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Theophylactus Simocatta

Bio: Theophylactus Simocatta is an academic researcher. The author has an hindex of 1, co-authored 1 publications receiving 21 citations.

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Book
13 Sep 2007
TL;DR: Rome and Iran to the beginning of the third century AD as mentioned in this paper, a chronological survey of the Sasanian Empire and its relations with the Roman Empire, is presented in this book.
Abstract: Part I. Narrative: 1. Rome and Iran to the beginning of the third century AD 2. Rome and the Sasanian Empire - a chronological survey Part II. Sources and Contexts: 3. Political goals 4. Warfare 5. Military confrontations 6. The diplomatic solutions 7. Arabia between the great powers 8. Shared interests - continuing conflicts 9. Religion - Christianity and Zoroastrianism 10. Emperor and King of Kings 11. Exchange of information between West and East Part III. Appendices.

132 citations

MonographDOI
17 Apr 2018
TL;DR: In this article, Hameen-Anttila analyzed the lost sixth-century history of the Sasanians, its lost Arabic translations, and the sources of Firdawsi's Shāhnāme.
Abstract: In Khwadāynāmag. The Middle Persian Book of Kings Jaakko Hameen-Anttila analyses the lost sixth-century historiographical work of the Sasanians, its lost Arabic translations, and the sources of Firdawsī's Shāhnāme .

33 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The famous Byzantine embassy of Zemarchus to the western ruler of the Turks is quite a well-known story as mentioned in this paper, and an attempt is made to clarify some details of the journey, with special focus on methods and manners of communication.
Abstract: The famous embassy of Zemarchus to the western ruler of the Turks is quite a well-known story. In this paper an attempt is made to clarify some details of the journey, with special focus on methods and manners of communication. Did Byzantine diplomacy make use of some of its old skills in dealing with the Altaic peoples, or, as many scholars have already supposed, was there a new process based mainly on experiences with Sasanian Iran and other Iranian peoples?

33 citations

Book ChapterDOI
01 Nov 2010
TL;DR: The Sasanians as mentioned in this paper were one of the last Achaemenid 'ancestors' to be made king by Rustam's aristocratic party, thus becoming the last ruler of the Parthian empire.
Abstract: As opposed to the Arsacids, the Sasanians, like their Achaemenid 'ancestors', tell a great deal about their notions of government, their public appearances and their political aspirations in both the domestic and foreign spheres. All lands of the former Parthian empire, except for Armenia, came under Sasanian control during the reign of the founder of the dynasty, Ardashir. Yazdgerd III was made king by Rustam's aristocratic party, thus becoming the Sasanians' last ruler. It was a decidedly Iranian attitude that characterised the Sasanian image of the ruler and his qualities. The late Sasanian period was altogether a time of literary flowering, much of it commissioned or sponsored by the royal court. The Sasanian empire was also characterised by the magnitude and diversity of its religious groups and communities. Whereas the fourth century was characterised by numerous military conflicts between the superpowers Iran and Byzantium.

32 citations

Book ChapterDOI
01 Sep 2014

17 citations