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T.E. Stephenson

Bio: T.E. Stephenson is an academic researcher. The author has contributed to research in topics: Glider. The author has an hindex of 1, co-authored 1 publications receiving 3 citations.
Topics: Glider

Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, an investigation of the control and stability characteristics of a tailless aircraft was carried out in flight using a glider under the auspices of the National Research Council of Canada.
Abstract: FOR some years there has been proceeding, under the auspices of the National Research Council of Canada, an investigation of the control and stability characteristics of tailless aircraft. Because of the difficulties inherent in other methods of investigation, the work is being done in flight, using a glider.

3 citations


Cited by
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Proceedings ArticleDOI
01 Jan 2001
TL;DR: In this article, the historical relationships between various classes of all lifting vehicles, which includes the flying wing, all wing, tailless, lifting body, and lifting fuselage, are documented.
Abstract: The present paper has documented the historical relationships between various classes of all lifting vehicles, which includes the flying wing, all wing, tailless, lifting body, and lifting fuselage. The diversity in vehicle focus was to ensure that all vehicle types that map have contributed to or been influenced by the development of the classical flying wing concept was investigated. The paper has provided context and perspective for present and future aircraft design studies that may employ the all lifting vehicle concept. The paper also demonstrated the benefit of developing an understanding of the past in order to obtain the required knowledge to create future concepts with significantly improved aerodynamic performance.

45 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, a series of tests of remotely piloted vehicles (RPV) and full scale aircraft from which most of the performance information and selected dynamic characteristics normally required for aircraft operation can be obtained are described.
Abstract: This paper describes a series of tests of remotely piloted vehicles (RPV) and full scale aircraft from which most of the performance information and selected dynamic characteristics normally required for aircraft operation can be obtained. The main goal of the paper is to compare corresponding characteristics of RPVs and full scale aircraft and establish if RPV testing can help and influence an early stage design project in order to optimise its aerodynamic configuration and predict its static and dynamic characteristics. This paper presents basic similarity transformations, including mass scale, force scale, power scale, linear acceleration scale, Reynolds number scale etc. as functions of linear scale. It was found that tests in steady conditions are difficult to perform, time‐consuming, and do not offer significant advantages over the classical wind tunnel tests. RPV tests in unsteady conditions are much easier to perform and quite accurate.

6 citations

01 Jan 2001
TL;DR: A review of the most recent aircraft design studiesshows a significant number of flying wing concepts are under consideration, especial for military 5applications as discussed by the authors.
Abstract: Richard M. W_x)d and Steven X. S. Bauer:ABSTRACTThe present paper has documented the historicalrelationships between various classes of all liftingvehicles, which includes the flying wing, all wing,tailless, lifting body, and lifting fuselage. Thediversity in vehicle focus was to ensure that allvehicle types that ma) have contributed to or beeninfluenced by the development of the classical fl)ingwing concept was investigated."['he paper has provided context and perspective forpresent and future aircraft design studies that mayemplo_ the all lifting vehicle concept. The paper alsodemonstrated the benefit of developing anunderstanding of the past in order to obtain therequired knowledge to create future concepts withsignificantl2_ improved aerodynamic performance.INTRODUCTIONEven after more than a century of research anddevelopment the flying wing is still viewed as aunique and unconventional aircraft concept _4v. Thisrealit3 is even more surprising when you consider thesignificant aerodynamic and structural benefitsafforded rising wing designs, compared toconventional designs. Historical revie_vs 5__'_5"_7 onthis topic appear to point to a variety of reasons forthe slow acceptance of flying wing type vehicles.From a technical point of view, the dominant issuehas been stability and control, which to this daycontinues to plague this class of vehicle. As a result,flying wing aircraft continue to be limited to missionscomprised of only low lift (cruise) conditions. Inaddition to the technical issues, there were culturalissues faced by this class of aircraft that consisted ofnegative public perceptions and politics. In the firsthalf of the 2() _hcentury, which was the most prolificperiod of flying wing development, these two issuesseverely restricted technical discussions and as aresult the opportunity to mature this concept was lost.The present cultural environment is slightl)improvedbut the public perception and politics continue tohaunt this concept todayA review of the most recent aircraft design studiesshows a significant number of flying wing conceptsare under consideration, especiall_ for militar 5applications. It is clear that the realization of theflying wing concept is benefiting from recenttechnological advances in aerodynamics, floxscontrol, flight control s3stems, materials, structures,and propulsions s_stems. It also appears that thecultural barriers of the past are also deterioratingallowing for the rich body of flying wing research tobe shared and studied and thus, contribute to futurevehicle development activities.However, a review of the ongoing research indicatesthat we continue to re-create the past instead oflearning from the past to create the future _5_. Thesesentiments are clearl 3 stated through the ff)llowingquotes from A. R. Weyl, 1944. -_-_-"-_"...Flying Wing, in which at the present period moreinterest than ever is being displayed.""...it seems a fact that experience collected in the pastwith tailless aeroplanes is either unknown orforgotten or. at the least ill-judged...""...it is by no means sufficient that a crazy designflies: it must fly far better than eveo'thing else inorder to raise attention attlong those closedcircles..."The relevance of these three statements after nearlysix decades its quite remarkable. The_ point to theneed for a thorough understanding of the designtrends, historical contributions, and technicalrelationships for fl3ing wing vehicles as well as otherclosely related vehicle types before significant workis performed. With this understanding will come newSenior Research Aerodynamicist, ConfigurationAerod?namics Branch NASA Langley ResearchCenter, Associate Fellow AIAACopyright ,_, 2001 by the American Institute ofAeronautics and Astronautics. Inc. No copyright isasserted in the United States under Title 17, U. S. Code.The U. S. Government has a royalty-free license toexercise all rights under the copyright claimed herein forgovernment purposes. All other fights are reserved b?the copyright owner.American Institute of Aeronauhcs and Astronautics

1 citations