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Tao Wei

Bio: Tao Wei is a academic researcher who has co-authored 1 publication(s) receiving 3104 citation(s). The author has an hindex of 1. The author has done significant research in the topic(s): Asymptomatic carrier.

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Open accessJournal ArticleDOI: 10.1001/JAMA.2020.2565
Yan Bai, Lingsheng Yao, Tao Wei, Fei Tian1  +3 moreInstitutions (2)
14 Apr 2020-JAMA
Abstract: This study describes possible transmission of novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) from an asymptomatic Wuhan resident to 5 family members in Anyang, a Chinese city in the neighboring province of Hubei.

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Topics: Asymptomatic carrier (57%)

3,104 Citations

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Open accessJournal ArticleDOI: 10.1056/NEJMC2004973
Abstract: Aerosol and Surface Stability of SARS-CoV-2 In this research letter, investigators report on the stability of SARS-CoV-2 and SARS-CoV-1 under experimental conditions. The viability of the two virus...

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5,763 Citations


Open accessJournal ArticleDOI: 10.1038/S41591-020-0869-5
Xi He1, Eric H. Y. Lau2, Peng Wu2, Xilong Deng1  +19 moreInstitutions (2)
15 Apr 2020-Nature Medicine
Abstract: We report temporal patterns of viral shedding in 94 patients with laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 and modeled COVID-19 infectiousness profiles from a separate sample of 77 infector–infectee transmission pairs. We observed the highest viral load in throat swabs at the time of symptom onset, and inferred that infectiousness peaked on or before symptom onset. We estimated that 44% (95% confidence interval, 30–57%) of secondary cases were infected during the index cases’ presymptomatic stage, in settings with substantial household clustering, active case finding and quarantine outside the home. Disease control measures should be adjusted to account for probable substantial presymptomatic transmission. Presymptomatic transmission of SARS-CoV-2 is estimated to account for a substantial proportion of COVID-19 cases.

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Topics: Viral load (51%)

2,928 Citations


Open accessJournal ArticleDOI: 10.1038/S41591-020-0965-6
Quanxin Long1, Xiaojun Tang2, Qiu Lin Shi2, Qin Li3  +15 moreInstitutions (3)
18 Jun 2020-Nature Medicine
Abstract: The clinical features and immune responses of asymptomatic individuals infected with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) have not been well described We studied 37 asymptomatic individuals in the Wanzhou District who were diagnosed with RT-PCR-confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infections but without any relevant clinical symptoms in the preceding 14 d and during hospitalization Asymptomatic individuals were admitted to the government-designated Wanzhou People's Hospital for centralized isolation in accordance with policy1 The median duration of viral shedding in the asymptomatic group was 19 d (interquartile range (IQR), 15-26 d) The asymptomatic group had a significantly longer duration of viral shedding than the symptomatic group (log-rank P = 0028) The virus-specific IgG levels in the asymptomatic group (median S/CO, 34; IQR, 16-107) were significantly lower (P = 0005) relative to the symptomatic group (median S/CO, 205; IQR, 58-382) in the acute phase Of asymptomatic individuals, 933% (28/30) and 811% (30/37) had reduction in IgG and neutralizing antibody levels, respectively, during the early convalescent phase, as compared to 968% (30/31) and 622% (23/37) of symptomatic patients Forty percent of asymptomatic individuals became seronegative and 129% of the symptomatic group became negative for IgG in the early convalescent phase In addition, asymptomatic individuals exhibited lower levels of 18 pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines These data suggest that asymptomatic individuals had a weaker immune response to SARS-CoV-2 infection The reduction in IgG and neutralizing antibody levels in the early convalescent phase might have implications for immunity strategy and serological surveys

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Topics: Asymptomatic (64%), Interquartile range (51%)

1,854 Citations


Open accessJournal ArticleDOI: 10.1126/SCIENCE.ABB6936
Luca Ferretti1, Chris Wymant1, Michelle Kendall1, Lele Zhao1  +5 moreInstitutions (1)
31 Mar 2020-Science
Abstract: The newly emergent human virus SARS-CoV-2 (severe acute respiratory syndrome-coronavirus 2) is resulting in high fatality rates and incapacitated health systems. Preventing further transmission is a priority. We analyzed key parameters of epidemic spread to estimate the contribution of different transmission routes and determine requirements for case isolation and contact tracing needed to stop the epidemic. Although SARS-CoV-2 is spreading too fast to be contained by manual contact tracing, it could be controlled if this process were faster, more efficient, and happened at scale. A contact-tracing app that builds a memory of proximity contacts and immediately notifies contacts of positive cases can achieve epidemic control if used by enough people. By targeting recommendations to only those at risk, epidemics could be contained without resorting to mass quarantines ("lockdowns") that are harmful to society. We discuss the ethical requirements for an intervention of this kind.

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Topics: Contact tracing (51%)

1,692 Citations


Open accessJournal ArticleDOI: 10.1001/JAMA.2020.12839
25 Aug 2020-JAMA
Abstract: Importance The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, due to the novel severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), has caused a worldwide sudden and substantial increase in hospitalizations for pneumonia with multiorgan disease. This review discusses current evidence regarding the pathophysiology, transmission, diagnosis, and management of COVID-19. Observations SARS-CoV-2 is spread primarily via respiratory droplets during close face-to-face contact. Infection can be spread by asymptomatic, presymptomatic, and symptomatic carriers. The average time from exposure to symptom onset is 5 days, and 97.5% of people who develop symptoms do so within 11.5 days. The most common symptoms are fever, dry cough, and shortness of breath. Radiographic and laboratory abnormalities, such as lymphopenia and elevated lactate dehydrogenase, are common, but nonspecific. Diagnosis is made by detection of SARS-CoV-2 via reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction testing, although false-negative test results may occur in up to 20% to 67% of patients; however, this is dependent on the quality and timing of testing. Manifestations of COVID-19 include asymptomatic carriers and fulminant disease characterized by sepsis and acute respiratory failure. Approximately 5% of patients with COVID-19, and 20% of those hospitalized, experience severe symptoms necessitating intensive care. More than 75% of patients hospitalized with COVID-19 require supplemental oxygen. Treatment for individuals with COVID-19 includes best practices for supportive management of acute hypoxic respiratory failure. Emerging data indicate that dexamethasone therapy reduces 28-day mortality in patients requiring supplemental oxygen compared with usual care (21.6% vs 24.6%; age-adjusted rate ratio, 0.83 [95% CI, 0.74-0.92]) and that remdesivir improves time to recovery (hospital discharge or no supplemental oxygen requirement) from 15 to 11 days. In a randomized trial of 103 patients with COVID-19, convalescent plasma did not shorten time to recovery. Ongoing trials are testing antiviral therapies, immune modulators, and anticoagulants. The case-fatality rate for COVID-19 varies markedly by age, ranging from 0.3 deaths per 1000 cases among patients aged 5 to 17 years to 304.9 deaths per 1000 cases among patients aged 85 years or older in the US. Among patients hospitalized in the intensive care unit, the case fatality is up to 40%. At least 120 SARS-CoV-2 vaccines are under development. Until an effective vaccine is available, the primary methods to reduce spread are face masks, social distancing, and contact tracing. Monoclonal antibodies and hyperimmune globulin may provide additional preventive strategies. Conclusions and Relevance As of July 1, 2020, more than 10 million people worldwide had been infected with SARS-CoV-2. Many aspects of transmission, infection, and treatment remain unclear. Advances in prevention and effective management of COVID-19 will require basic and clinical investigation and public health and clinical interventions.

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Topics: Intensive care (57%), Respiratory failure (54%), Case fatality rate (53%) ...read more

1,665 Citations


Performance
Metrics

Author's H-index: 1

No. of papers from the Author in previous years
YearPapers
20201

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Author's top 1 most impactful journals

JAMA

1 papers, 3.1K citations