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Susan Schreibman

Bio: Susan Schreibman is an academic researcher from Maynooth University. The author has contributed to research in topics: Digital humanities & Digital library. The author has an hindex of 10, co-authored 38 publications receiving 898 citations. Previous affiliations of Susan Schreibman include University of Maryland, College Park & Trinity College, Dublin.

Papers
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Book
03 Mar 2008
TL;DR: This Companion offers a thorough, concise overview of the emerging field of humanities computing and addresses the central concerns shared by those interested in the subject.
Abstract: This Companion offers a thorough, concise overview of the emerging field of humanities computing. Contains 37 original articles written by leaders in the field. Addresses the central concerns shared by those interested in the subject. Major sections focus on the experience of particular disciplines in applying computational methods to research problems; the basic principles of humanities computing; specific applications and methods; and production, dissemination and archiving. Accompanied by a website featuring supplementary materials, standard readings in the field and essays to be included in future editions of the Companion.

422 citations

Reference BookDOI
01 Jan 2007

166 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The Versioning Machine takes advantage of opportunities afforded by electronic publishing, such as providing a frame to compare diplomatic versions of witnesses side by side, allowing for manipulatable images of the witness to be viewed alongside the diplomatic edition, and providing users with an enhanced typology of notes.
Abstract: This article describes the background and architecture of The Versioning Machine, a software tool designed to display and compare multiple versions of texts The display environment provides for features traditionally found in codex-based critical editions, such as annotation and introductory material It also takes advantage of opportunities afforded by electronic publishing, such as providing a frame to compare diplomatic versions of witnesses side by side, allowing for manipulatable images of the witness to be viewed alongside the diplomatic edition, and providing users with an enhanced typology of notes

28 citations


Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors define the parameters that define a posthuman knowing subject, her scientific credibility and ethical accountability, and take the posthumanities as an emergent field of enquiry based on the convergence of convergent theories.
Abstract: What are the parameters that define a posthuman knowing subject, her scientific credibility and ethical accountability? Taking the posthumanities as an emergent field of enquiry based on the conver...

429 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: It is rare to find an academic today who has had no access to digital technology as part of their research activity, but email, Google searches and bibliographic databases are become increasingly crucial, as more of the world libraries are scanned and placed online.
Abstract: Few dispute that digital technology is fundamentally changing the way in which we engage in the research process. Indeed, it is becoming more and more evident that research is increasingly being mediated through digital technology. Many argue that this mediation is slowly beginning to change what it means to undertake research, affecting both the epistemologies and ontologies that underlie a research programme. Of course, this development is variable depending on disciplines and research agendas, with some more reliant on digital technology than others, but it is rare to find an academic today who has had no access to digital technology as part of their research activity. Library catalogues are now probably the minimum way in which an academic can access books and research articles without the use of a computer, but, with card indexes dying a slow and certain death (Baker, 1996, 2001), there remain few outputs for the non-digital scholar to undertake research in the modern university. Email, Google searches and bibliographic databases are become increasingly crucial, as more of the world libraries are scanned and placed online. Whilst some decry the loss of the skills and techniques of older research traditions, others have warmly embraced what has come to be called the digital humanities (Schreibman et al., 2008; Schnapp & Presner, 2009; Presner, 2010; Hayles, 2011).

245 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the vital role of our fingers and hands for the immersive fiction reading experience is discussed. But the focus is on the body and not on the mental process of reading.
Abstract: Reading is a multi-sensory activity, entailing perceptual, cognitive and motor interactions with whatever is being read. With digital technology, reading manifests itself as being extensively multi-sensory – both in more explicit and more complex ways than ever before. In different ways from traditional reading technologies such as the codex, digital technology illustrates how the act of reading is intimately connected with and intricately dependent on the fact that we are both body and mind – a fact carrying important implications for even such an apparently intellectual activity as reading, whether recreational, educational or occupational. This article addresses some important and hitherto neglected issues concerning digital reading, with special emphasis on the vital role of our bodies, and in particular our fingers and hands, for the immersive fiction reading experience.

222 citations

Posted Content
TL;DR: In this article, a broad-scale, comprehensive analysis focusing on how the university and its various stakeholders, most notably faculty, value traditional and emerging forms of scholarly communication is presented.
Abstract: Despite the increase in open access publishing peer-reviewed journals still hold sway in many academic disciplines according to this US study. While many studies have addressed specific issues like the costs of launching academic journals and the finances of university presses, there has not yet been a broad-scale, comprehensive analysis focusing on how the university and its various stakeholders, most notably faculty, value traditional and emerging forms of scholarly communication. The research focuses on understanding faculty needs and practices for in-progress scholarly communication as well as archival publication. Among the goals is providing a broader understanding of the full array of activities related to the scholarly communication lifecycle in order to enable the accurate assessment of the academy’s future communication and publication landscape. The following are among the questions driving the work: • What will scholars in various core disciplines want to do in their research and with their research results, and what new forms of communication do or do not support those needs? • How will scholars want to disseminate and receive input on their work at various stages of the scholarly communication lifecycle? • What are the emerging trends in research and publication practices? • What is the scope and depth of pent-up demand for new models of communication in various sectors/disciplines? • How do institutions and other stakeholders support these faculty needs, if at all? We suggest that more innovation does and will occur first during in-progress communication than in final, archival publication. One can foresee a scenario where useful and effective innovations in in-progress communication may eventually serve to drive improvements in final, archival publication. It is therefore worthwhile to gain deeper insight into the needs, motives, and new capabilities within in-progress communication as well as final, archival publication. We describe here our results based on the responses of 160 interviewees across 45, mostly elite, research institutions in seven selected academic fields: archaeology, astrophysics, biology, economics, history, music, and political science. The report is divided into eight chapters, which include a document synthesizing our methods and research results plus seven detailed disciplinary case studies.

205 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The possibilities of stylo for computational text analysis are introduced, via a number of dummy case studies from English and French literature, to demonstrate how the package is particularly useful in the exploratory statistical analysis of texts, e.g. with respect to authorial writing style.
Abstract: This software paper describes ‘Stylometry with R’ (stylo), a flexible R package for the highlevel analysis of writing style in stylometry. Stylometry (computational stylistics) is concerned with the quantitative study of writing style, e.g. authorship verification, an application which has considerable potential in forensic contexts, as well as historical research. In this paper we introduce the possibilities of stylo for computational text analysis, via a number of dummy case studies from English and French literature. We demonstrate how the package is particularly useful in the exploratory statistical analysis of texts, e.g. with respect to authorial writing style. Because stylo provides an attractive graphical user interface for high-level exploratory analyses, it is especially suited for an audience of novices, without programming skills (e.g. from the Digital Humanities). More experienced users can benefit from our implementation of a series of standard pipelines for text processing, as well as a number of similarity metrics.

192 citations