scispace - formally typeset
Search or ask a question
Author

Taira Kajisa

Other affiliations: University of Tokushima, Mitsubishi
Bio: Taira Kajisa is an academic researcher from University of Tokyo. The author has contributed to research in topics: Biosensor & Field-effect transistor. The author has an hindex of 11, co-authored 40 publications receiving 331 citations. Previous affiliations of Taira Kajisa include University of Tokushima & Mitsubishi.


Papers
More filters
Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The hydrogel FET can serve as a highly sensitive and biocompatible glucose sensor in in vivo or ex vivo applications such as eye contact lenses and sheets adhering to the skin.

46 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, a light weight multicrystalline silicon photovoltaic (PV) module was investigated by substitution of acrylic thin film for standard glass as a cover sheet, and the results revealed that the acrylic-film-cover-sheet PV module satisfied the qualifying standards of all the reliability tests in both the module appearance after tests and the electrical properties.
Abstract: Lighter weight multicrystalline silicon photovoltaic (PV) modules were investigated by substitution of acrylic thin film for standard glass as a cover sheet. Acrylic-film PV mini modules were fabricated with the composition determined from stress simulation results and tested for long-term reliability against thermal changes and humidity. The results revealed that the acrylic-film-cover-sheet PV module satisfied the qualifying standards of all the reliability tests in both the module appearance after tests and the electrical properties. Moreover, the PV module proved to be durable in the impact resistance test, even though the cover sheet was thinner. In addition, the electrical properties of the PV module were unaffected in the potential-induced degradation (PID) test, whereas those of the standard glass module were significantly deteriorated. These results indicated that it is possible for the lighter weight acrylic-film PV module to be used in the immediate future.

40 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: By measuring the kinetic parameters and electrochemical properties of well-designed devices with various added catecholamines, it is confirmed that the DA-MIP-coated FET biosensor selectively and quantitatively detects DA.

38 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper , the authors used surface plasmon resonance (SPR) techniques to detect SARS-CoV-2 nucleocapsid protein (N protein) using nanoparticle-enhanced surface resonance.
Abstract: The COVID-19 pandemic has created urgent demand for rapid detection of the SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus. Herein, we report highly sensitive detection of SARS-CoV-2 nucleocapsid protein (N protein) using nanoparticle-enhanced surface plasmon resonance (SPR) techniques. A crucial plasmonic role in significantly enhancing the limit of detection (LOD) is revealed for exceptionally large gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) with diameters of hundreds of nm. SPR enhanced by these large nanoparticles lowered the LOD of SARS-CoV-2 N protein to 85 fM, resulting in the highest SPR detection sensitivity ever obtained for SARS-CoV-2 N protein.

37 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper , the authors used surface plasmon resonance (SPR) techniques to detect SARS-CoV-2 nucleocapsid protein (N protein) using nanoparticle-enhanced surface resonance.
Abstract: The COVID-19 pandemic has created urgent demand for rapid detection of the SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus. Herein, we report highly sensitive detection of SARS-CoV-2 nucleocapsid protein (N protein) using nanoparticle-enhanced surface plasmon resonance (SPR) techniques. A crucial plasmonic role in significantly enhancing the limit of detection (LOD) is revealed for exceptionally large gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) with diameters of hundreds of nm. SPR enhanced by these large nanoparticles lowered the LOD of SARS-CoV-2 N protein to 85 fM, resulting in the highest SPR detection sensitivity ever obtained for SARS-CoV-2 N protein.

33 citations


Cited by
More filters
Journal ArticleDOI
29 Jun 2012-Science
TL;DR: Comparative analyses of 31 fungal genomes suggest that lignin-degrading peroxidases expanded in the lineage leading to the ancestor of the Agaricomycetes, which is reconstructed as a white rot species, and then contracted in parallel lineages leading to brown rot and mycorrhizal species.
Abstract: Wood is a major pool of organic carbon that is highly resistant to decay, owing largely to the presence of lignin. The only organisms capable of substantial lignin decay are white rot fungi in the Agaricomycetes, which also contains non-lignin-degrading brown rot and ectomycorrhizal species. Comparative analyses of 31 fungal genomes (12 generated for this study) suggest that lignin-degrading peroxidases expanded in the lineage leading to the ancestor of the Agaricomycetes, which is reconstructed as a white rot species, and then contracted in parallel lineages leading to brown rot and mycorrhizal species. Molecular clock analyses suggest that the origin of lignin degradation might have coincided with the sharp decrease in the rate of organic carbon burial around the end of the Carboniferous period.

1,396 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The efficiency and regulation of cellulose degradation differs among wood-rotting, litter-decomposing, mycorrhizal or plant pathogenic fungi and yeasts due to the different roles of cellulOSE degradation in the physiology and ecology of the individual groups.
Abstract: Cellulose is the main polymeric component of the plant cell wall, the most abundant polysaccharide on Earth, and an important renewable resource. Basidiomycetous fungi belong to its most potent degraders because many species grow on dead wood or litter, in environment rich in cellulose. Fungal cellulolytic systems differ from the complex cellulolytic systems of bacteria. For the degradation of cellulose, basidiomycetes utilize a set of hydrolytic enzymes typically composed of endoglucanase, cellobiohydrolase and β-glucosidase. In some species, the absence of cellobiohydrolase is substituted by the production of processive endoglucanases combining the properties of both of these enzymes. In addition, systems producing hydroxyl radicals based on cellobiose dehydrogenase, quinone redox cycling or glycopeptide-based Fenton reaction are involved in the degradation of several plant cell wall components, including cellulose. The complete cellulolytic complex used by a single fungal species is typically composed of more than one of the above mechanisms that contribute to the utilization of cellulose as a source of carbon or energy or degrade it to ensure fast substrate colonization. The efficiency and regulation of cellulose degradation differs among wood-rotting, litter-decomposing, mycorrhizal or plant pathogenic fungi and yeasts due to the different roles of cellulose degradation in the physiology and ecology of the individual groups.

724 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A detailed description of low molecular weight compounds is presented, which gives these organisms not only an advantage in wood degradation processes, but seems rather to be a new evolutionatory alternative to enzymatic combustion.
Abstract: Extensive research efforts have been dedicated to describing degradation of wood, which is a complex process; hence, microorganisms have evolved different enzymatic and non-enzymatic strategies to utilize this plentiful plant material. This review describes a number of fungal and bacterial organisms which have developed both competitive and mutualistic strategies for the decomposition of wood and to thrive in different ecological niches. Through the analysis of the enzymatic machinery engaged in wood degradation, it was possible to elucidate different strategies of wood decomposition which often depend on ecological niches inhabited by given organism. Moreover, a detailed description of low molecular weight compounds is presented, which gives these organisms not only an advantage in wood degradation processes, but seems rather to be a new evolutionatory alternative to enzymatic combustion. Through analysis of genomics and secretomic data, it was possible to underline the probable importance of certain wood-degrading enzymes produced by different fungal organisms, potentially giving them advantage in their ecological niches. The paper highlights different fungal strategies of wood degradation, which possibly correlates to the number of genes coding for secretory enzymes. Furthermore, investigation of the evolution of wood-degrading organisms has been described.

540 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
05 Aug 2011-Science
TL;DR: Fungal nutritional mode diversification suggests that the boreal forest biome originated via genetic coevolution of above- and below-ground biota through convergent evolution and divergence among fungal decomposers.
Abstract: Brown rot decay removes cellulose and hemicellulose from wood--residual lignin contributing up to 30% of forest soil carbon--and is derived from an ancestral white rot saprotrophy in which both lignin and cellulose are decomposed. Comparative and functional genomics of the "dry rot" fungus Serpula lacrymans, derived from forest ancestors, demonstrated that the evolution of both ectomycorrhizal biotrophy and brown rot saprotrophy were accompanied by reductions and losses in specific protein families, suggesting adaptation to an intercellular interaction with plant tissue. Transcriptome and proteome analysis also identified differences in wood decomposition in S. lacrymans relative to the brown rot Postia placenta. Furthermore, fungal nutritional mode diversification suggests that the boreal forest biome originated via genetic coevolution of above- and below-ground biota.

522 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This review summarizes the current knowledge on plant polysaccharide depolymerization by basidiomycete species from diverse habitats and compares these data to those for the most broadly studied ascomycete genus, Aspergillus, to provide insight into specific features of basidiaomycetes with respect to plant poly Saccharide degradation.
Abstract: SUMMARY Basidiomycete fungi subsist on various types of plant material in diverse environments, from living and dead trees and forest litter to crops and grasses and to decaying plant matter in soils. Due to the variation in their natural carbon sources, basidiomycetes have highly varied plant-polysaccharide-degrading capabilities. This topic is not as well studied for basidiomycetes as for ascomycete fungi, which are the main sources of knowledge on fungal plant polysaccharide degradation. Research on plant-biomass-decaying fungi has focused on isolating enzymes for current and future applications, such as for the production of fuels, the food industry, and waste treatment. More recently, genomic studies of basidiomycete fungi have provided a profound view of the plant-biomass-degrading potential of wood-rotting, litter-decomposing, plant-pathogenic, and ectomycorrhizal (ECM) basidiomycetes. This review summarizes the current knowledge on plant polysaccharide depolymerization by basidiomycete species from diverse habitats. In addition, these data are compared to those for the most broadly studied ascomycete genus, Aspergillus, to provide insight into specific features of basidiomycetes with respect to plant polysaccharide degradation.

313 citations