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Tiffany T.E. Johnstone

Bio: Tiffany T.E. Johnstone is an academic researcher. The author has contributed to research in topics: Conceptual metaphor. The author has an hindex of 1, co-authored 1 publications receiving 29 citations.

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DOI
01 Jan 2012
TL;DR: The authors identify a genre of travel writing that they refer to as frontier revival literature, which is particularly important in negotiating North American ideas of imperialism, nationality, citizenship, gender, and race from 1880-1930.
Abstract: In this dissertation, I identify a genre of travel writing that I refer to as frontier revival literature, which I show to be particularly important in negotiating North American ideas of imperialism, nationality, citizenship, gender, and race from 1880-1930. Meaning about cultural identity emerges through motifs of physical movement in frontier revival literature. I focus on how female frontier revival authors appropriate familiar motifs of frontier revival literature to promote women’s rights. Frontier revival literature consists of tourist accounts of travel in western Canada by Canadian and American authors who published in northeastern American cities and who wrote for a largely eastern, urban audience. I show how male frontier revival literature authors use American manifest destiny rhetoric in a western Canadian setting to promote ideas of an intercontinental west that, despite seeming to broadly represent North American progress, are highly gendered and racialized. I combine and adapt elements of feminist and conceptual metaphor theory as a way of reading how women writers of the frontier revival debate such ideas through representations of physical movement. I build on a diverse range of feminist theory to examine how images of the travelling female body negotiate and often contest dominant ideological messages about cultural identity in travel literature by men. I develop conceptual metaphor theory in order to identify a network of metaphors that I see as emerging in frontier revival literature. Focussing on three different chronological stages of frontier revival literature, I apply my methodology in comparative close readings of the following texts by Canadian and American authors: Sara Jeannette Duncan’s A Social Departure: How Orthodocia and I Went Around the

29 citations


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TL;DR: In this paper, Imagined communities: Reflections on the origin and spread of nationalism are discussed. And the history of European ideas: Vol. 21, No. 5, pp. 721-722.

13,842 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors present the various sides of each issue in a remarkably balanced manner and provide just the right amount of detail in each discussion to suggest further avenues of study for anyone inclined to pursue them.
Abstract: explanations for the public’s—some say inordinate—fear of radiation. One small disappointment is the occasional weak handling of technical matters. In particular, the explanations of the quantities and units related to radiation dose (e.g., rad and rem) are sometimes misleading or incorrect. Better, but still inadequate in my opinion, is the treatment of the effective-dose-equivalent concept. The latter is the method employed by the radiation-protection community that equates a given dose for an individual tissue or organ (such as the thyroid) to the smaller uniform whole-body dose that carries the same risk. Ironically, a misunderstanding of this method led to the widespread belief, described by Walker, that the NRC’s adoption of the effective-dose equivalent represented a relaxation of the exposure limits. My disappointment is minor, however. Walker is an excellent writer. His prose is clear, and the narrative develops a nice momentum that carries the reader along. Personal opinion is kept in the background while the author presents the various sides of each issue in a remarkably balanced manner. Just the right amount of detail is provided in each discussion to suggest further avenues of study for anyone inclined to pursue them. Depending on one’s reading habits, this informative and enjoyable book could be consumed easily in one or two sittings. Indeed, I found the time I devoted to it sufficiently well spent that I am tracking down the first two volumes in the series to discover what I have been missing.

46 citations