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T. Parthasarathi

Bio: T. Parthasarathi is an academic researcher from VIT University. The author has contributed to research in topics: Drip irrigation & Irrigation. The author has an hindex of 5, co-authored 21 publications receiving 111 citations. Previous affiliations of T. Parthasarathi include Ben-Gurion University of the Negev & Tamil Nadu Agricultural University.

Papers
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DOI
14 Mar 2013
TL;DR: In this paper, growing degree days is used to assess the suitability of a region for production of a particular crop, determine the growth stages of crops, assess the best timing of fertilizer, herbicide and plant growth regulators application, estimate heat stress accumulation on crops, predict physiological maturity and harvest dates and ideal weather unit in constructing crop weather models.
Abstract: Plant development depends on temperature and requires a specific amount of heat to develop from one point in their lifecycle to another, such as from seeding to the harvest stage. Temperature is a key factor for the timing of biological processes, and hence the growth and development of plants. Crop heat unit (CHU) or thermal time or growing degree days is a temperature response of development that differs between day and night. Growing degree days is a way of assigning a heat value to each day. Heat units are involved in several physiological processes like specific amount of heat units required for the plant at each stage from its germination to harvest of the crop would vary and the important processes are growth and development, growth parameters, metabolism, biomass, physiological maturity and yield. Growing degree days are used to assess the suitability of a region for production of a particular crop, determine the growth stages of crops, assess the best timing of fertilizer, herbicide and plant growth regulators application, estimate heat stress accumulation on crops, predict physiological maturity and harvest dates and ideal weather unit in constructing crop weather models. Keywords: heat unit, degree days, nitrification, photoperiod, phyllochron, thermal time

21 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The review mainly focuses on the advantage of crops supplemented with silicon, how Si alleviate abiotic stress as well as regulate the genes and proteins involved in metabolic and biological functions in plants.

10 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the lateral spacing of 0.8m with 1.0 LPH drippers with the plants spaced at 20 × 10 cm is suggested as the best treatment for rice cultivation in enhancing the grain yield and water productivity in the areas of limited water availability.
Abstract: Drip irrigation studies were conducted in aerobic rice during the dry season (July–October) of 2011 in Coimbatore, Tamil Nadu, India with three levels of lateral distances (0.6, 0.8 or 1.0 m) and two discharge rates, viz., 0.6 and 1.0 litre per hour (LPH) emitters. Among the lateral distances, 0.8 m lateral distance adjudged as optimum spacing for better performance in terms of physiological responses as well as yield. Between two-discharge rates, 1.0 LPH drippers out performed 0.6 LPH drippers. Interactively, laterals spaced at 0.8 m with 1.0 LPH drippers exhibited best performance by way of physiological attributes [such as relative water content, chlorophyll stability index, soluble protein, photosynthesis (PN), stomatal resistance (gs), internal CO2 concentration (Ci), nitrate reductase activity and proline content], yield and its components along with water productivity. Therefore, it is suggested that the lateral spacing of 0.8 m with 1.0 LPH drippers with the plants spaced at 20 × 10 cm is the best treatment for aerobic rice cultivation in enhancing the grain yield and water productivity in the areas of limited water availability.

10 citations


Cited by
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25 May 2016
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors collected data from peer-reviewed publications between 1980 and 2015 which examined maize and wheat yield responses to drought using field experiments and performed unweighted analysis using the log response ratio to calculate the bootstrapped confidence limits of yield responses and calculated drought sensitivities with regards to those covarying factors.
Abstract: Drought has been a major cause of agricultural disaster, yet how it affects the vulnerability of maize and wheat production in combination with several co-varying factors (i.e., phenological phases, agro-climatic regions, soil texture) remains unclear. Using a data synthesis approach, this study aims to better characterize the effects of those co-varying factors with drought and to provide critical information on minimizing yield loss. We collected data from peer-reviewed publications between 1980 and 2015 which examined maize and wheat yield responses to drought using field experiments. We performed unweighted analysis using the log response ratio to calculate the bootstrapped confidence limits of yield responses and calculated drought sensitivities with regards to those co-varying factors. Our results showed that yield reduction varied with species, with wheat having lower yield reduction (20.6%) compared to maize (39.3%) at approximately 40% water reduction. Maize was also more sensitive to drought than wheat, particularly during reproductive phase and equally sensitive in the dryland and non-dryland regions. While no yield difference was observed among regions or different soil texture, wheat cultivation in the dryland was more prone to yield loss than in the non-dryland region. Informed by these results, we discuss potential causes and possible approaches that may minimize drought impacts.

288 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This article reviewed the information collected through the literature regarding the issue of climate change, its possible causes, its projection in the near future, its impact on the agriculture sector as an influence on physiological and metabolic activities of plants, and its potential and reported implications for growth and plant productivity, pest infestation, and mitigation strategies and their economic impact.
Abstract: Climate change is a global threat to the food and nutritional security of the world. As greenhouse-gas emissions in the atmosphere are increasing, the temperature is also rising due to the greenhouse effect. The average global temperature is increasing continuously and is predicted to rise by 2 °C until 2100, which would cause substantial economic losses at the global level. The concentration of CO2, which accounts for a major proportion of greenhouse gases, is increasing at an alarming rate, and has led to higher growth and plant productivity due to increased photosynthesis, but increased temperature offsets this effect as it leads to increased crop respiration rate and evapotranspiration, higher pest infestation, a shift in weed flora, and reduced crop duration. Climate change also affects the microbial population and their enzymatic activities in soil. This paper reviews the information collected through the literature regarding the issue of climate change, its possible causes, its projection in the near future, its impact on the agriculture sector as an influence on physiological and metabolic activities of plants, and its potential and reported implications for growth and plant productivity, pest infestation, and mitigation strategies and their economic impact.

253 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Results indicate that nano-TiO2 plays a positive role in promoting photosynthetic rate, conductance to H2O, and transpiration rate of tomato leaves under mild heat stress.
Abstract: Nano-TiO2 has been reported to promote photosynthesis in some crops; however, the mechanism behind this action remains unknown. In this research, the effects of nano-TiO2 on leaf photosynthesis under mild heat stress were investigated. Results showed that the net photosynthetic rate, conductance to H2O, and transpiration rate of tomato leaves increased after application of an appropriate concentration of nano-TiO2. Nano-TiO2 also significantly decreased the minimum chlorophyll fluorescence and relative electron transport in leaves. Under mild heat stress, Nano-TiO2 increased regulated photosystem II (PS II) energy dissipation and decreased non-regulated PS II energy dissipation. These results indicate that nano-TiO2 plays a positive role in promoting photosynthesis in tomato leaves under mild heat stress.

218 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The potential of chitosan-based agronanochemicals as a sustainable alternative in crop protection against pests, diseases as well as plant growth promoters is reviewed.
Abstract: The rise in the World's food demand in line with the increase of the global population has resulted in calls for more research on the production of sustainable food and sustainable agriculture. A natural biopolymer, chitosan, coupled with nanotechnology could offer a sustainable alternative to the use of conventional agrochemicals towards a safer agriculture industry. Here, we review the potential of chitosan-based agronanochemicals as a sustainable alternative in crop protection against pests, diseases as well as plant growth promoters. Such effort offers better alternatives: (1) the existing agricultural active ingredients can be encapsulated into chitosan nanocarriers for the formation of potent biocides against plant pathogens and pests; (2) the controlled release properties and high bioavailability of the nanoformulations help in minimizing the wastage and leaching of the agrochemicals' active ingredients; (3) the small size, in the nanometer regime, enhances the penetration on the plant cell wall and cuticle, which in turn increases the argochemical uptake; (4) the encapsulation of agrochemicals in chitosan nanocarriers shields the toxic effect of the free agrochemicals on the plant, cells and DNA, thus, minimizing the negative impacts of agrochemical active ingredients on human health and environmental wellness. In addition, this article also briefly reviews the mechanism of action of chitosan against pathogens and the elicitations of plant immunity and defense response activities of chitosan-treated plants.

96 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The results show that the GDUs value to reach the physiological maturity for barley, common bean, Indian mustard, and ricinus was significantly positively correlated with Cu concentration in soil in contrast with observed in sorghum, spinach, and tomato.

67 citations