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Steven Lewis

Bio: Steven Lewis is an academic researcher from Deakin University. The author has contributed to research in topics: Expansion tunnel & Education policy. The author has an hindex of 21, co-authored 76 publications receiving 1199 citations. Previous affiliations of Steven Lewis include Australian Department of Defence & University of Queensland.

Papers published on a yearly basis

Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Peck et al. as discussed by the authors defined fast policy as a policymaking condition coproduced by intensified and instantaneous connectivity between actors and institutions in varying scales, across places, in this neoliberalization era.
Abstract: The idea of fast policy regimes, first appearing in Jamie Peck’s 2002 article published in no other than this journal, has been influential in shaping the agenda of the emergent research of policy mobility studies for more than a decade. Now, in the first research monograph on fast policy regimes (and also likely the first in policy mobility studies), Jamie Peck and Nik Theodore have drawn on their individual, as well as collective, research since the late 1990s to offer a more expanded consideration of this salient global phenomenon. In their conceptualization, fast policy is a policymaking condition coproduced by intensified and instantaneous connectivity between actors and institutions in varying scales, across places, in this neoliberalization era. Continuous interreferencing and experimenting in high velocity and frequency is what sets fast policy apart from other forms of policy mobility in history. While many contemporary neoliberal schemes exhibit these characteristics, the authors in this book specifically interrogate the policy-making conditions of two policy models: conditional cash transfer (CCT) and participatory budget (PB). Students of critical policy research will likely appreciate how Peck and Theodore begin the book with an extensive and incisive discussion over the epistemology, methodology, and research methods guiding their work; these fundamental components of research have not received enough consideration in critical policy studies. In the introduction and part I, the authors reject the policy transfer tradition that narrowly attributes policy movement to rational technological diffusion. Rather, they assert a social constructivist reading of policy movements as “continuous and often contradictory process-cum-practices of translation” (p. xxvii), encompassing mutations situated in nonleaner circulations, contextualization, embedding, and dis-embedding across different geographic sites and scales. The associated methodological challenges that come with expanded reformulation, namely following policies through complex social landscapes across multiple sites, are addressed with adapting the extended case method. This approach informs the interviews and constructive engagement Peck and Theodore conducted when focusing on policy networks and following moving policy ideas at the elite level. Extended case method also dovetails with the choice of two policies that shared structural conditions (e.g., strongly promoted by influential international organizations such as the World Bank) but yielded divergent outcomes in different places. In addition, the Global South origin of the two cases offers an opportunity to examine the less understood South–South and South–North policy movements. Part II of the book illustrates this approach through discussing the policy-making conditions surrounding the rapidly expanding CCT model. It starts with the Opportunity NYC experiment under New York City’s Bloomberg administration, which was modeled on the Oportunidades CCT program in Mexico, the poster child of the World Bank’s neoliberal approach to poverty alleviation by incentivizing work and human capital–building. Despite deliberate designs to make Opportunity NYC accommodate New York’s own context, the program’s mixed results failed to lift Bloomberg’s reputation and brought it to a quick end. Yet, this setback did not undermine the status of Oportunidade as an exemplary social policy model with plenty BO O K R EV EW

195 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The PISA-based Test for Schools (PISA for Schools) as mentioned in this paper was introduced by the OECD to enable comparisons between school-to-schooling system comparisons and create commensurate spaces of comparison and governance, enabling the organization to reach into school-level spaces and directly influence local educational practices.
Abstract: This article examines the OECD’s new PISA-based Test for Schools (“PISA for Schools”) program. PISA for Schools is part of the expanding education work of the OECD, building upon main PISA to enable school-to-schooling system comparisons. We examine the development of PISA for Schools, the nature of the instrument, and some initial effects of its introduction. Our theoretical framework focuses on new spatialities associated with globalization and the emergence of topological rationalities and heterarchical modes of governance. We analyze 33 interviews with personnel at the OECD and relevant edu-businesses, not-for-profit organizations, and philanthropic foundations. Pertinent documents and web-based media are also analyzed. We suggest that PISA for Schools provides an exemplary demonstration of heterarchical governance, in which vertical policy mechanisms open up horizontal spaces for new policy actors. It also creates commensurate spaces of comparison and governance, enabling the OECD to “reach into” school-level spaces and directly influence local educational practices.

91 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors examine the methodological issues pertaining to the study of the movement of policy and conclude that the methodologies of policy mobility are inexorably intertwined with the changing phenomena under examination, and hence require what Lury and Wakeford describe as "inventive methods".
Abstract: The argument of this paper is that new methodologies associated with the emerging field of ‘policy mobilities’ can be applied, and are in fact required, to examine and research the networked and relational, or ‘topological’, nature of globalised education policy, which cuts across the new spaces of policymaking and new modes of global educational governance. In this paper, we examine the methodological issues pertaining to the study of the movement of policy. Informed by contemporary methodological thinking around social network analysis and the ethnographic notion of ‘following the policy’, we discuss the limitations of these approaches to adequately address presence in policy network analysis, and the problem of representing speed and intensity of policy mobility, even while these attempt to solve the problem of relationality and territoriality. We conclude that the methodologies of policy mobility are inexorably intertwined with the (constantly) changing phenomena under examination, and hence require what Lury and Wakeford describe as ‘inventive methods’.

79 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors argue that PISA for Schools discursively positions participating schools as somehow being commensurable with successful schooling systems, eliding any sense that certain cultural and historical factors (or "out of school" factors) are inexorably linked to student performance.
Abstract: This paper explores Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) for Schools, a local variant of the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD’s) influential PISA that not only assesses an individual school’s performance in reading, mathematics and science against international schooling systems, but also promotes 17 identical examples of ‘best practice’ from ‘world class’ schooling systems (eg Shanghai-China, Singapore) Informed by 33 semi-structured interviews with actors across the PISA for Schools policy cycle, and supplemented by the analysis of relevant documents, the paper provides an account of how these concrete examples of best practice are represented in the report received by participating schools Drawing upon thinking around processes of commensuration and the notion of ‘governing by examples’, the paper argues that PISA for Schools discursively positions participating schools as somehow being commensurable with successful schooling systems, eliding any sense that certain cultural and historical factors – or ‘out of school’ factors – are inexorably linked to student performance Beyond encouraging the problematic school-level borrowing of policies and practices from contextually distinct schooling systems, I argue that this positions the OECD as both the global expert on education policy and now, with PISA for Schools, the local expert on ‘what works’

71 citations


Cited by
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TL;DR: In this paper, Imagined communities: Reflections on the origin and spread of nationalism are discussed. And the history of European ideas: Vol. 21, No. 5, pp. 721-722.

13,842 citations

01 Jan 2016
TL;DR: The the practice of everyday life is universally compatible with any devices to read and is available in the digital library an online access to it is set as public so you can download it instantly.
Abstract: Thank you very much for downloading the practice of everyday life. Maybe you have knowledge that, people have look hundreds times for their chosen novels like this the practice of everyday life, but end up in harmful downloads. Rather than reading a good book with a cup of coffee in the afternoon, instead they are facing with some malicious bugs inside their desktop computer. the practice of everyday life is available in our digital library an online access to it is set as public so you can download it instantly. Our books collection spans in multiple locations, allowing you to get the most less latency time to download any of our books like this one. Kindly say, the the practice of everyday life is universally compatible with any devices to read.

2,932 citations

01 Aug 2001
TL;DR: The study of distributed systems which bring to life the vision of ubiquitous computing systems, also known as ambient intelligence, is concentrated on in this work.
Abstract: With digital equipment becoming increasingly networked, either on wired or wireless networks, for personal and professional use alike, distributed software systems have become a crucial element in information and communications technologies. The study of these systems forms the core of the ARLES' work, which is specifically concerned with defining new system software architectures, based on the use of emerging networking technologies. In this context, we concentrate on the study of distributed systems which bring to life the vision of ubiquitous computing systems, also known as ambient intelligence.

2,774 citations

01 Jan 2002
TL;DR: In this article, the Schumpeterian Competition State and the Workfare State are discussed, with a focus on the role of social reproduction and the workfare state in the two types of states.
Abstract: List of Boxes. List of Tables and Figure. Preface. Abbreviations. Introduction. 1. Capitalism and the Capitalist Type of State. 2. The Keynesian Welfare National State. 3. The Schumpeterian Competition State. 4. Social Reproduction and the Workfare State. 5. The Political Economy of State Rescaling. 6. From Mixed Economy to Metagovernance. 7. Towards Schumpeterian Workfare Postnational Regimes?. Notes. References. Index.

1,224 citations

Posted Content
TL;DR: New State Spaces as discussed by the authors is a mature and sophisticated analysis of broad interdisciplinary interest, making this a highly significant contribution to the subject of political geographies of the modern state, which has been made in the past few years.
Abstract: Neil Brenner has in the past few years made a major impact on the ways in which we understand the changing political geographies of the modern state Simultaneously analyzing the restructuring of urban governance and the transformation of national states under globalizing capitalism, 'New State Spaces' is a mature and sophisticated analysis of broad interdisciplinary interest, making this a highly significant contribution to the subject

951 citations