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Thomas S. Huang

Bio: Thomas S. Huang is an academic researcher from University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign. The author has contributed to research in topics: Motion estimation & Facial recognition system. The author has an hindex of 146, co-authored 1299 publications receiving 101564 citations. Previous affiliations of Thomas S. Huang include Alcatel-Lucent & National Academy of Engineering.


Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This paper presents a new approach to single-image superresolution, based upon sparse signal representation, which generates high-resolution images that are competitive or even superior in quality to images produced by other similar SR methods.
Abstract: This paper presents a new approach to single-image superresolution, based upon sparse signal representation. Research on image statistics suggests that image patches can be well-represented as a sparse linear combination of elements from an appropriately chosen over-complete dictionary. Inspired by this observation, we seek a sparse representation for each patch of the low-resolution input, and then use the coefficients of this representation to generate the high-resolution output. Theoretical results from compressed sensing suggest that under mild conditions, the sparse representation can be correctly recovered from the downsampled signals. By jointly training two dictionaries for the low- and high-resolution image patches, we can enforce the similarity of sparse representations between the low-resolution and high-resolution image patch pair with respect to their own dictionaries. Therefore, the sparse representation of a low-resolution image patch can be applied with the high-resolution image patch dictionary to generate a high-resolution image patch. The learned dictionary pair is a more compact representation of the patch pairs, compared to previous approaches, which simply sample a large amount of image patch pairs , reducing the computational cost substantially. The effectiveness of such a sparsity prior is demonstrated for both general image super-resolution (SR) and the special case of face hallucination. In both cases, our algorithm generates high-resolution images that are competitive or even superior in quality to images produced by other similar SR methods. In addition, the local sparse modeling of our approach is naturally robust to noise, and therefore the proposed algorithm can handle SR with noisy inputs in a more unified framework.

4,958 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: An algorithm for finding the least-squares solution of R and T, which is based on the singular value decomposition (SVD) of a 3 × 3 matrix, is presented.
Abstract: Two point sets {pi} and {p'i}; i = 1, 2,..., N are related by p'i = Rpi + T + Ni, where R is a rotation matrix, T a translation vector, and Ni a noise vector. Given {pi} and {p'i}, we present an algorithm for finding the least-squares solution of R and T, which is based on the singular value decomposition (SVD) of a 3 × 3 matrix. This new algorithm is compared to two earlier algorithms with respect to computer time requirements.

3,862 citations

Proceedings ArticleDOI
13 Jun 2010
TL;DR: This paper presents a simple but effective coding scheme called Locality-constrained Linear Coding (LLC) in place of the VQ coding in traditional SPM, using the locality constraints to project each descriptor into its local-coordinate system, and the projected coordinates are integrated by max pooling to generate the final representation.
Abstract: The traditional SPM approach based on bag-of-features (BoF) requires nonlinear classifiers to achieve good image classification performance. This paper presents a simple but effective coding scheme called Locality-constrained Linear Coding (LLC) in place of the VQ coding in traditional SPM. LLC utilizes the locality constraints to project each descriptor into its local-coordinate system, and the projected coordinates are integrated by max pooling to generate the final representation. With linear classifier, the proposed approach performs remarkably better than the traditional nonlinear SPM, achieving state-of-the-art performance on several benchmarks. Compared with the sparse coding strategy [22], the objective function used by LLC has an analytical solution. In addition, the paper proposes a fast approximated LLC method by first performing a K-nearest-neighbor search and then solving a constrained least square fitting problem, bearing computational complexity of O(M + K2). Hence even with very large codebooks, our system can still process multiple frames per second. This efficiency significantly adds to the practical values of LLC for real applications.

3,307 citations

Proceedings ArticleDOI
20 Jun 2009
TL;DR: An extension of the SPM method is developed, by generalizing vector quantization to sparse coding followed by multi-scale spatial max pooling, and a linear SPM kernel based on SIFT sparse codes is proposed, leading to state-of-the-art performance on several benchmarks by using a single type of descriptors.
Abstract: Recently SVMs using spatial pyramid matching (SPM) kernel have been highly successful in image classification. Despite its popularity, these nonlinear SVMs have a complexity O(n2 ~ n3) in training and O(n) in testing, where n is the training size, implying that it is nontrivial to scaleup the algorithms to handle more than thousands of training images. In this paper we develop an extension of the SPM method, by generalizing vector quantization to sparse coding followed by multi-scale spatial max pooling, and propose a linear SPM kernel based on SIFT sparse codes. This new approach remarkably reduces the complexity of SVMs to O(n) in training and a constant in testing. In a number of image categorization experiments, we find that, in terms of classification accuracy, the suggested linear SPM based on sparse coding of SIFT descriptors always significantly outperforms the linear SPM kernel on histograms, and is even better than the nonlinear SPM kernels, leading to state-of-the-art performance on several benchmarks by using a single type of descriptors.

3,017 citations

01 Nov 1971
TL;DR: Parts of image processing are discussed--specifically: the mathematical operations one is likely to encounter, and ways of implementing them by optics and on digital computers; image description; and image quality evaluation.
Abstract: Image processing techniques find applications in many areas, chief among which are image enhancement, pattern recognition, and efficient picture coding. Some aspects of image processing are discussed--specifically: the mathematical operations one is likely to encounter, and ways of implementing them by optics and on digital computers; image description; and image quality evaluation. Many old results are reviewed, some new ones presented, and several open questions are posed.

2,961 citations


Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A new criterion for triggering the extension of word hits, combined with a new heuristic for generating gapped alignments, yields a gapped BLAST program that runs at approximately three times the speed of the original.
Abstract: The BLAST programs are widely used tools for searching protein and DNA databases for sequence similarities. For protein comparisons, a variety of definitional, algorithmic and statistical refinements described here permits the execution time of the BLAST programs to be decreased substantially while enhancing their sensitivity to weak similarities. A new criterion for triggering the extension of word hits, combined with a new heuristic for generating gapped alignments, yields a gapped BLAST program that runs at approximately three times the speed of the original. In addition, a method is introduced for automatically combining statistically significant alignments produced by BLAST into a position-specific score matrix, and searching the database using this matrix. The resulting Position-Specific Iterated BLAST (PSIBLAST) program runs at approximately the same speed per iteration as gapped BLAST, but in many cases is much more sensitive to weak but biologically relevant sequence similarities. PSI-BLAST is used to uncover several new and interesting members of the BRCT superfamily.

70,111 citations

Proceedings ArticleDOI
07 Jun 2015
TL;DR: Inception as mentioned in this paper is a deep convolutional neural network architecture that achieves the new state of the art for classification and detection in the ImageNet Large-Scale Visual Recognition Challenge 2014 (ILSVRC14).
Abstract: We propose a deep convolutional neural network architecture codenamed Inception that achieves the new state of the art for classification and detection in the ImageNet Large-Scale Visual Recognition Challenge 2014 (ILSVRC14). The main hallmark of this architecture is the improved utilization of the computing resources inside the network. By a carefully crafted design, we increased the depth and width of the network while keeping the computational budget constant. To optimize quality, the architectural decisions were based on the Hebbian principle and the intuition of multi-scale processing. One particular incarnation used in our submission for ILSVRC14 is called GoogLeNet, a 22 layers deep network, the quality of which is assessed in the context of classification and detection.

40,257 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The ImageNet Large Scale Visual Recognition Challenge (ILSVRC) as mentioned in this paper is a benchmark in object category classification and detection on hundreds of object categories and millions of images, which has been run annually from 2010 to present, attracting participation from more than fifty institutions.
Abstract: The ImageNet Large Scale Visual Recognition Challenge is a benchmark in object category classification and detection on hundreds of object categories and millions of images. The challenge has been run annually from 2010 to present, attracting participation from more than fifty institutions. This paper describes the creation of this benchmark dataset and the advances in object recognition that have been possible as a result. We discuss the challenges of collecting large-scale ground truth annotation, highlight key breakthroughs in categorical object recognition, provide a detailed analysis of the current state of the field of large-scale image classification and object detection, and compare the state-of-the-art computer vision accuracy with human accuracy. We conclude with lessons learned in the 5 years of the challenge, and propose future directions and improvements.

30,811 citations

Proceedings ArticleDOI
23 Jun 2014
TL;DR: RCNN as discussed by the authors combines CNNs with bottom-up region proposals to localize and segment objects, and when labeled training data is scarce, supervised pre-training for an auxiliary task, followed by domain-specific fine-tuning, yields a significant performance boost.
Abstract: Object detection performance, as measured on the canonical PASCAL VOC dataset, has plateaued in the last few years. The best-performing methods are complex ensemble systems that typically combine multiple low-level image features with high-level context. In this paper, we propose a simple and scalable detection algorithm that improves mean average precision (mAP) by more than 30% relative to the previous best result on VOC 2012 -- achieving a mAP of 53.3%. Our approach combines two key insights: (1) one can apply high-capacity convolutional neural networks (CNNs) to bottom-up region proposals in order to localize and segment objects and (2) when labeled training data is scarce, supervised pre-training for an auxiliary task, followed by domain-specific fine-tuning, yields a significant performance boost. Since we combine region proposals with CNNs, we call our method R-CNN: Regions with CNN features. We also present experiments that provide insight into what the network learns, revealing a rich hierarchy of image features. Source code for the complete system is available at http://www.cs.berkeley.edu/~rbg/rcnn.

21,729 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
Paul J. Besl1, H.D. McKay1
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors describe a general-purpose representation-independent method for the accurate and computationally efficient registration of 3D shapes including free-form curves and surfaces, based on the iterative closest point (ICP) algorithm, which requires only a procedure to find the closest point on a geometric entity to a given point.
Abstract: The authors describe a general-purpose, representation-independent method for the accurate and computationally efficient registration of 3-D shapes including free-form curves and surfaces. The method handles the full six degrees of freedom and is based on the iterative closest point (ICP) algorithm, which requires only a procedure to find the closest point on a geometric entity to a given point. The ICP algorithm always converges monotonically to the nearest local minimum of a mean-square distance metric, and the rate of convergence is rapid during the first few iterations. Therefore, given an adequate set of initial rotations and translations for a particular class of objects with a certain level of 'shape complexity', one can globally minimize the mean-square distance metric over all six degrees of freedom by testing each initial registration. One important application of this method is to register sensed data from unfixtured rigid objects with an ideal geometric model, prior to shape inspection. Experimental results show the capabilities of the registration algorithm on point sets, curves, and surfaces. >

17,598 citations