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Teresa Dobson

Bio: Teresa Dobson is an academic researcher from University of British Columbia. The author has contributed to research in topics: Reading (process) & Literacy. The author has an hindex of 11, co-authored 42 publications receiving 547 citations.

Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This paper examined the intersection of age and ICT (information and communication technology) competency and found that there was not a statistically significant difference with respect to ICT competence among different age groups for either pre-program or post-program surveys, suggesting that the digital divide thought to exist between "native" and "immigrants" may be misleading, distracting education researchers from more careful consideration of the diversity of ICT users and the nuances of their ICT competencies.
Abstract: This article examines the intersection of age and ICT (information and communication technology) competency and critiques the “digital natives versus digital immigrants” argument proposed by Prensky (2001a, 2001b). Quantitative analysis was applied to a statistical data set collected in the context of a study with over 2,000 pre-service teachers conducted at the University of British Columbia, Canada, between 2001 and 2004. Findings from this study show that there was not a statistically significant difference with respect to ICT competence among different age groups for either pre-program or post-program surveys. Classroom observations since 2003 in different educational settings in Canada and the United States support this finding. This study implies that the digital divide thought to exist between “native” and “immigrant” users may be misleading, distracting education researchers from more careful consideration of the diversity of ICT users and the nuances of their ICT competencies.

195 citations

Journal Article
TL;DR: In a study of readers who read either a simulated literary hypertext or the same text in linear form, a range of significant differences suggest that hypertext discourages the absorbed and reflective mode that characterizes literary reading.
Abstract: Hypertext has been promoted as a vehicle that will change literary reading, especially through its recovery of images, supposed to be suppressed by print, and through the choice offered to the reader by links. Evidence from empirical studies of reading, however, suggests that these aspects of hypertext may disrupt reading. In a study of readers who read either a simulated literary hypertext or the same text in linear form, we found a range of significant differences: these suggest that hypertext discourages the absorbed and reflective mode that characterizes literary reading.

92 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, a study with 36 pre-service teachers who used the wiki to generate a communal response to a set of standards for teachers revealed much about social negotiations in such settings, and about the affordances of such software for formal education.
Abstract: Understanding of the nature of social negotiations in social software spaces used in support of formal, face‐to‐face education remains limited. In this paper, we consider how a community of learners working collaboratively in a wiki environment established social hierarchies and negotiated power. Described is a study with 36 pre‐service teachers who used the wiki to generate a communal response to a set of standards for teachers. The students' engagement in this activity over the course of 10 months revealed much about social negotiations in such settings, and about the affordances of such software for formal education. Les negociations sociales dans un environnement Wiki: une etude de cas avec des enseignants en formation initiale La comprehension de la nature des negociations interpersonnelles dans les espaces sociaux des logiciels utilises pour soutenir l'enseignement formel presentiel, demeure limitee. Dans le present article on considere la facon dont une communaute d'apprenants travaillant de facon ...

70 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors compare the importance of physical and mental health in the development of children in the United States and in Kenya, East Africa, where children use their unstructured time, in and out of school, to explore and play in active ways.
Abstract: Background: In the industrialized world opportunities for children to explore movement in active, imaginative ways during free play periods are increasingly threatened for a range of reasons, stemming from caregiver concern for children's safety to the abundance of game technologies that capture the attention of youth. In contrast, Kenya, East Africa, provides indigenous settings wherein children use their unstructured time, in and out of school, to explore and play in active ways. In comparing the two settings, we observe that one problem in the changing childhood environments of the industrialized world is that the value of movement continues to be largely overlooked. Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to revisit discourses that promote mind–body connection, such as physical literacy, or, as we phrase it, movement literacy. We hope to engage educators in conversations respecting how we might practically and theoretically dissolve the boundaries between body and mind with a view to exploring curricula...

42 citations

Proceedings ArticleDOI
08 Feb 2011
TL;DR: It is suggested that comments posted to YouTube provide unique insights into the ways young people engage with and make meaning from user-generated video to support their learning.
Abstract: YouTube is one of the largest databases in the world, providing informative and entertaining video to millions of users around the globe. It is also becoming an important source of homework assistance to young people as they supplement their learning practices with user-generated tutorials on a range of topics. This poster presents our ongoing work in this emerging area of information literacy: how young people make meaning with information sources on YouTube to support their academic needs. We describe our system for analyzing user-generated feedback on video channels that support students academically, and report preliminary findings of our ongoing analysis. Drawing on several complementary frameworks, including information sharing, help seeking, and dialogic inquiry, we suggest that comments posted to YouTube provide unique insights into the ways young people engage with and make meaning from user-generated video to support their learning. This work has implications for educators, librarians, and the designers of interactive learning technologies.

19 citations


Cited by
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Book
01 Jan 2003
TL;DR: In this paper, Sherry Turkle uses Internet MUDs (multi-user domains, or in older gaming parlance multi-user dungeons) as a launching pad for explorations of software design, user interfaces, simulation, artificial intelligence, artificial life, agents, virtual reality, and the on-line way of life.
Abstract: From the Publisher: A Question of Identity Life on the Screen is a fascinating and wide-ranging investigation of the impact of computers and networking on society, peoples' perceptions of themselves, and the individual's relationship to machines. Sherry Turkle, a Professor of the Sociology of Science at MIT and a licensed psychologist, uses Internet MUDs (multi-user domains, or in older gaming parlance multi-user dungeons) as a launching pad for explorations of software design, user interfaces, simulation, artificial intelligence, artificial life, agents, "bots," virtual reality, and "the on-line way of life." Turkle's discussion of postmodernism is particularly enlightening. She shows how postmodern concepts in art, architecture, and ethics are related to concrete topics much closer to home, for example AI research (Minsky's "Society of Mind") and even MUDs (exemplified by students with X-window terminals who are doing homework in one window and simultaneously playing out several different roles in the same MUD in other windows). Those of you who have (like me) been turned off by the shallow, pretentious, meaningless paintings and sculptures that litter our museums of modern art may have a different perspective after hearing what Turkle has to say. This is a psychoanalytical book, not a technical one. However, software developers and engineers will find it highly accessible because of the depth of the author's technical understanding and credibility. Unlike most other authors in this genre, Turkle does not constantly jar the technically-literate reader with blatant errors or bogus assertions about how things work. Although I personally don't have time or patience for MUDs,view most of AI as snake-oil, and abhor postmodern architecture, I thought the time spent reading this book was an extremely good investment.

4,965 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
01 Jan 1986
TL;DR: The New York Review ofBooks as mentioned in this paper is now over twenty years old and it has attracted controversy since its inception, but it is the controversies that attract the interest of the reader and to which the history, especially an admittedly impressionistic survey, must give some attention.
Abstract: It comes as something ofa surprise to reflect that the New York Review ofBooks is now over twenty years old. Even people of my generation (that is, old enough to remember the revolutionary 196os but not young enough to have taken a very exciting part in them) think of the paper as eternally youthful. In fact, it has gone through years of relatively quiet life, yet, as always in a competitive journalistic market, it is the controversies that attract the interest of the reader and to which the history (especially an admittedly impressionistic survey that tries to include something of the intellectual context in which a journal has operated) must give some attention. Not all the attacks which the New York Review has attracted, both early in its career and more recently, are worth more than a brief summary. What do we now make, for example, of Richard Kostelanetz's forthright accusation that 'The New York Review was from its origins destined to publicize Random House's (and especially [Jason] Epstein's) books and writers'?1 Well, simply that, even if the statistics bear out the charge (and Kostelanetz provides some suggestive evidence to support it, at least with respect to some early issues), there is nothing surprising in a market economy about a publisher trying to push his books through the pages of a journal edited by his friends. True, the New York Review has not had room to review more than around fifteen books in each issue and there could be a bias in the selection of

2,430 citations

Journal ArticleDOI

1,256 citations