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Tanya Thrasher

Bio: Tanya Thrasher is an academic researcher. The author has contributed to research in topics: Traditional knowledge & Indigenous. The author has an hindex of 1, co-authored 2 publications receiving 19 citations.

Papers
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BookDOI
01 Feb 2009
TL;DR: The Land Has Memory exhibit at the Smithsonian's National Museum of the American Indian (NMAI) as discussed by the authors is a living exhibit, carefully created to reflect indigenous ways of thinking about land and its uses.
Abstract: This work features the stories and meanings behind the museum's landscape. In the heart of Washington, D.C., a centuries-old landscape has come alive in the twenty-first century through a re-creation of the natural environment as the region's original peoples might have known it. Unlike most landscapes that surround other museums on the National Mall, the natural environment around the Smithsonian's National Museum of the American Indian (NMAI) is itself a living exhibit, carefully created to reflect indigenous ways of thinking about the land and its uses.Abundantly illustrated, "The Land Has Memory" offers beautiful images of the museum's natural environment in every season as well as the uniquely designed building itself. Essays by Smithsonian staff and others involved in the museum's creation provide an examination of indigenous peoples' long and varied relationship to the land in the Americas, an account of the museum designers' efforts to reflect traditional knowledge in the creation of individual landscape elements, detailed descriptions of the 150 native plant species used, and an exploration of how the landscape changes seasonally. "The Land Has Memory" serves not only as an attractive and informative keepsake for museum visitors, but also as a thoughtful representation of how traditional indigenous ways of knowing can be put into practice.

18 citations

01 Jan 2009

1 citations


Cited by
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Book Chapter
01 Jan 2014
TL;DR: The Thistimely book as mentioned in this paper examines the ways in which contemporary indigenous peoples in different parts of the Americas have harnessed performance practices to resist imposed stereotypes and shape their own complex identities.
Abstract: Indigenous artists frequently voice concerns over the commodification of their cultures, a process acutely felt by those living with the consequences of colonialism. Thistimely book, which features color illustrations throughout, examines the ways in which contemporary indigenous peoples in different parts of the Americas have harnessedperformance practices to resist imposed stereotypes and shape their own complex identities. Essays by leading academics and practitioners show the vibrancy of a wide array of indigenous arts and cultural events in the United States, Mexico, Peru, Bolivia, Canada, Nicaragua, Ecuador, and Belize. As well as analyzing performance idioms, the authors trace the circulation of creative products and practices as commodities, as cultural capital, and/or as heritage. Making reference to aesthetic forms, intellectual property, and political empowerment, these essays weigh the impact of music, festivities, film, photography, theater, and museum installations among diverse audiences and discuss ways in which spectacles of cultural difference are remodeled in the hands of indigenous practitioners.

42 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the role of human values in social innovations (SIs) in four forest-dependent communities (FDCs) in Europe was studied, and the material collected was analyzed with mixed methods with respect to relational values as catalysts and consequences of SI.

30 citations

Book ChapterDOI
14 Aug 2015
TL;DR: The aim of giving heritage a valued role in the life of the community, which applies at global, national, and local levels, represents the greatest challenge for educators, trainers, and capacity-builders in the contemporary world.
Abstract: Over the last three decades, community and professional views of what constitutes significant cultural heritage have broadened in many countries around the world. Heritage practice has moved from a narrowly technical or fabric focus to a values-based approach engaging all stakeholders, including indigenous communities. While much Western heritage knowledge and practice remains indispensable, gaps can be filled in by drawing on other knowledge areas and ethical considerations, including links between heritage practice and human rights. These new directions require new approaches in the preparation of practitioners as well as others engaged in heritage processes. In addition to education and training, a third concept – capacity-building – is overarching and potentially powerful in reaching new heritage actors. The aim of giving heritage a valued role in the life of the community, which applies at global, national, and local levels, represents the greatest challenge for educators, trainers, and capacity-builders in the contemporary world.

28 citations

19 Mar 2013
TL;DR: Blakley as discussed by the authors examines the explorations and writings of John and William Bartram; it seeks to reinterpret of their careers to recover the latent political motivations and consequences of their explorations into the territories of a number of indigenous American polities from the 1740s to the 1770s.
Abstract: BLAKLEY, CHRISTOPHER M. Visions of Terrestrial Happiness: Natural History, Empire, and the Environment of Colonial North America, 1751-1791. (Under the direction of Dr. Judy Kertész). Knowledge of nature, both scientific and literary, became a political discourse in colonial America and the early republic. Eighteenth century representations of nature functioned in the imaginary of the colonial Anglo-American republic of letters as an emblem of order, harmony, and economic and political potential. Circulation of plants, rocks, animals, technology, and ideas across the Atlantic World enabled a discourse of natural history that sought to describe, and thus imagine, what exactly was natural in North America. Natural history enveloped Native American polities into the discourse of nature by representing them as objects within a landscape. This thesis examines the explorations and writings of John and William Bartram; it seeks to reinterpret of their careers to recover the latent political motivations and consequences of their explorations into the territories of a number of indigenous American polities from the 1740s to the 1770s. Writing about the environment of the western and southeastern frontiers, the Bartrams constructed representations of colonial America as a garden. This image of the continent functioned first as an extension of the natural development of the British Empire and second as a natural site of the republican empire of the American nation. Ideas originating from taxonomy, economics, the sublime, and theology informed how the Bartrams read and described Nature and the indigenous polities of North America. © Copyright 2012 by Christopher Blakley All Rights Reserved Visions of Terrestrial Happiness: Natural History, Empire, and the Environment of Colonial North America, 1751 1791 by Christopher Blakley A thesis submitted to the Graduate Faculty of North Carolina State University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Arts

27 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, a literature review shows the realm of Indigenous cultural heritage preservation within libraries is an area still ripe for meaningful exploration and achievement, yet this field is also still sensitive and potentially harmful for the cultural communities who have entrusted these institutions with their living treasures.
Abstract: This literature review shows the realm of Indigenous cultural heritage preservation within libraries is an area still ripe for meaningful exploration and achievement. Yet this field is also still sensitive and potentially harmful for the cultural communities who have entrusted these institutions with their living treasures. Opportunities abound to make a difference, but they may need to evolve from changes in generational attitudes and approaches.

23 citations