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Author

Thayaparan Gajendran

Other affiliations: Newcastle University
Bio: Thayaparan Gajendran is an academic researcher from University of Newcastle. The author has contributed to research in topics: Project team & Disaster risk reduction. The author has an hindex of 16, co-authored 118 publications receiving 881 citations. Previous affiliations of Thayaparan Gajendran include Newcastle University.


Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, a framework for the analysis of organisational culture in respect of ICT implementation across an organization in the construction industry is presented. But the authors highlight the influence of the organisation's culture, mani...
Abstract: Purpose – Although the deployment of information and communication technology (ICT) in the construction industry is widespread recent research indicates that the surrounding contextual issues hinder its successful application in many project settings. This paper aims to develop a framework for the analysis of organisational culture in respect of ICT implementation across an organisation in the construction industry.Design/methodology/approach – An re‐analysis of critical success factors (CSF) for ICT integration, identified through data from a Delphi study of industry experts and a questionnaire survey of ICT users, using Martin's three‐perspective framework applying both the functional and non‐functional approaches to cultural analysis was conducted.Findings – The research revealed the theoretical dimensions and properties of organisational culture that influence CSFs for ICT integration in construction projects teams. This paper concludes by highlighting the influence of the organisation's culture, mani...

76 citations

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TL;DR: In this paper, the authors investigate factors that influence the successful implementation of Project Alliancing by means of a case study approach focusing on the procurement of a large water treatment plant and identify critical success factors (CSFs) both from literature and the case study project Design/methodology/approach.
Abstract: Purpose – There has been a significant increase in the use of relationship contracting in the global construction industry, with strategies such as Partnering, Alliancing and Public-Private Partnerships all used These approaches were introduced to the Australian construction industry in the 1990s in an attempt to overcome the adversarial nature of traditional contracting methods The purpose of this paper is to investigate factors that influence the successful implementation of Project Alliancing by means of a case study approach focusing on the procurement of a large water treatment plant The research findings identify critical success factors (CSFs) both from literature and the case study project Design/methodology/approach – The research traces the origins of Alliancing and identifies CSFs by reviewing literature and analysing a current case study project The paper first identifies CSFs on a global scale by establishing a theoretical framework of CSFs and then compares this to the case study projec

65 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, a review of the literature aimed at understanding the different influences impacting on IBS adoption is presented, focusing on how emerging (a) contextual factors (e.g., economics conditions, technology development, etc.).
Abstract: The adoption of industrialised building systems (IBS) technology, with its focus on off-site prefabrication and modularisation, offers a significant reduction in environmental degradation, while simultaneously achieving significant productivity gains, decreasing labour requirements and improving working conditions. IBS technology is now one of the prevalent and growing building technologies in developed and developing countries. Policy approaches in some countries have thus concentrated on providing tailored support to encourage IBS technology adoption. Despite the obvious benefits of IBS technology, the adoption is very slow. This paper reviews literature aimed at understanding the different influences impacting on IBS adoption. The aim of the paper is to categorise and synthesis factors identified in the literature that explicitly or implicitly impact on IBS adoption decision-making. It specifically focuses on how emerging (a) contextual factors (e.g. economics conditions, technology development...

61 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the role of community participation in improving the effectiveness of the information deficit model towards disaster preparedness was examined based on a field study in three flood-prone informal communities of Accra, Ghana.
Abstract: The information deficit model (IDM) suggests that disseminating relevant information to the public about an issue or concern can result in people changing their perception, beliefs and attitude leading to positive actions. In the context of disaster preparedness, IDM suggests that providing information associated to disaster risk and response actions to concerned stakeholders should increase the level of disaster preparedness, leading to mitigation in the growing damages caused by disasters. Yet, in spite of notable global and local strategy of disaster education and information campaigns, there has not been a commensurate success in flood preparedness worldwide. Based on a field study in three flood-prone informal communities of Accra, Ghana, this paper examines the role of community participation in improving the effectiveness of the IDM towards disaster preparedness. By using Structural Equation Modelling (SEM), this paper develops a model to test the mediating and moderating effects of ‘community participation’ on the relationship between ‘information sufficiency’ and ‘intentions to prepare’. Results showed that disaster information that is accessible, comprehensive, and tailored to the needs of the public, strongly influences intentions to prepare for disasters. However, this effect occurs when community participation is integrated into the information dissemination process of disaster risks. Thus, if disaster preparedness is to be realised, disaster management programs/activities must ensure sufficient and participatory information dissemination as a measure to influence intentions to prepare for disaster risks among the general public.

46 citations

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TL;DR: In this paper, the authors developed a theoretical framework through literature review coupling the concepts of "disaster hazards", "vulnerability" and "informal settlements" for disaster preparedness in informal settlements.

41 citations


Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Reading a book as this basics of qualitative research grounded theory procedures and techniques and other references can enrich your life quality.

13,415 citations

01 Jan 2015
TL;DR: The work of the IPCC Working Group III 5th Assessment report as mentioned in this paper is a comprehensive, objective and policy neutral assessment of the current scientific knowledge on mitigating climate change, which has been extensively reviewed by experts and governments to ensure quality and comprehensiveness.
Abstract: The talk with present the key results of the IPCC Working Group III 5th assessment report. Concluding four years of intense scientific collaboration by hundreds of authors from around the world, the report responds to the request of the world's governments for a comprehensive, objective and policy neutral assessment of the current scientific knowledge on mitigating climate change. The report has been extensively reviewed by experts and governments to ensure quality and comprehensiveness.

3,224 citations

01 Jan 2008
TL;DR: In this article, the authors argue that rational actors make their organizations increasingly similar as they try to change them, and describe three isomorphic processes-coercive, mimetic, and normative.
Abstract: What makes organizations so similar? We contend that the engine of rationalization and bureaucratization has moved from the competitive marketplace to the state and the professions. Once a set of organizations emerges as a field, a paradox arises: rational actors make their organizations increasingly similar as they try to change them. We describe three isomorphic processes-coercive, mimetic, and normative—leading to this outcome. We then specify hypotheses about the impact of resource centralization and dependency, goal ambiguity and technical uncertainty, and professionalization and structuration on isomorphic change. Finally, we suggest implications for theories of organizations and social change.

2,134 citations

Journal Article
TL;DR: This study reviews several of the most commonly used inductive teaching methods, including inquiry learning, problem-based learning, project-basedLearning, case-based teaching, discovery learning, and just-in-time teaching, and defines each method, highlights commonalities and specific differences, and reviews research on the effectiveness.
Abstract: Traditional engineering instruction is deductive, beginning with theories and progressing to the applications of those theories Alternative teaching approaches are more inductive Topics are introduced by presenting specific observations, case studies or problems, and theories are taught or the students are helped to discover them only after the need to know them has been established This study reviews several of the most commonly used inductive teaching methods, including inquiry learning, problem-based learning, project-based learning, case-based teaching, discovery learning, and just-in-time teaching The paper defines each method, highlights commonalities and specific differences, and reviews research on the effectiveness of the methods While the strength of the evidence varies from one method to another, inductive methods are consistently found to be at least equal to, and in general more effective than, traditional deductive methods for achieving a broad range of learning outcomes

1,673 citations

Journal ArticleDOI

1,014 citations