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Tim Greenwood

Bio: Tim Greenwood is an academic researcher from University of St Andrews. The author has contributed to research in topics: Armenian & Late Antiquity. The author has an hindex of 8, co-authored 16 publications receiving 451 citations.

Papers
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Book
01 Jan 1999
TL;DR: The History attributed to Sebeos is one of the major works of early Armenian historiography as mentioned in this paper, which traces the fortunes of Armenia in the sixth and seventh centuries within the broader framework of the Byzantine-Sasanian conflict.
Abstract: The History attributed to Sebeos is one of the major works of early Armenian historiography. Although anonymous, it was written in the middle of the seventh century, a time when comparable chronicles in Greek and Syriac are sparse. Sebeos traces the fortunes of Armenia in the sixth and seventh centuries within the broader framework of the Byzantine-Sasanian conflict. Comprising two volumes, part 1 (240 pages) is the translation and notes followed by part 2 (216 pages) which contains the historical commentary, this excellent publication will be of interest to all those involved in the study of Armenia, the Caucasus, the Eastern Roman Empire and the Middle East in late antiquity. It will be of particular value to Islamicists, since Sebeos not only sets the scene for the coming of Islam, but provides the only substantial non-Muslim account of the initial period of expansion.

200 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
01 Jan 2004

63 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The Anonymous Chronicle as mentioned in this paper is a little-studied Armenian text, compiled between September 686 and 689/690 c. It comprises two parts, both translated from unknown Greek texts.
Abstract: The Anonymous Chronicle is a little-studied Armenian text, compiled between September 686 and 689/690 c.e. It comprises two parts, both translated from unknown Greek texts. The first is an epitomized universal chronicle related to the missing Chronography of Annianus of Alexandria. Remarkably it appears to preserve the lost Roman imperial sequence from Eusebius's Chronographia . The second is a synoptic ecclesiastical history, written from a miaphysite perspective. It records all six Ecumenical Councils, often supplying new details. Conditions in mid-sixth-century Jerusalem and a new tradition associated with St Simeon Stylites also feature. Its conclusion supports the proposition that monotheletism proved to be of much greater significance among Armenians than previously recognized. The study is prefaced by an investigation of the Armenian version of Eusebius's Chronicle and a call for its diminished standing to be re-evaluated.

53 citations

Journal ArticleDOI

52 citations

Book ChapterDOI
01 Jan 2009

42 citations


Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The first book of its kind, the authors, provides a richly informative and comprehensive guide to the world of late antiquity with the latest scholarship to the researcher along with great reading pleasure to the browser.
Abstract: The first book of its kind, this richly informative and comprehensive guide to the world of late antiquity offers the latest scholarship to the researcher along with great reading pleasure to the browser. In eleven comprehensive essays and in over 500 encyclopedic entries, an international cast of experts provides essential information and fresh perspectives on the history and culture of an era marked by the rise of two world religions, unprecedented political upheavals that remade the map of the known world, and the creation of art of enduring glory. By extending the commonly accepted chronological and territorial boundaries of the period--to encompass Roman, Byzantine, Sassanian, and early Islamic cultures, from the middle of the third century to the end of the eighth--this guide makes new connections and permits revealing comparisons. Consult the article on \"Angels\" and discover their meaning in Islamic as well as classical and Judeo-Christian traditions. Refer to \"Children,\" \"Concubinage,\" and \"Divorce\" for a fascinating interweaving of information on the family. Read the essay on \"Barbarians and Ethnicity\" and see how a topic as current as the construction of identity played out in earlier times, from the Greeks and Romans to the Turks, Huns, and Saxons. Turn to \"Empire Building\" to learn how the empire of Constantine was supported by architecture and ceremony. Or follow your own path through the broad range of entries on politics, manufacturing and commerce, the arts, philosophy, religion, geography, ethnicity, and domestic life. Each entry introduces readers to another facet of the postclassical world: historic figures and places, institutions, burial customs, food, money, public life, and amusements. A splendid selection of illustrations enhances the portrait. The intriguing era of late antiquity emerges completely and clearly, viewed in a new light, in a guide that will be relished by scholars and general readers alike.

203 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Early Christian art - Rome and the legacy of the caesars early Christian art as discussed by the authors, the eastern provinces of the empire and the foundation of Constantinople early Christ art - the synthesis of the secular and the religious image the age of Justinian the forsaken west and the emergence of the supreme pontiff the troubled east the triumph of orthodoxy the scholar of orthodoxy, the scholar emperor and the imperial ideal metropolitan authority metropolitan diffusion and decline.
Abstract: Early Christian art - Rome and the legacy of the caesars early Christian art - the eastern provinces of the empire and the foundation of Constantinople early Christian art - the synthesis of the secular and the religious image the age of Justinian the forsaken west and the emergence of the supreme pontiff the troubled east the triumph of orthodoxy the scholar of orthodoxy the scholar emperor and the triumph of the imperial ideal metropolitan authority metropolitan diffusion and decline.

175 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the government and the people in Byzantine Ephesus were discussed, from Diocletian to Heraclius, public works and public services, Pagans, Christians and Jews.
Abstract: Preface Part I. Late Antique Ephesus: 1. From Diocletian to Heraclius 2. The government and the people 3. Public works and public services 4. Pagans, Christians and Jews 5. The material remains 6. Ephesus in Late Antiquity Part II. Byzantine Ephesus: 7. The Dark Ages 8. Medieval recovery c. 850-1304 Part III. Turkish Ephesus: 9. The emirate of Aydin: 1304-1425 10. The Ottoman period: 1425-1863 Appendices Short titles and abbreviations Bibliography Index.

153 citations

Book
13 Sep 2007
TL;DR: Rome and Iran to the beginning of the third century AD as mentioned in this paper, a chronological survey of the Sasanian Empire and its relations with the Roman Empire, is presented in this book.
Abstract: Part I. Narrative: 1. Rome and Iran to the beginning of the third century AD 2. Rome and the Sasanian Empire - a chronological survey Part II. Sources and Contexts: 3. Political goals 4. Warfare 5. Military confrontations 6. The diplomatic solutions 7. Arabia between the great powers 8. Shared interests - continuing conflicts 9. Religion - Christianity and Zoroastrianism 10. Emperor and King of Kings 11. Exchange of information between West and East Part III. Appendices.

132 citations