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Thi Thuy Linh Le

Bio: Thi Thuy Linh Le is an academic researcher. The author has contributed to research in topics: Digital transformation & Business. The author has an hindex of 1, co-authored 1 publications receiving 5 citations.

Papers
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Dissertation
27 Mar 2017
TL;DR: In this article, the authors address three important aspects of vulnerability and inclusive development, namely: Informality (chapter 1), education dilemma (chapter 2) and non-standard employment (chapter 3).
Abstract: This PhD dissertation is dedicated to the issue of ‘exclusivist’ growth and vulnerability characterizing Vietnam as well as developing Asia today. The chapters address three important aspects of vulnerability and inclusive development, namely: Informality (chapter 1), Education dilemma (chapter 2) and Non-standard employment (chapter 3). The contribution of this work lies in the novelty and relevance of research topics; the wide range of data used, both quantitative and qualitative, including Household Business and Informal Sector Surveys in Vietnam, and national Labor Force Surveys of various countries in Asia; as well as the originality of methodology. Chapter 1 investigates the heterogeneity of the informal sector in Vietnam, based on a unique quali-quanti approach. Chapter 2 focuses on the variation of the returns to higher education across the Vietnamese population with different estimation models. Chapter 3 is the first study that systematically examines the wage differentials induced by temporary job status in Asian developing countries. Overall, the whole thesis implies that human capital, employment, and income are interrelated facets of individual well-being, and that some development phenomena should be analyzed in their heterogeneity.

5 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article , a desk review of existing literature, policy analysis, and semi-structured interviews was conducted to investigate English language policy implementation in Vietnam's rural and remote areas from the perspective of primary English teachers from 2008 onwards.
Abstract: In the context of English as a global language, compulsory English language education at the primary level has become an inevitable trend in many non-English-speaking countries, including Vietnam. However, there have been concerns regarding how English language policy is realised across contextual settings, especially in rural and remote areas of Vietnam. Based on language-in-education goals, this article investigates English language policy implementation in Vietnam’s rural and remote areas from the perspective of primary English teachers from 2008 onwards. The present paper employs a desk review of existing literature, policy analysis, and semi-structured interviews. Data collected from multiple sources show the inequality of access to English language learning in the rural localities. The findings also indicate a significant gap between the current English language policy goals and implementation in the rural primary sector regarding slow execution, curriculum variations, limited teaching resources, inappropriate pedagogy, and assessment. These problems have been accelerated due to a shortage of teachers as well as inconsistency and limitations related to pre-service teacher training programs and recruitment. Identifying significant challenges of English language policy implementation in the Northwest of Vietnam helps shed light on primary English education in remote and marginalised regions. Therefore, the recommendations target policy makers, teacher educators, and stakeholders to assist primary English teachers in rural areas to improve and advance the success of primary English education in Vietnam’s remote areas and beyond the specific context to which it refers.

1 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper , the impact of digital transactions made by digital technology on the bank's deposit and lending revenue in developing countries has been investigated using POOL, FEM, REM, and FGLS models, which showed that digital banks' flexible products and services bring many benefits with a high level of interaction, such as supporting the relationship between customers and banks and improving operating revenue.
Abstract: Purpose: The study's objective is to test the impact of digital transactions on banking performance. Based on the previous research and the actual situations, it has been recognized that the critical role of digital banking is in developing the banking industry, especially in developing countries. Theoretical framework: In the next section, the study presents background information to promote the research. The digital transformation has changed how customers use financial services. This has pushed banks to adapt more quickly to the wave of digital transformation if they don't want to lose their valuable customer base. Design/methodology/approach: the methodology applied uses POOL, FEM, REM, and FGLS models to examine the impact of banking transactions made by digital technology on the bank's deposit and lending revenue. This article studies banking operations on digital platforms from 2012 to 2019 in developing countries. Findings: The article's findings showed that digital banks' flexible products and services bring many benefits with a high level of interaction, such as supporting the relationship between customers and banks and improving operating revenue. Research, Practical & Social implications: Practical implications enhanced the development potential of digital banking is relatively large, stemming from the market demand development orientation of the banking industry. Originality/value: The paper's originality and value help banks invest in digital technology as the way forward to better serve their customers.
Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper , a cross-sectional study was used to assess the knowledge of teaching methods of all nurse lectures from five nursing schools, and the results indicated the need of conducting the training program for nurse lecturers.
Abstract: Objectives: To assess the prior knowledge of teaching methods among nurse lecturers before participating in the train-of-trainer workshop, namely “Covid-19 and Nursing Education: Strengthening nurse lecturers’ teaching capacities and learning environments for the new nornal”. Subjects and methods: A cross - sectional study was used to assess the knowledge of teaching methods of all nurse lectures from five nursing schools. An online survey, which had 25 items related to 05 topics in the workshop, was developed. Results: 26 nurse lecturers completed this online survey. The results of the pre-test survey showed that the average score of knowledge about teaching methods was 12 (± 2.8) with the possible score ranged from 0 - 25 points. Only 02 lecturers correctly answered 19 questions out of a total of 25 questions. The most incorrect answers were given by the lecturers in the knowledge area about debriefing techniques in simulation training and peer support methods. Conclusion: The initial results of knowledge regarding teaching methods indicated the need of conducting the training program for nurse lecturers. The study outcome has potential application based on its series of training workshops, teaching demonstration and a combination of quantitative and qualitative evaluation on the effectiveness of the training program.

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Posted Content
TL;DR: In this article, the authors estimate the earnings gap between formal and informal employment in Thailand, using a sample of workers that includes both wage and self-employed workers, and apply a quantile regression method to an earnings function to understand the factors that explain differences in earnings for different quartiles.
Abstract: The paper estimates the earnings gap between formal and informal employment in Thailand, using a sample of workers that includes both wage and self- employed workers. It finds that while the major part of the earnings differential is attributed to observed characteristics, there is a significant unexplained component. The paper then applies a quantile regression method to an earnings function to understand the factors that explain differences in earnings for different quartiles. Controlling for other factors, it finds that informally employed workers systematically present lower earnings at all earnings levels, and the difference increases with level of earnings. Furthermore, the estimated marginal effect of gender on earnings is negative and remains more or less constant across the different quartiles, while returns to education are positive and increase with income quartiles. The premium of working in services or manufacturing is higher at the lower end of the income distribution and the non- farm self-employed worker is likely to earn more than others. The findings of this study have implications for policies for productive transformation in the country, along with a focus on education and gender equality.

10 citations

26 Aug 2010
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors examined the change in the structure of the Philippines labor force in terms of workers' earnings and found that the earnings and educational profiles of the self-employed are similar to those of casual wage earners, and clearly dominated by those of permanent wage earners.
Abstract: Analysis of labor force survey data from 1994 to 2007 reveals that the structure of the Philippines labor force has been changing in several important ways. One is the movement from self-employment, the most predominant form of employment, to wage employment across a wide range of production sectors. How does one evaluate this change in terms of workers’ earnings –arguably the most important element of job quality? Since labor force survey data do not provide information on earnings of the self-employed we combine information on household incomes (disaggregated by source) from the Family Income and Expenditure Survey (FIES) with information on household members’ employment related activities from the Labor Force Survey (LFS) to shed light on this question. We also examine broad trends in the structure for employment, wages, and earnings. Our findings suggest that the decline of self-employment is no bad thing. For the most part, the earnings and educational profiles of the self-employed are very similar to those of casual wage earners, and clearly dominated by those of permanent wage earners even when observable worker characteristics are controlled for. An implication is that the self-employed do not seem to be ‘capitalists in waiting’ as noted in recent literature. As self-employment gives way to wage employment, especially casual wage employment in the services sector, the key challenge for policy is tackling the slow growth of wages and earnings indicated by both LFS and FIES data.

9 citations

01 Jan 2008
TL;DR: The authors used the Household Expenditure and Income Survey from Turkey to estimate the rate of returns on various levels of education investment by gender with and without correction for the sample selection bias, and found that the estimated rates, ranging from 7% for elementary education to 11.5% for college education, are in line with the findings for similar countries.
Abstract: Past studies typically have employed Mincerian earning function and Household Income surveys to estimate rates of return to education. However, those studies have often treated sample selection bias arbitrarily. Using the Household Expenditure and Income Survey from Turkey, we estimate the rate of returns on various levels of education investment by gender with and without correction for the sample selection bias. Our results suggest first, that the estimated rates, ranging from 7% for elementary education to 11.5% for college education, are in line with the findings for similar countries and second, despite the significance level of the coefficient of the inverse Mills ratio, the size of the sample selection bias is modest, ranging between 1% and 10%. We explain some of the underlying reasons for this phenomenon.

1 citations