engagement across all research phases-preparation, execution and translation. A total of 103 consumer engagement activities were charted and categorised across all papers. There were limited instances of consumer collaboration (14/103, 13.59%) or consumer-led research processes (15/103, 14.56%) reported. Four themes emerged: Parity in research partnerships; It's important to know the Who, What, When, How and So What of consumer involvement; Consumer engagement must be a two-way process-not a dead end street; and Meeting the challenge-being diverse and inclusive. Conclusion Comprehensive consumer-researcher partnerships may not be common-place in health-related occupational therapy research in the Australian Occupational Therapy Journal. This paper is a call to action. Occupational therapists must embrace consumer research partnerships as a demonstration of the key philosophies of enabling and empowering consumers and communities. Collaboration with two consumers in finalising data analysis, results interpretation and reporting added a diverse and valuable perspective.

11 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: There is a discrepancy between an 'ideal' discourse regarding the involvement of older persons throughout the design process and actual practice, and Manifestations of ageism, errors and biases of designing DT with older persons.
Abstract: BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES Involving older persons in the design process of digital technology (DT) promotes the development of technologies that are appealing, beneficial and used. However, negative discourse on aging and ageism are potential underlying factors that could influence which and how DTs are designed and how older persons are involved in the design process. This scoping review investigates the explicit and implicit manifestations of ageism in the design process of DT. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Seven databases were screened for studies reporting on design of DT with older persons between January 2015 until January 2020. Data regarding study and DT characteristics, discourse about older persons and their involvement in the design process was extracted, coded, and analyzed using critical discourse analysis. RESULTS 60 articles met the inclusion criteria and were included in the analysis. Various forms of exclusion of older persons from the design process were identified, such as no or low involvement, upper-age limits and sample biases toward relatively 'active', healthy and 'tech-savvy' older persons. Critical discourse analysis revealed use of outdated language, stereotypical categorizations and/or design decisions based on ageism in 71.7% of the studies. DISCUSSION AND IMPLICATIONS A discrepancy was found between an 'ideal' discourse regarding the involvement of older persons throughout the design process and actual practice. Manifestations of ageism, errors and biases of designing DT with older persons are discussed. This paper calls for more authentic inclusion of older persons and higher awareness toward the implications of ageism in the design process of DT.

7 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The MPC developed in this study reflects the perspectives of various stakeholders in occupational therapy practice, providing helpful information for students to prepare themselves, and could contribute to expanding and developing the scope of professionalism in occupational Therapy, especially in AT service.
Abstract: Professionalism is a critical attribute that occupational therapy students must establish throughout education, especially in the context of assistive technology (AT). This study aimed to construct a multidimensional perspectives checklist (MPC) from the stakeholders to reflect professionalism development in the AT service courses. Fifteen experts in AT clinical practice and educators (N = 15) consented to and completed three rounds of the Delphi survey. Data were qualitatively analyzed to form a preliminary checklist in the first round. In rounds two and three, participants rated their level of agreement with the MPC items. A descriptive analysis of consensus was performed. Thirty items were classified into five subscales (teachers, therapists, patients, peers, learners) and fit into a framework with three dimensions and seven categories. After the Delphi survey, the MPC achieved high consensus, convergence, and stability. Two additional categories of professionalism emerged in the study, namely aesthetic and personal characteristics and reflection. The MPC developed in this study reflects the perspectives of various stakeholders in occupational therapy practice, providing helpful information for students to prepare themselves. Therefore, the MPC could contribute to expanding and developing the scope of professionalism in occupational therapy, especially in AT service.