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Sung Un Kim

Bio: Sung Un Kim is an academic researcher from The Catholic University of America. The author has contributed to research in topics: Social media & Health education. The author has an hindex of 3, co-authored 5 publications receiving 64 citations.

Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: There should be efforts to reflect new technology tools, apply mixed methods and increase the engagement level of collaboration to evolve this research domain, this study suggests.
Abstract: Objective This study aims to examine trends in studies of teens’ health information behaviour. Methods Eighty-two articles published between 2000 and 2012 were selected and analysed in various aspects: health topics by year, information sources, data collection methods, use of theories and models, collaborative and interdisciplinary efforts and published journals. Results Fifty-seven per cent of the studies focused on specific health topics, such as sexual health, while the rest covered general health topics. Almost half of the studies examined how teens search for and use health information on the Internet. Surveys were the most popular data collection technique. Only 12.2% were based on a theory or model. About 42% were conducted collaboratively by authors from multiple disciplines. Discussion and Conclusions With the increasing attention to specific health topics and online resources, the health information behaviour of teens has been examined more frequently since the mid-2000s. Its interdisciplinary nature was evidently shown from various disciplines that the authors were affiliated with and the journals of the published studies represented. This study suggests that there should be efforts to reflect new technology tools, apply mixed methods and increase the engagement level of collaboration to evolve this research domain.

30 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: It was found that college students are willing to read and post health-related information on Facebook when the health topic is not sensitive and most user factors, except gender, have no influence on health information activities.
Abstract: College students tend to lack access to health information. Because social networking sites (SNSs) are popularly adopted by college students, SNSs are considered to be good media channels for college students to obtain health-related information. This study examines the factors that influence college students' health information-seeking and -sharing activities on Facebook. An online survey was distributed to college students between the ages of 18 and 29 to determine intentions pertaining to health information activities according to the factors identified for the study. The factors included both contextual factors (such as health topic sensitivity and health information sources) as well as user factors (such as demographics). Our findings showed that college students are willing to read and post health-related information on Facebook when the health topic is not sensitive. In addition, there are clear differences in preferences between professional sources and personal sources as health information sources. It was found that most user factors, except gender, have no influence on health information activities. The impacts of SNS contexts, awareness of information sources, types of interlocutors, and privacy concerns are further discussed.

26 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
01 Nov 2013
TL;DR: It was found that the more young adults trust information sources, the more likely they are to be involved in information activities, and the potential of Facebook as a good information channel, especially for health professionals and governmental organizations.
Abstract: Within the context of SNSs, particularly Facebook, this study aims to understand how young adults perceive the credibility of various information sources, how their information activities differ by those information sources, and how young adults' perception of credibility impacts their information activities. The results of an online survey demonstrated that young adults consider medical/health organizations and government agencies the most credible and friends the least credible for health issues. As for information activities, although young adults' intents to read postings were significantly greater than those to post questions or answers, intents of information activities were generally lower than neutral. Nevertheless, it was found that the more young adults trust information sources, the more likely they are to be involved in information activities. The results showed the potential of Facebook as a good information channel, especially for health professionals and governmental organizations.

12 citations

Journal Article
TL;DR: Critical factors influencing students' perceptions of health information on a social networking site is demonstrated and provides implications for healthcare marketers and health educators.
Abstract: Introduction. This study examines ways in which college students perceive the credibility and usefulness of health information on Facebook, depending on topic sensitivity, information source and demographic factors. Method. With self-selection sampling, data were collected from two universities through an online survey; 351 responses were used for analysis. Analysis. The data were analysed using analysis of variance and t-tests. Results. Overall, college students tend to consider health information with low sensitivity levels as significantly more credible and useful than health information with high sensitivity levels on Facebook. Regardless of topic sensitivity, college students tend to consider professional information sources as more credible and useful than non-professional information sources on Facebook. However, among non-professional information sources, they prefer an experienced person over family when it comes to serious health issues. Female students tend to trust highly sensitive health information more than male students. Students living in campus residence halls are less likely to consider health information on Facebook as credible or useful. The more students are educated, the more credible or useful they consider professional information sources. Conclusions. This study demonstrates critical factors influencing students' perceptions of health information on a social networking site and provides implications for healthcare marketers and health educators.

8 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the most popular health topics identified by adolescents in their study were nutrition, diseases, depression, relationships, sexual intercourse and alcohol, and significant gender differences were found in adolescents' needs, perceptions and sources of health information.
Abstract: Background Understanding the health information needs of adolescents is the first step towards providing them with relevant information to aid them in their decision making regarding health issues. Objective The goal of this study is to assess adolescents' needs, perceptions and sources of health information. Methods Four hundred sixty-nine high school students in Osijek, Croatia, participated in this study by answering a questionnaire. The collected data were analysed using basic frequency and non-parametric statistical methods. Results The most popular health topics identified by adolescents in our study were nutrition, diseases, depression, relationships, sexual intercourse and alcohol. Adolescents consider their parents the most reliable personal source of health information (72.0%), while they perceive the Internet as the main non-personal source of health information (29.8%). Adolescents wish to get more education about health issues at school (54.4%). Significant gender differences were found in adolescents' needs, perceptions and sources of health information. Conclusions It is important to provide adolescents with systematic institutional health education and improve health advisory services and library/information services to assist adolescents in locating health information and resolving their health related questions.

4 citations


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Journal Article
TL;DR: The review of literature presents the conclusions of several meta-analyses that have reviewed psychosocial interventions for late-life depression and anxiety, and intervention studies concerning the effectiveness of cognitive behavioral therapy, interpersonal therapy, reminiscence therapy, and alternative therapies with depressed and/or anxious older adults are reviewed.
Abstract: Depression and anxiety are the most common psychiatric conditions in late life. Despite their prevalence, we know relatively little about their unique manifestation in older adults. And, Although the most common intervention for late-life depression and anxiety continues to be medication, research on psychosocial interventions for late-life depression and anxiety has burgeoned in the past several years. Unfortunately, this growing body of intervention research has yet to be widely translated into improved systems of care for late-life depression. This article is one step toward synthesizing the knowledge in this growing area of research. The review of literature presents the conclusions of several meta-analyses that have reviewed psychosocial interventions for late-life depression and anxiety. In addition, intervention studies concerning the effectiveness of cognitive behavioral therapy, interpersonal therapy, reminiscence therapy, and alternative therapies with depressed and/or anxious older adults are reviewed. A brief description of various approaches to psychosocial intervention with anxious and/or depressed older adults is also presented.

728 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Three of the main tasks facing this issue concern: (1) the detection of opinion spam in review sites, (2) the Detection of fake news and spam in microblogging, and (3) the credibility assessment of online health information.
Abstract: In the Social Web scenario, where large amounts of User Generated Content diffuse through Social Media, the risk of running into misinformation is not negligible For this reason, assessing and mining the credibility of both sources of information and information itself constitute nowadays a fundamental issue Credibility, also referred as believability, is a quality perceived by individuals, who are not always able to discern with their cognitive capacities genuine information from the fake one For this reason, in the recent years several approaches have been proposed to automatically assess credibility in Social Media Most of them are based on data-driven models, ie, they employ machine-learning techniques to identify misinformation, but recently also model-driven approaches are emerging, as well as graph-based approaches focusing on credibility propagation Since multiple social applications have been developed for different aims and in different contexts, several solutions have been considered to address the issue of credibility assessment in Social Media Three of the main tasks facing this issue and considered in this article concern: (1) the detection of opinion spam in review sites, (2) the detection of fake news and spam in microblogging, and (3) the credibility assessment of online health information Despite the high number of interesting solutions proposed in the literature to tackle the above three tasks, some issues remain unsolved; they mainly concern both the absence of predefined benchmarks and gold standard datasets, and the difficulty of collecting and mining large amount of data, which has not yet received the attention it deserves For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website

159 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This primer identifies several key considerations that should aid health researchers in the planning and execution of qualitative studies involving content analysis of text data from Facebook users and their activity on Facebook.
Abstract: As Facebook continues to grow its number of active users, the potential to harness data generated by Facebook users also grows. As much of Facebook users’ activity consists of creating (and commenting on) written posts, the potential use of text data for research is enormous. However, conducting a content analysis of text from Facebook users requires adaptation of research methods used for more traditional sources of qualitative data. Furthermore, best practice guidelines to assist researchers interested in conducting qualitative studies using data derived from Facebook are lacking. The purpose of this primer was to identify opportunities, as well as potential pitfalls, of conducting qualitative research with Facebook users and their activity on Facebook and provide potential options to address each of these issues. We begin with an overview of information obtained from a literature review of 23 studies published between 2011 and 2018 and our own research experience to summarize current approaches to conducting qualitative health research using data obtained from Facebook users. We then identify potential strategies to address limitations related to current approaches and propose 5 key considerations for the collection, organization, and analysis of text data from Facebook. Finally, we consider ethical issues around the use and protection of Facebook data obtained from research participants. In this primer, we have identified several key considerations that should aid health researchers in the planning and execution of qualitative studies involving content analysis of text data from Facebook users.

78 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: It is suggested willingness to read more comments and negative emotions as two mediating factors between exposure to uncivil/civil disagreeing comments and attitude polarization.
Abstract: This study examined whether and how (in)civility and the presence of supporting evidence in disagreeing comments influence individuals' attitude polarization. The study used a 2 (civility vs. incivility) × 2 (evidence vs. no evidence) factorial design involving reading dissimilar viewpoints in Facebook comments. The results showed that exposure to uncivil opposing comments, compared to exposure to civil disagreeing comments, led to lower levels of willingness to read more comments and greater levels of negative emotions and attitude polarization. However, the presence or absence of supporting evidence in comments did not have any significant effect on the outcome variables. The findings suggest that it is the civility or incivility of information that influences whether exposure to dissimilar perspectives either mitigates or reinforces individuals’ attitude polarization. This study also suggested willingness to read more comments and negative emotions as two mediating factors between exposure to uncivil/civil disagreeing comments and attitude polarization.

58 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Findings from the pilot implementation of the proposed multicomponent, multiyear bullying educational program indicate the need to incorporate the program into additional nursing courses beginning during the sophomore year of the nursing curricula
Abstract: Bullying is a known and ongoing problem against nurses. Interventions are needed to prepare nursing students to prevent and mitigate the bullying they will experience in their nursing practice. The purpose of this article is to describe the development process and utility of one such intervention for use by nursing faculty with nursing students prior to their students’ entry into the profession. The educational program was critiqued by an advisory board and deemed to be relevant, clear, simple, and non-ambiguous indicating the program to have adequate content validity. The program then was pilot tested on five university campuses. Faculty members who implemented the educational program discussed (1) the program having value to faculty members and students, (2) challenges to continued program adoption, and (3) recommendations for program delivery. The proposed multicomponent, multiyear bullying educational program has the potential to positively influence nursing education and ultimately nursing practice. Findings from the pilot implementation of the program indicate the need to incorporate the program into additional nursing courses beginning during the sophomore year of the nursing curricula.

56 citations