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Steven Ward Guest

Bio: Steven Ward Guest is an academic researcher. The author has contributed to research in topics: Focus (computing). The author has an hindex of 1, co-authored 1 publications receiving 48 citations.

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16 Sep 2009
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors argue that the covenant relationship formula (CRF) as expressed in Deuteronomy 26:16-19 (~[;l.li... ~yhil{ale ^l. tAyh.li ) serves as a focal point which defines, unifies and bears the weight of the covenantal framework of the book of DEUTERONOMY.
Abstract: DEUTERONOMY 26:16-19 AS THE CENTRAL FOCUS OF THE COVENANTAL FRAMEWORK OF DEUTERONOMY Steven Ward Guest, Ph.D. The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, 2009 Chairperson: Dr. Russell T. Fuller This dissertation maintains that the covenant relationship formula (CRF) as expressed in Deuteronomy 26:16-19 (~[;l. Al tAyh.li . . . ~yhil{ale ^l. tAyh.li) serves as a focal point which defines, unifies and bears the weight of the covenantal framework of the book of Deuteronomy. Chapter 1 reviews previous assertions that Deuteronomy is patterned after ancient Near Eastern treaties, highlights the conclusions of Rendtorff regarding the CRF, and identifies the translation difficulties in 26:16-19. Chapter 2 critiques the proposals of von Rad, Kline, Kitchen, and Wenham who suggest that Deuteronomy follows the pattern of the ancient Near Eastern treaties. An alternate schema for the covenantal framework of Deuteronomy 1-30 is proffered. Finally, an excursus addressing the Mosaic authorship of Deuteronomy 27 is included. Chapter 3 proposes that the Hiphil of rma in verses 17 and 18 is functioning causatively and utilizes dual direct objects in the sentence construction. Grammatical and syntactical features of the text of 26:16-19 are observed. Theological concerns on the translational renderings of 26:17-19 are posed. A proposed conceptual model of the sequence of events that may underlie the text of Deuteronomy 26:17-19 is offered. Chapter 4 considers the canonical context of Deuteronomy 26. A chart demonstrates the literary-structural unity of the three ceremonies of confession (26:1-11; 26:12-15; and 26:16-19). Further analysis, however, reveals that 26:16-19, while integrally connected to the other ceremonies, functions also on the macro level within the greater covenantal framework of Deuteronomy. Chapter 5 examines each of the expressions of the CRF (4:20; 7:6; 14:2; 27:9; 28:9; and 29:12) as they occur in the covenantal framework of Deuteronomy. An analysis of the function of the CRF reveals that prior to its expression in the focal text (26:16-19) it is associated with the notion of exclusive loyalty to Yahweh and after the focal text it is associated with the expectation of obedience to Yahweh. Chapter 6 summarizes the work of chapters 1 and 2 then applies the findings of chapters 3 through 5 to demonstrate that the CRF (Al tAyh.li . . . ~yhil{ale ^l. tAyh.li ~[;l. ) as expressed in 26:16-19 with its concomitant covenantal obligations can bear the weight of and does indeed serve as the keystone of the covenantal framework of Deuteronomy. The covenantal exchange in 26:17-19 connects the emphasis on obedience in 26:17 to that of the covenant relationship formula in 27:9; 28:9; and 29:12 and connects the emphasis on exclusive loyalty in 26:18-19 to that of the covenant relationship formula in 4:20; 7:6; and 14:2.

48 citations


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72 citations

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TL;DR: Weinfeld as discussed by the authors presents Deuteronomy 1-11 in a groundbreaking new translation, with a comprehensive introduction and thorough commentary by world-renowned Israeli biblical scholar Moshe Weinfeld.
Abstract: Deuteronomy 1-11 is here presented in a groundbreaking new translation, with a comprehensive introduction and thorough commentary by world-renowned Israeli biblical scholar Moshe Weinfeld. The "second law," Deuteronomy portrays Moses as the founder and great lawgiver of Israel. In a series of addresses, Moses reviews his life and the life of God's people. He reminds them of the guiding hand of God, which has brought them thus far along the way, and will bring their Exodus and Wanderings to a triumphal conclusion in the Holy Land. Through a beautiful translation and insightful comments in this first of two volumes on Deuteronomy, Weinfeld reinvigorates the basic laws of society with their life-giving power: the Shema ("Hear O Israel, the Lord is our God, the Lord is One") and the Great Commandment ("You shall love the Lord your God with all your heart, and with all your soul, and with all your might"). These laws govern Israelite religious and communal life under God's guidance

50 citations

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TL;DR: Gorman as discussed by the authors argued that "to be in Christ' is to live within a community that is shaped by his story, not merely to have a 'personal relationship' with Christ".
Abstract: death-resurrection pattern of the master story. Romans 6:3-8 affirms that the experience now of newness of life will find its logical conclusion in the experience of resurrection to eternal life in the future. The cruciform life is depicted as life in community, and this always involves corporate and even political relationships. \"To be in Christ' is to live within a community that is shaped by his story, not merely to have a 'personal relationship' with Christ\" (p. 350). Gorman acknowledges that the church living as God's avant garde of the new creation at times was a threat over against the Greco-Roman culture.

33 citations

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30 citations

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16 May 2014
TL;DR: Greever and Schreiner as discussed by the authors argued that the new covenant was a significant soteriological, ecclesiological, and ethical category in Paul's theology using Ephesians as a test case.
Abstract: THE NEW COVENANT IN EPHESIANS Joshua Matthew Greever, Ph.D. The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, 2014 Chair: Dr. Thomas R. Schreiner This dissertation maintains that the new covenant was a significant soteriological, ecclesiological, and ethical category in Paul’s theology. Using Ephesians as a test case, it analyzes the relevant texts where Paul seems to appropriate the Old Testament’s promises specifically linked with the new covenant. Chapter 1 surveys and assesses various views on the significance of the new covenant to Paul, and offers a way forward in the debate. Chapter 2 surveys the new covenant in the Old Testament. Included is exegesis of the most relevant prophetic texts that point to a day when God would usher in a new covenant with his people. A summary of these texts shows a list of major themes most often associated with the new covenant. Chapter 3 analyzes the blessings of the new covenant in Ephesians 1:3-14. Themes such as election, sonship, forgiveness of sins, and the Spirit indicate the prevalence of the new covenant’s promises in Pauline thought. These promises are rooted in the promises to Abraham. Chapter 4 analyzes the new covenant in Ephesians 2:11-22. Paul frames the plight, solution, and new status of the Gentiles in covenantal terms. Peace with God and one another through the death of Christ is at the center of the text and is especially rooted in the promises of Isaiah. The new status for believing Gentiles includes membership within the true people of God, who, fulfilling the covenant ideal in Christ, dwells with his people. Chapter 5 suggests that some of the ethical commands of Ephesians 4:17-5:5 find their background in the ethic of the new covenant. Speaking the truth in love and walking in love summarize the ethic of the new covenant. Included in this chapter is an excursus on the structural similarities between Deuteronomy and Ephesians, which indicates the covenantal framework of Paul’s ethics. Chapter 6 summarizes the thesis by comparing the nature of the new covenant in chapter 3 with the findings of chapters 3-5. That many of the promises of the new covenant are found to be present in various texts in Ephesians suggests the prevalence of the concept to Paul as he formulated his soteriology, ecclesiology, and ethics. These conclusions are then set within the context of the broader scholarly discussion concerning Paul’s view of the new covenant.

26 citations