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Stephen Marshall

Other affiliations: Victoria University, Australia
Bio: Stephen Marshall is an academic researcher from Victoria University of Wellington. The author has contributed to research in topics: Higher education & E-learning maturity model. The author has an hindex of 22, co-authored 60 publications receiving 1390 citations. Previous affiliations of Stephen Marshall include Victoria University, Australia.


Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This paper describes a novel application of short-message-services (SMS) for large-class interactivity, and assesses its impact on the learning experiences of 1200 students in a large undergraduate class.
Abstract: Classroom interaCtivity has a number of significant benefits: it promotes an active learning environment, provides valuable feedback for lecturers, increases student motivation, and enables a learning community. 6 On the other hand, interactive activities for large classes (over 100 students) have proven to be quite difficult and, often, inefficient. 3 During the past six years the rapid proliferation of mobile devices, particularly cellular phones, has presented an opportunity to develop new interactive classroom systems which have the potential to enhance students' learning experience. The present challenge for researchers is to go beyond anecdotal perceptions and obtain empirical evidence about the impact of these technologies in the classroom. This paper describes a novel application of short-message-services (SMS) for large-class interactivity, and assesses its impact on the learning experiences of 1200 students in a large undergraduate class. The traditional lecture theatre environment has provided universities with a cost effective and scaleable means of teaching students. However, this has come at the price of making interaction difficult and inefficient, leading to reduced student engagement, motivation and learning. 3 Classroom Feedback Systems (CFS) provide one possible technological mechanism that can efficiently enable interaction in large classes. Known by various names (e.g., " clickers ") and produced commercially by a range of vendors , CFS technologies have been used since the sixties to allow students to respond to questions and have the results processed and displayed for use by the lecturer and the class as a whole. The more sophisticated CFSs provide the ability to answer a range of question types, from simple yes/no through to detailed responses, free-form questions and role-playing. Current platforms range from small infra-red units, through radio units, to the use of Web systems accessed by wireless personal digital assistants (PDAs) or laptops. These systems are generally well regarded by students when they are used. Numerous case studies have described the use of CFS technologies in disciplines ranging from the physical sciences through mathematics, accountancy and literature. A variety of positive outcomes from the use of CFS technologies have been reported including improved understanding of important concepts, 6, 7 increased student engagement and participation, 3, 7 improved quality of discussion in the classroom 7 and improved teacher awareness of student difficulties. 7 A clearer perception of their students' current level of understanding allows instructors to adjust their teaching appropriately. However, CFSs are not a panacea. Using CFS technology without specific pedagogical …

138 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This paper explored student attitudes, perceptions and understandings of intellectual property, particularly plagiarism and copyright, and explore potential differences between NESB and ESB (English speaking background) students, finding that while NESB students are more likely have engaged in plagiarism than ESB students, plagiarism overall is very common and reflects a combination of disrespect for material from the Internet and significant confusion about what actually constitutes plagiarism.
Abstract: Concern about plagiarism by students from non-English speaking backgrounds (NESB) has grown apace with the increased numbers of international students attending western institutions. We present an exploration of student attitudes, perceptions and understandings of intellectual property, particularly plagiarism and copyright, and explore potential differences between NESB and ESB (English speaking background) students. The results indicate that while NESB students are more likely have engaged in plagiarism than ESB students, plagiarism overall is very common and reflects a combination of disrespect for material from the Internet and significant confusion about what actually constitutes plagiarism.

104 citations

Proceedings Article
01 Jan 2004
TL;DR: The Capability Maturity Model and SPICE approach to software process improvement has resulted in a robust system for improving development process capability in the field of software engineering as mentioned in this paper, which can be applied in the area of e-learning in order to explore whether similar insights could be generated for institutions engaged in online delivery of teaching.
Abstract: The Capability Maturity Model and SPICE approach to software process improvement has resulted in a robust system for improving development process capability in the field of software engineering. We apply these same ideas in the area of e-learning in order to explore whether similar insights could be generated for institutions engaged in online delivery of teaching. In order to test this idea, a set of potential process areas are presented, based on a well known set of e-learning benchmarks and a trial analysis of a project is conducted. We suggest that this model offers a means for institutions to identify systemic weaknesses in their e-learning development, delivery and management that potentially can inform future resourcing and strategic priorities.

98 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors argue that university culture and existing capability constrain such innovation and to a large extent determine the nature and extent of organisational change and that in the absence of strong leadership, technologies are simply used as vehicles to enable changes that are already intended or which reinforce the current identity.
Abstract: Technology and change are so closely related that the use of the word innovation seems synonymous with technology in many contexts, including that of higher education. This paper contends that university culture and existing capability constrain such innovation and to a large extent determine the nature and extent of organisational change. In the absence of strong leadership, technologies are simply used as vehicles to enable changes that are already intended or which reinforce the current identity. These contentions are supported by evidence from e-learning benchmarking activities carried out over the past five years in universities in the United States, the United Kingdom, Australia and New Zealand. Keywords: organisational change; e-learning maturity model DOI: 10.1080/09687769.2010.529107

90 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors argue that university culture and existing capability constrain such innovation and to a large extent determine the nature and extent of organizational change, and that in the absence of strong leadership, technologies are simply used as vehicles to enable changes that are already intended or which reinforce the current identity.
Abstract: Technology and change are so closely related that the use of the word innovation seems synonymous with technology in many contexts, including that of higher education. This paper contends that university culture and existing capability constrain such innovation and to a large extent determine the nature and extent of organizational change. In the absence of strong leadership, technologies are simply used as vehicles to enable changes that are already intended or which reinforce the current identity. These contentions are supported by evidence from e-learning benchmarking activities carried out over the past five years in universities in the United States, the United Kingdom, Australia and New Zealand.

71 citations


Cited by
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Journal Article
TL;DR: A detailed review of the education sector in Australia as in the data provided by the 2006 edition of the OECD's annual publication, 'Education at a Glance' is presented in this paper.
Abstract: A detailed review of the education sector in Australia as in the data provided by the 2006 edition of the OECD's annual publication, 'Education at a Glance' is presented. While the data has shown that in almost all OECD countries educational attainment levels are on the rise, with countries showing impressive gains in university qualifications, it also reveals that a large of share of young people still do not complete secondary school, which remains a baseline for successful entry into the labour market.

2,141 citations

01 Jan 2008
TL;DR: In this article, the authors argue that rational actors make their organizations increasingly similar as they try to change them, and describe three isomorphic processes-coercive, mimetic, and normative.
Abstract: What makes organizations so similar? We contend that the engine of rationalization and bureaucratization has moved from the competitive marketplace to the state and the professions. Once a set of organizations emerges as a field, a paradox arises: rational actors make their organizations increasingly similar as they try to change them. We describe three isomorphic processes-coercive, mimetic, and normative—leading to this outcome. We then specify hypotheses about the impact of resource centralization and dependency, goal ambiguity and technical uncertainty, and professionalization and structuration on isomorphic change. Finally, we suggest implications for theories of organizations and social change.

2,134 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: E-Moderators are the new generation of teachers and trainers who work with learners online as mentioned in this paper using Computer-Mediated Conferencing (CMC) as a learning tool, regardless of the subject they are teaching.
Abstract: E-Moderators are \"the new generation of teachers and trainers who work with learners online\" (p. viii) using Computer-Mediated Conferencing (CMC) as a learning tool, regardless of the subject they are teaching. They are the focus of E-Moderating, a recent book which provides both a theoretical framework for developing online learning using CMC (part one), and a wealth of practical advice (part two). The book is supported by a Web site. The author, Gilly Salmon, a distance education specialist with the Open University Business School in the UK, provides a five-step model of effective online education, along with copious examples of how the model relates to real-life online learning contexts. Salmon proposes that, by basing learning on a constructivist model, it is e-moderators that can make the difference in online education as they convene, direct, summarize, and archive synchronous and asynchronous discussions.

1,055 citations

01 Jan 2008
TL;DR: By J. Biggs and C. Tang, Maidenhead, England; Open University Press, 2007.
Abstract: by J. Biggs and C. Tang, Maidenhead, England, Open University Press, 2007, 360 pp., £29.99, ISBN-13: 978-0-335-22126-4

938 citations