scispace - formally typeset
Search or ask a question
Author

Thomas H.J. Vaneker

Bio: Thomas H.J. Vaneker is an academic researcher from University of Twente. The author has contributed to research in topics: TRIZ & Product design. The author has an hindex of 13, co-authored 45 publications receiving 1309 citations.

Papers
More filters
Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In the case of aircraft components, AM technology enables low-volume manufacturing, easy integration of design changes and, at least as importantly, piece part reductions to greatly simplify product assembly.
Abstract: The past few decades have seen substantial growth in Additive Manufacturing (AM) technologies. However, this growth has mainly been process-driven. The evolution of engineering design to take advantage of the possibilities afforded by AM and to manage the constraints associated with the technology has lagged behind. This paper presents the major opportunities, constraints, and economic considerations for Design for Additive Manufacturing. It explores issues related to design and redesign for direct and indirect AM production. It also highlights key industrial applications, outlines future challenges, and identifies promising directions for research and the exploitation of AM's full potential in industry.

1,132 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors focus on process planning including build orientation, slicing, and path planning, as well as the definition of process parameter selection from a single track to multi-track and multilayer, and finally geometric features from a thinwall to lattice structures with several case studies.

173 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This paper presents a framework for DfAM methods and tools, subdivided into three distinct stages of product development: AM process selection, product redesign for functionality enhancement, and product optimization for the AM process chosen.

129 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors compared various destructive and non-destructive testing methods, ranging from global to local observation techniques and from quick low-cost to expensive time-consuming analyses.
Abstract: This study focuses on the comparison of porosity testing methods for the quality assessment of selective laser melted parts. Porosity is regarded as important quality indicator in metal additive manufacturing. Various destructive and non-destructive testing methods are compared, ranging from global to local observation techniques and from quick low-cost to expensive time-consuming analyses. Forty test specimens were produced using five varying control factors. The experimental results show that Archimedes and CT methods compare well, Archimedes can be deployed to inspect parts in small series and CT pre- and post-cut analysis show that post-cut porosity results are systematically higher

121 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors present a concept increasing the capacities of SMEs to capitalize on mass personalization via a collaborative network, which increases flexibility of production processes to fabricate products with a level of customization that resembles the era of crafts manufacturing.

74 citations


Cited by
More filters
Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors present a systematic analysis of the sustainability functions of Industry 4.0, including energy sustainability, harmful emission reduction, and social welfare improvement, and show that sophisticated precedence relationships exist among various sustainability functions.

664 citations

Book ChapterDOI
01 Nov 2015
TL;DR: In this article, the capabilities of additive manufacturing technologies provide an opportunity to rethink DFM to take advantage of the unique capabilities of these technologies, and several companies are now using AM technologies for production manufacturing.
Abstract: Design for manufacture and assembly (DFM) has typically meant that designers should tailor their designs to eliminate manufacturing difficulties and minimize manufacturing, assembly, and logistics costs. However, the capabilities of additive manufacturing technologies provide an opportunity to rethink DFM to take advantage of the unique capabilities of these technologies. As mentioned in Chap. 16, several companies are now using AM technologies for production manufacturing. For example, Siemens, Phonak, Widex, and the other hearing aid manufacturers use selective laser sintering and stereolithography machines to produce hearing aid shells; Align Technology uses stereolithography to fabricate molds for producing clear dental braces (“aligners”); and Boeing and its suppliers use polymer powder bed fusion (PBF) to produce ducts and similar parts for F-17 fighter jets. For hearing aids and dental aligners, AM machines enable manufacturing of tens to hundreds of thousands of parts, where each part is uniquely customized based upon person-specific geometric data. In the case of aircraft components, AM technology enables low-volume manufacturing, easy integration of design changes and, at least as importantly, piece part reductions to greatly simplify product assembly.

631 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the most significant process parameters considered as influencing FDM specimens' tensile, compression, flexural or impact strengths are discussed considering the results presented in the literature, and a necessary distinction between the mechanical properties of material and testing specimens and the mechanical behavior of a FDM end part is also made.

549 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, a comprehensive review on additive manufacturing technologies is presented together with both its contributions to Industry 4.0, focusing on three important aspects of AM: recent advances on material science, process development, and enhancements on design consideration.

497 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors highlight the range of 3D printed polymer-based, metal-metal, and metal-ceramic applications while discussing advantages and challenges with additively manufactured multi-material structures.
Abstract: Additive manufacturing (AM) or 3D printing has revolutionized the manufacturing world through its rapid and geometrically-intricate capabilities as well as economic benefits. Countless businesses in automotive, aerospace, medical, and even food industries have adopted this approach over the past decade. Though this revolution has sparked widespread innovation with single material usage, the manufacturing world is constantly evolving. 3D printers now have the capability to create multi-material systems with performance improvements in user-definable locations. This means throughout a single component, properties like hardness, corrosion resistance, and environmental adaptation can be defined in areas that require it the most. These new processes allow for exciting multifunctional parts to be built that were never possible through traditional, single material AM processes. AM of metals, ceramics, and polymers is currently being evaluated to combine multiple materials in one operation and has already produced never-before-produced parts. While multi-material AM is still in its infancy, researchers are shifting their mindset toward this unique approach showing that the technology is beginning to advance past a research and development stage into real-world applications. This review is intended to highlight the range of 3D printed polymer-based, metal-metal, and metal-ceramic applications while discussing advantages and challenges with additively manufactured multi-material structures.

483 citations