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T. A. Ezhova

Other affiliations: Russian Academy of Sciences
Bio: T. A. Ezhova is an academic researcher from Moscow State University. The author has contributed to research in topics: Arabidopsis thaliana & Mutant. The author has an hindex of 9, co-authored 59 publications receiving 305 citations. Previous affiliations of T. A. Ezhova include Russian Academy of Sciences.


Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The ICE2 gene has originated from a duplication event about 17.9MYA followed by sub- and neofunctionalization of the ancestral ICE1 gene, and its role in pathogen resistance and flowering time regulation is predicted.

38 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Several Arabidopsis mutants of the ecotype Dijon were isolated that show resistance to the herbicide acifluorfen, which inactivates protoporphyrinogen oxidase (PPOX), an enzyme of tetrapyrrole biosynthesis.
Abstract: Several Arabidopsis mutants of the ecotype Dijon were isolated that show resistance to the herbicide acifluorfen, which inactivates protoporphyrinogen oxidase (PPOX), an enzyme of tetrapyrrole biosynthesis. This enzyme provides protoporphyrin for both Mg chelatase and ferrochelatase at the branchpoint, which leads to chlorophyll and heme, respectively. One of the mutations, aci5-3, displays semidominant inheritance. Heterozygous progeny showed yellow-green leaves, while the homozygous seedlings were white and inviable, but could be rescued by supplementing the medium with sugar. Interestingly, the expression of neither of the two forms of PPOX was altered in the mutant, but the rate of synthesis of 5-aminolevulinate, the precursor of all tetrapyrroles, was drastically reduced. Genetic mapping revealed the mutant locus is closely linked to the ch42 marker, which is itself located in the CHLI-1 gene which codes for one of the three subunits of Mg chelatase. The cs mutant also shows a defect in this gene, and test for allelism with aci5-3 confirmed that the two mutations are allelic. Sequencing of the wild type and aci5-3 alleles of CHLI-1 revealed a single base change (G718A), which results in a D240N substitution in the CHLI-1 protein. In the homozygous aci5-3 mutant no CHLI-1 RNA or protein could be detected. Strikingly, CHLH and CHLI-2 transcripts were also absent. This indicates the existence of a feedback-regulatory mechanism that inactivates the genes encoding certain Mg chelatase subunits. The basis for the semidominant inheritance pattern and the relationship between herbicide resistance and modified gene expression is discussed.

32 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
01 Mar 2007-Planta
TL;DR: Comparison of the amino acid sequence of CHLI 1 and CHLI 2 encoded in the genome of aci5 and wild type revealed alterations of the C-terminal end which are suggested to be responsible for the decreased ability ofCHLI 2 to participate in the formation of the CHLI ring-like structure of the Mg chelatase complex.
Abstract: One of the key regulatory enzymes of the chlorophyll biosynthesis pathway is magnesium (Mg) chelatase, consisting of three different subunits CHLI, CHLD and CHLH. While CHLH and CHLD are encoded by a single gene each in Arabidopsis, CHLI is encoded by two homologous genes, ChlI 1 and ChlI 2. Analysis of the acifluorfen herbicide resistant mutant aci5 revealed an alteration of the ChlI 1 gene. This mutant as well as wild type plants contained similar transcript levels of the ChlI 1 and ChlI 2 genes. Moreover, the transcripts of both alleles of the ChlI 1 gene were present in the cs (ch42-2)/aci5 hybrid which showed an albina phenotype. Comparison of the amino acid sequence of CHLI 1 and CHLI 2 encoded in the genome of aci5 and wild type revealed in particular alterations of the C-terminal end which are suggested to be responsible for the decreased ability of CHLI 2 to participate in the formation of the CHLI ring-like structure of the Mg chelatase complex.

26 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The main approaches have been considered to studying the genetic control of plant cell totipotency in an in vitro culture and the activity of genes that determine and maintain the meristematic state of cells, level of hormones in the cells, and sensitivity to hormones.
Abstract: The main approaches have been considered to studying the genetic control of plant cell totipotency in an in vitro culture. The capacity of cultured plants for callusogenesis, organ formation, and somatic embryogenesis depends on the activity of genes that determine and maintain the meristematic state of cells, level of hormones in the cells, and sensitivity to hormones, as well as on the activity other genes that control different stages of plant morphogenesis.

20 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Studies of inflorescences of the mutants bractea and terminal flower1 and double mutant bra tfl1 of Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh have shown that the presence of a developed leaf in the node preceding the terminal flower is a necessary condition for the formation of theTerminal flower perianth.
Abstract: Studies of inflorescences of the mutants bractea and terminal flower1 and double mutant bra tfl1 of Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. have shown that the presence of a developed leaf in the node preceding the terminal flower is a necessary condition for the formation of the terminal flower perianth. This means that perianth cannot develop in an abracteose inflorescence of terminal flower. The second necessary condition for the terminal flower formation is a sufficient level of expression of the genes responsible for floral morphogenesis. Combination of these two conditions suffices for the development of a terminal flower with perianth. Since the general principles of organization are common for the majority of Angiosperms, it can be stated that if the abracteose inflorescence is terminated by a flower with perianth, this is a consequence of displacement of the lateral flower into the terminal position.

16 citations


Cited by
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Journal Article
Fumio Tajima1
30 Oct 1989-Genomics
TL;DR: It is suggested that the natural selection against large insertion/deletion is so weak that a large amount of variation is maintained in a population.

11,521 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In the seedlings fed with aminolevulinate-dipyridyl in darkness, MgProto levels in the chl1 and chl9 mutants decreased up to 25% and 31% of that in wild-type, respectively, indicating that the Mg-chelatase activity is significantly reduced, causing the eventual decrease in chlorophyll synthesis.
Abstract: Photosynthetic organisms exhibit a green color due to the accumulation of chlorophyll pigments in chloroplasts. Mg-protoporphyrin IX chelatase (Mg-chelatase) comprises three subunits (ChlH, ChlD and ChlI) and catalyzes the insertion of Mg(2+) into protoporphyrin IX, the last common intermediate precursor in both chlorophyll and heme biosyntheses, to produce Mg-protoporphyrin IX (MgProto). Chlorophyll deficiency in higher plants results in chlorina (yellowish-green) phenotype. To date, 10 chlorina (chl) mutants have been isolated in rice, but the corresponding genes have not yet been identified. Rice Chl1 and Chl9 genes were mapped to chromosome 3 and isolated by map-based cloning. A missense mutation occurred in a highly conserved amino acid of ChlD in the chl1 mutant and ChlI in the chl9 mutant. Ultrastructural analyses have revealed that the grana are poorly stacked, resulting in the underdevelopment of chloroplasts. In the seedlings fed with aminolevulinate-dipyridyl in darkness, MgProto levels in the chl1 and chl9 mutants decreased up to 25% and 31% of that in wild-type, respectively, indicating that the Mg-chelatase activity is significantly reduced, causing the eventual decrease in chlorophyll synthesis. Furthermore, Northern blot analysis indicated that the nuclear genes encoding the three subunits of Mg-chelatase and LhcpII in chl1 mutant are expressed about 2-fold higher than those in WT, but are not altered in the chl9 mutant. This result indicates that the ChlD subunit participates in negative feedback regulation of plastid-to-nucleus in the expression of nuclear genes encoding chloroplast proteins, but not the ChlI subunit.

219 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: An overview of tetrapyrrole metabolism in Arabidopsis and other higher plants is presented, and all identified enzymatic steps involved in this metabolism are described.
Abstract: Higher plants produce four classes of tetrapyrroles, namely, chlorophyll (Chl), heme, siroheme, and phytochromobilin. In plants, tetrapyrroles play essential roles in a wide range of biological activities including photosynthesis, respiration and the assimilation of nitrogen/sulfur. All four classes of tetrapyrroles are derived from a common biosynthetic pathway that resides in the plastid. In this article, we present an overview of tetrapyrrole metabolism in Arabidopsis and other higher plants, and we describe all identified enzymatic steps involved in this metabolism. We also summarize recent findings on Chl biosynthesis and Chl breakdown. Recent advances in this field, in particular those on the genetic and biochemical analyses of novel enzymes, prompted us to redraw the tetrapyrrole metabolic pathways. In addition, we also summarize our current understanding on the regulatory mechanisms governing tetrapyrrole metabolism. The interactions of tetrapyrrole biosynthesis and other cellular processes including the plastid-to-nucleus signal transduction are discussed.

212 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
Xiyan Ji1, Mengqi Jiang1, Jibiao Zhang1, Xuyao Jiang1, Zheng Zheng1 
TL;DR: Algae-bacteria consortia and quorum sensing substances (autoinducing peptides and bis (3'-5') diguanylic acid) concentrations were measured and the interactions and communication patterns between Chlorella vulgaris and Bacillus licheniformis were depicted.

176 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The present review attempts to remedy the situation with a simple outline of a classification based on different branching patterns; differential elongation of axes of different orders; and repetition of basic ramification patterns in different ways.
Abstract: Terminology of inflorescence diversity has often been used in a confusing way in the literature, partly because it was based on uncritical and outdated definitions. In particular, the terms cyme, thyrse, and panicle have been misused. Although a more critical classification worked out by several authors is available, it is unfortunately not in general use because most of the relevant publications are written in German. In addition, some terms have not been used in the same way by morphologists and developmental geneticists. The present review attempts to remedy the situation with a simple outline of a classification based on: (i) different branching patterns; (ii) differential elongation of axes of different orders; and (iii) repetition of basic ramification patterns in different ways. Racemose and cymose branching are two extreme patterns; the former with limitation of axial orders to two, the second with limitation of lateral axes of each order to two. In a branching system, a sequence of racemose → cymose and, within the cyme, of dichasial → monochasial is common, but the reverse sequence generally does not occur. Systematic and evolutionary aspects of inflorescences are briefly discussed. Branching patterns are often stable in larger clades. Inflorescences of mutants studied in developmental genetic studies are mainly altered in flower or branch numbers or relative branch length, but not in branching patterns. This is also a contribution towards the goal of a unified terminology for the different fields of biology dealing with inflorescences.

168 citations