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Author

T. M. Charles-Edwards

Bio: T. M. Charles-Edwards is an academic researcher from University of Oxford. The author has contributed to research in topics: Irish & Welsh. The author has an hindex of 13, co-authored 23 publications receiving 617 citations.
Topics: Irish, Welsh, Kinship, Legal history, Celtic languages

Papers
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Book
01 Jan 2000
TL;DR: In this article, the authors present a survey of genealogies and king lists of Ireland in the 7th century: a tour of Ireland and the origins and rise of Ui Neill.
Abstract: List of maps List of tables List of figures Acknowledgements Abbreviations A note on pronunciation A note on the Chronicle of Ireland Introduction 1. Ireland in the seventh century: a tour 2. Irish society c.700: I. Communities 3. Irish society c.700: II. Social distinctions and moral values 4. Ireland and Rome 5. Conversion to Christianity 6. The organisation of the early Irish church 7. Columba, Iona and Lindisfarne 8. Columbanus and his disciples 9. The Paschal controversy 10. The primatial claims of Armagh, Kildare and Canterbury 11. The origins and rise of Ui Neill 12. The kingship of Tara 13. The powers of kings 14. Conclusion Appendix: genealogies and king-lists Glossary: Irish and Latin Bibliography Index.

79 citations

Book
01 Jan 1993
TL;DR: In this paper, the structure of Irish kinship, kinship and lordship in Ireland and Wales, and kinsman and neighbour in Ireland, are discussed, as well as the shape of Welsh kinship.
Abstract: List of maps List of genealogical tables Note on terminology Part I. Irish Kinship: The structure of Irish kinship Irish ruling kindreds Part II. Welsh Kinship: The shape of Welsh kinship The Gwely and the Gafael Part III. Claims to Land by Virtue of Kinship: Irish Tellach Welsh Dadannudd Part IV. Kin and Lord The half-free in Ireland Irish clientship Kinship and lordship in Wales Part V. Kinsman and Neighbour: Kinship and neighbourhood in Ireland Kinship and neighbourhood in Wales Conclusion and further reflections Appendices Bibliography Glossary Index.

78 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the structure of Irish kinship, kinship and lordship in Ireland and Wales, and kinsman and neighbour in Ireland, are discussed, as well as the shape of Welsh kinship.
Abstract: List of maps List of genealogical tables Note on terminology Part I. Irish Kinship: The structure of Irish kinship Irish ruling kindreds Part II. Welsh Kinship: The shape of Welsh kinship The Gwely and the Gafael Part III. Claims to Land by Virtue of Kinship: Irish Tellach Welsh Dadannudd Part IV. Kin and Lord The half-free in Ireland Irish clientship Kinship and lordship in Wales Part V. Kinsman and Neighbour: Kinship and neighbourhood in Ireland Kinship and neighbourhood in Wales Conclusion and further reflections Appendices Bibliography Glossary Index.

73 citations

Book
07 Feb 2013
TL;DR: The history of the Britons can be traced back to 400-664 B.C. as mentioned in this paper, when the Britons and the Irish were at war with Rome and the Britons, and the rise of Mercia, 550-685.
Abstract: Introduction: The Lands of the Britons A. AFTER ROME 1. Britain, 350-550 2. The Britons and their Languages 3. Inscriptions 4. The Britons and the Irish, 350-800 5. From Pelagius to Gildas 6. Rome and the Britons, 400-664 B. EARLY WELSH SOCIETY 7. Charters and Laws 8. Lords, Food-Renders, and Peasants 9. Kinship and Status 10. Kingship C. THE BRITONS AND THE ENGLISH, 550-1064 11. The Britons and the Northumbrians, 547-685: The Evidence 12. The Britons, Northumbria, and the rise of Mercia, 550-685 13. The Britons and their neighbours under the Mercian hegemony 14. Two Ninth-Century Writers 15. The Transformation of the Ninth Century 16. The Britons and the Empire of Britain 17. Wales, 950-1064 D. THE WELSH CHURCH AND CULTURE 18. The organization of the Welsh Church, 768-106 19. Learning 20. Poets and Story-Tellers Bibliography Index

57 citations


Cited by
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BookDOI
30 Jan 2009

287 citations

01 Sep 1982
TL;DR: A revised and updated edition of the classic in its field is an essential reference tool for all students of Christianity as discussed by the authors, listing archaeological sites vital to an accurate understanding of the origins and developments of the great western religions.
Abstract: This revised and updated edition of the classic in its field is an essential reference tool for all students of Christianity. Listing archaeological sites vital to an accurate understanding of the origins and developments of the great western religions, it also contains app. 100 pages on ancient Churches and Monasteries. Organised alphabetically and in four volumes this comprehensive work contains over 400 articles prepared by more than 150 scholars around the world. Lavishly illustrated with more than 2000 maps, plans, charts and drawings.

252 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
08 Nov 2019-Science
TL;DR: It is proposed that the Western Church transformed European kinship structures during the Middle Ages and that this transformation was a key factor behind a shift towards a WEIRDer psychology.
Abstract: Recent research not only confirms the existence of substantial psychological variation around the globe but also highlights the peculiarity of many Western populations. We propose that part of this variation can be traced back to the action and diffusion of the Western Church, the branch of Christianity that evolved into the Roman Catholic Church. Specifically, we propose that the Western Church's transformation of European kinship, by promoting small, nuclear households, weak family ties, and residential mobility, fostered greater individualism, less conformity, and more impersonal prosociality. By combining data on 24 psychological outcomes with historical measures of both Church exposure and kinship, we find support for these ideas in a comprehensive array of analyses across countries, among European regions, and among individuals from different cultural backgrounds.

189 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the government and the people in Byzantine Ephesus were discussed, from Diocletian to Heraclius, public works and public services, Pagans, Christians and Jews.
Abstract: Preface Part I. Late Antique Ephesus: 1. From Diocletian to Heraclius 2. The government and the people 3. Public works and public services 4. Pagans, Christians and Jews 5. The material remains 6. Ephesus in Late Antiquity Part II. Byzantine Ephesus: 7. The Dark Ages 8. Medieval recovery c. 850-1304 Part III. Turkish Ephesus: 9. The emirate of Aydin: 1304-1425 10. The Ottoman period: 1425-1863 Appendices Short titles and abbreviations Bibliography Index.

153 citations

Book ChapterDOI
01 Dec 2005
TL;DR: The importance of the Bishop Gregory's extensive writings in the discussions of the formation of Frankish kingdoms, the working of kingship, the roles of aristocrats and bishops, and the limits of Merovingian rule is discussed in this article.
Abstract: From the later third century, Germans whom the literary sources called Franks had joined with other barbarians to challenge Roman rule in Gaul. This chapter acknowledges the importance of the Bishop Gregory's extensive writings in the discussions of the formation of Frankish kingdoms, the working of kingship, the roles of aristocrats and bishops, and the limits of Merovingian rule. The kingdom in north-eastern Gaul was sometimes known simply as 'Francia'. It also came to be known as Austria or Austrasia. Although by the fifth century Orthodox Christianity provided a dominant world-view among the Roman population in Gaul, as the Franks expanded into Gaul they nevertheless retained their pagan cults, and even into the sixth century they continued to worship at pagan shrines, especially in northern Gaul. In the kingdom of Austrasia various combinations of Frankish aristocrats, Roman aristocrats and bishops competed for influence at the royal court.

96 citations