scispace - formally typeset
Search or ask a question
Author

Thomas A. Finholt

Other affiliations: Carnegie Mellon University
Bio: Thomas A. Finholt is an academic researcher from University of Michigan. The author has contributed to research in topics: Cyberinfrastructure & Collaboratory. The author has an hindex of 24, co-authored 50 publications receiving 3427 citations. Previous affiliations of Thomas A. Finholt include Carnegie Mellon University.

Papers
More filters
Proceedings ArticleDOI
01 Dec 2000
TL;DR: The results show a significant relationship between delay in cross-site work and the degree to which remote colleagues are perceived to help out when workloads are heavy, particularly troubling in light of the finding that workers generally believed they were as helpful to their remote colleagues as to their local colleagues.
Abstract: Collaborations over distance must contend with the loss of the rich, subtle interactions that co-located teams use to coordinate their work. Previous research has suggested that one consequence of this loss is that cross-site work will take longer than comparable single-site work. We use both survey data and data from the change management system to measure the extent of delay in a multi-site software development organization. We also measure site interdependence, differences in same-site and cross-site communication patterns, and analyze the relationship of these variables to delay. Our results show a significant relationship between delay in cross-site work and the degree to which remote colleagues are perceived to help out when workloads are heavy. This result is particularly troubling in light of the finding that workers generally believed they were as helpful to their remote colleagues as to their local colleagues. We discuss implications of our findings for collaboration technology for distributed organizations.

445 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors consider how computer-based communication technology, specifically electronic group mail, might affect group behavior in organizations and propose a framework for analyzing groups formed by electronic distribution lists.
Abstract: This paper considers how computer-based communication technology, specifically electronic group mail, might affect group behavior in organizations. It proposes a framework for analyzing groups formed by electronic distribution lists. It describes the scope and nature of electronic group mail in one organization, illustrates how members of electronic distribution lists can exhibit fundamental group processes, and compares behavior in different kinds of electronic groups. It suggests that the electronic group at work is a new social phenomenon that may contribute importantly to organizational behavior.

438 citations

Proceedings ArticleDOI
01 Jul 2001
TL;DR: This work uses both survey data and data from the source code change management system to model the extent of delay in a multi-site software development organization, and investigates several possible mechanisms for this delay.
Abstract: Global software development is rapidly becoming the norm for technology companies. Previous qualitative research suggests that multi-site development may increase the development cycle time. We use both survey data and data from the source code change management system to model the extent of delay in a multi-site software development organization, and explore several possible mechanisms for this delay. We also measure differences in same-site and cross-site communication patterns, and analyze the relationship of these variables to delay. Our results show that, compared to same-site work, cross-site work takes much longer and requires more people for work of equal size and complexity. We also report a strong relationship between delay in cross-site work and the degree to which remote colleagues are perceived to help out when workloads are heavy. We discuss the implications of our findings for collaboration technology for distributed software development.

354 citations

Proceedings ArticleDOI
20 Apr 2002
TL;DR: The experiences of introducing an instant messaging and group chat application into geographically distributed workgroups encountered a dilemma that imposes serious challenges for user-centered design of groupware systems.
Abstract: We report on our experiences of introducing an instant messaging and group chat application into geographically distributed workgroups. We describe a number of issues we encountered, including privacy concerns, individual versus group training, and focusing on teams or individuals. The perception of the tool's utility was a complex issue, depending both on users' views of the importance of informal communication, and their perceptions of the nature of cross-site communication issues. Finally, we conclude with a discussion of critical mass, which is related to the features each user actually uses. More generally, we encountered a dilemma that imposes serious challenges for user-centered design of groupware systems

289 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Drawing from cross-case ethnographic studies of four US e-infrastructure projects for the earth and environmental sciences (cyberinfrastructure), this paper traces nine tensions as they are framed and articulated by participants.
Abstract: Designing e-infrastructure is work conducted today with an eye toward long-term sustainability. Participants in such development projects find themselves caught with one foot in the demands of the present and the other in a desired future. In this paper we seek to capture participants’ formulation of problems as they go about developing long-term information infrastructure. Drawing from cross-case ethnographic studies of four US e-infrastructure projects for the earth and environmental sciences (cyberinfrastructure), we trace nine tensions as they are framed and articulated by participants. To assist in understanding participants' orientations we abstract three concerns – motivating contribution, aligning end goals, and designing for use – which manifest themselves uniquely at each of the ‘scales of infrastructure': institutionalization, the organization of work, and enacting technology. The concept of "the long now" helps us understand that participants seek to simultaneously address all three concerns in long-term development endeavors.

278 citations


Cited by
More filters
Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors reviewed the history of computer mediated communication and found that impersonal communication is sometimes advantageous, and strategies for the intentional depersonalization of media use are inferred, with implications for Group Decision Support Systems effects.
Abstract: While computer-mediated communication use and research are proliferating rapidly, findings offer contrasting images regarding the interpersonal character of this technology. Research trends over the history of these media are reviewed with observations across trends suggested so as to provide integrative principles with which to apply media to different circumstances. First, the notion that the media reduce personal influences—their impersonal effects—is reviewed. Newer theories and research are noted explaining normative “interpersonal” uses of the media. From this vantage point, recognizing that impersonal communication is sometimes advantageous, strategies for the intentional depersonalization of media use are inferred, with implications for Group Decision Support Systems effects. Additionally, recognizing that media sometimes facilitate communication that surpasses normal interpersonal levels, a new perspective on “hyperpersonal” communication is introduced. Subprocesses are discussed pertaining to re...

4,401 citations

Book ChapterDOI
01 Jan 1991
TL;DR: The issues taken up here are: coordination of content, coordination of process, and how to update their common ground moment by moment.
Abstract: GROUNDING It takes two people working together to play a duet, shake hands, play chess, waltz, teach, or make love. To succeed, the two of them have to coordinate both the content and process of what they are doing. Alan and Barbara, on the piano, must come to play the same Mozart duet. This is coordination of content. They must also synchronize their entrances and exits, coordinate how loudly to play forte and pianissimo, and otherwise adjust to each other's tempo and dynamics. This is coordination of process. They cannot even begin to coordinate on content without assuming a vast amount of shared information or common ground-that is, mutual knowledge, mutual beliefs, and mutual assumptions And to coordinate on process, they need to update their common ground moment by moment. All collective actions are built on common ground and its accumulation. We thank many colleagues for discussion of the issues we take up here.

4,144 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The International Personality Item Pool (IPIP) as mentioned in this paper has been used as a prototype for public-domain personality measures, focusing on the International personality item pool, which has been widely used for personality measurement.

2,822 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors examined the assumptions, methods, and findings of such research and suggested that negative relational effects are confined to narrow situational boundary conditions and that communicators develop individuating impressions of others through accumulated CMC messages based upon these impressions, users may develop relationships and express multidimensional relational messages through verbal or textual cues.
Abstract: Several theories and much experimental research on relational tone in computer-mediated communication (CMC) points to the lack of nonverbal cues in this channel as a cause of impersonal and task-oriented messages. Field research in CMC often reports more positive relational behavior. This article examines the assumptions, methods, and findings of such research and suggests that negative relational effects are confined to narrow situational boundary conditions. Alternatively, it is suggested that communicators develop individuating impressions of others through accumulated CMC messages. Based upon these impressions, users may develop relationships and express multidimensional relational messages through verbal or textual cues. Predictions regarding these processes are suggested, and future research incorporating these points is urged.

2,376 citations