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Stephen P. Meyer

Other affiliations: Wilfrid Laurier University
Bio: Stephen P. Meyer is an academic researcher from Laurentian University. The author has contributed to research in topics: Health care & Metropolitan area. The author has an hindex of 11, co-authored 22 publications receiving 258 citations. Previous affiliations of Stephen P. Meyer include Wilfrid Laurier University.

Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors examined all directional commuting flows for all areas of Canada (at the census subdivision level) and emphasize the commuting patterns and employment opportunities inherent to the rural component of the population.

36 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors consider the pattern of international foreign acquisitions, for the year 1993, from a simultanous country, and find that place-specific attributes are most important to foreign direct investors.
Abstract: To better understand what place‐specific attributes are most important to foreign direct investors, we consider the pattern of international foreign acquisitions, for the year 1993, from a simultan...

30 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors conducted nearest neighbor and spatial autocorrelation analyses to statistically confirm the concentrating tendencies of head offices in Toronto, Montreal, Calgary and Vancouver and found that head offices operating within these four metropolitan areas show collective distinctiveness in where controlled subsidiaries are located internationally and in what industrial activity is emphasized.
Abstract: Despite recent dispersal trends, headquarters activity remains disproportionately present in identifiable clusters within large North American metropolitan areas. Through nearest neighbor and spatial autocorrelation analyses, we statistically confirm the concentrating tendencies of head offices in Toronto, Montreal, Calgary and Vancouver. It is also established that head offices operating within these four metropolitan areas show collective distinctiveness in where controlled subsidiaries are located internationally and in what industrial activity is emphasized. Finally, we evaluate (via Spearman r and Kruskal-Wallis H tests) which socioeconomic census variables are linked with head office districts in Toronto and Calgary. It is suggested that head office districts will feature a relative absence of families, high-density housing, and short-distance commuting. While head office areas in Toronto, a headquarters center at the top of the Canadian hierarchy, resonate prosperity, Calgary features head office d...

27 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This study's identification of subtle spatial imbalances appends the literature by more precisely qualifying the typically reported 'urban-rich, rural-poor' assessment of health care service condition and reinforces the need for policy-makers to appraise health care spatial accessibility differentials as a function of both CM and CAM endowment.

24 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This study details the spatial patterns of health care supply in the Canadian province of Ontario and shows that certain municipalities (especially in Ontario's southwest and south-central regions) specialize in CAM and the most outstanding spatial feature is an ‘81 municipality CAM cluster’ that represents arguably the pinnacle of CAM activity in the province.
Abstract: Shortages of family physicians, specialists and other personnel working within the realm of conventional medicine (CM) concern citizens in many regions and municipalities in Canada. Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) approaches (such as chiropractic, holistic, homeopathic, naturopathic, massage and acupuncture) are increasingly used in conjunction with, or in some cases as replacements for, conventional medicine. Thus, to get an idea of ‘total’ health care supply in a jurisdiction and to draw comparisons between locations, it is useful to understand the spatial tendencies of both CM and CAM offices. With the use of a sample that contains the location, employment and sales of 4,955 CAM and 8,709 CM offices, this study details the spatial patterns of health care supply in the Canadian province of Ontario. The analysis comprises three main parts. First, the geographic tendencies of CAM and CM office activity are revealed in per capita terms and while regional differences are detectable, the main contrast is that CAM displays a much more even distribution across the urban-rural continuum in comparison to CM. Second, through the use of location quotients and a local spatial autocorrelation analysis, it is shown that certain municipalities (especially in Ontario's southwest and south-central regions) specialize in CAM and the most outstanding spatial feature is an ‘81 municipality CAM cluster’ that represents arguably the pinnacle of CAM activity in the province. CM specialization is rarer and is biased towards the more populated municipalities. Third, a Spearman's correlation analysis suggests that CAM and CM health care supply are associated with community well-being indictors and urban density measures.

20 citations


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28 Nov 2003
TL;DR: In this article, the authors show that the spatial organization of production and employment of multinational enterprises (MNEs) and the stage of its internationalization process influences employment in both home and host countries.
Abstract: textMultinational enterprises (MNEs) are often held responsible for the ‘relocation of production’ and ‘exporting jobs’ to, often low-wage, countries at the expense of domestic jobs. Additionally, host country governments – in particular in developing countries - often perceive international production by MNEs as the panacea for generating employment and economic growth. What is the spatial organization of production and employment of MNEs? What are the employment effects of changes in the geography of international strategy? Have MNEs increasingly integrated production across borders with a regional division of labor and, what are the employment effects?This thesis demonstrates that the geography of a MNE’s internationalization strategy as well as the stage of its internationalization process influences employment in both home and host countries. Competition among workers within macro regions in industrialized countries (e.g. the EU) and among low wage countries or regions is often greater than between high and low wage countries. The employment effects of internationalizing firms are often intertwined with processes of regional integration as well as with the herding and strategic behavior of MNEs.

144 citations

Posted Content
TL;DR: In this article, the authors re-examine the rationale for public policy and conclude that the prevailing public knowledge model is evolving towards a networked or distributed model of knowledge production and use in which public and private institutions play complementary roles.
Abstract: This book re-examines the rationale for public policy, concluding that the prevailing ‘public knowledge' model is evolving towards a networked or distributed model of knowledge production and use in which public and private institutions play complementary roles. It provides a set of tools and models to assess the impact of the new network model of funding and governance, and argues that governments need to adapt their funding and administrative priorities and procedures to support the emergence and healthy growth of research networks. The book goes on to explain that interdependencies and complementarities in the production and distribution of knowledge require a new and more contextual, flexible and complex approach to government funding, monitoring and assessment.

112 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Bramwell et al. as discussed by the authors presented research findings on the information and communication technology (ICT) cluster in Waterloo, Ontario and found that many inter-firm linkages in the Waterloo ICT cluster are non-local, and that extrafirm institutional supports such as the local university and industry association are critical in sustaining and strengthening the cluster.
Abstract: Bramwell A., Nelles J. and Wolfe D. A. Knowledge, innovation and institutions: global and local dimensions of the ICT cluster in Waterloo, Canada, Regional Studies. This paper presents research findings on the information and communication technology (ICT) cluster in Waterloo, Ontario. Cluster dynamics in Canada do not conform to some of the key assumptions in the literature on clusters that emphasize the importance of local intra-cluster dynamics based on inter-firm linkages at the local level. The results of this case study indicate that many inter-firm linkages in the Waterloo ICT cluster are non-local, and that extra-firm institutional supports, such as the local university and industry association, are critical in sustaining and strengthening the cluster. Knowledge-based cluster theories that emphasize the role of local and global knowledge flows and learning processes, and the interaction effect of civic capital and local institutions in supporting the development of a local ‘learning economy’, prov...

105 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This article presents the first review and synthesis of research findings on CAM use and practice in rural communities and illustrates the substantial prevalence and complexity of CAM use in rural regions.
Abstract: Contexts: The consumption of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) in rural areas is a significant contemporary health care issue An understanding of CAM use in rural health can provide a new perspective on health beliefs and practice as well as on some of the core service delivery issues facing rural health care generally Purpose: This article presents the first review and synthesis of research findings on CAM use and practice in rural communities Methods: A comprehensive search of literature from 1998 to 2010 in CINAHL, MEDLINE, AMED, and CSA Illumina (social sciences) was conducted The search was confined to peer-reviewed articles published in English reporting empirical research findings on the use or practice of CAM in rural settings Findings: Research findings are grouped and examined according to 3 key themes: "prevalence of CAM use and practice,""user profile and trends of CAM consumption," and "potential drivers and barriers to CAM use and practice" Conclusions: Evidence from recent research illustrates the substantial prevalence and complexity of CAM use in rural regions A number of potential gaps in our understanding of CAM use and practice in rural settings are also identified

104 citations