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Tim Stephens

Bio: Tim Stephens is an academic researcher from University of the Arts London. The author has co-authored 1 publications.

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TL;DR: In this article, the authors present a meditative enquiry on the materiality of being in the present moment, where the author argues that our presence is continuous, whether or not we are aware of being present.
Abstract: The article consists of two parts, Introduction and/or Conclusion and a Meditative Enquiry, to be read in any order, if indeed we do ‘read’ meditative enquiry. Meditative enquiry here concerns the meditative writing and/or reading of this article on presence. The enquiry is divided into numerous subheadings that encourage a slow and circular, rather than linear, narrative, and a participative reading approach, in which each section aims to return to, or arrive in, the present moment. The materiality of our presence is continuous, whether or not we are conscious of being in the present. The article also enacts resistance to, or an apparent inability of conscious awareness to arrive in, and stay with, what is happening in this moment. Implications are, firstly, the unmaking of: a qualitative researcher-participant’s ‘Self’; and the autoethnographic self within writing as creative practice. Secondly, validating a dual contribution of meditation to philosophy and writing on presence.

2 citations


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TL;DR: In this article , the authors explore how the experience of non-self might differ from but overlap with emptiness in the history of art specifically "photography theory and practice" and explore the complexities of nonrepresentation when articulating embodied affect, of childhood racial discrimination, for instance.
Abstract: Non-self has unsurprisingly been featured very little in explanatory material of-object-based contemporary art history. Buddhist nonself has contributed to subjectivity research, but non-self in photography is, perhaps appropriately, absent. This chapter will explore how the experience of non-self might differ from but overlap with emptiness in the ‘history of art' specifically ‘photography theory and practice.' The author's research in experiential non-self wrestles with the complexities of non-representation when articulating embodied affect, of childhood racial discrimination, for instance. Yet, embodied autobiographical non-self is an impossible category. This is a subjugated knowledge that disrupts self-hood, undermines historical artefacts -leaving us with no birth of photography- and ruptures socio-cultural identity. Can a contemporary secular Buddhist non-self function as liberatory? Photographic non-self might render ‘writing on/and photography' disastrous, when indelibly marked by the failures of representation.
Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article , an autoethnographic quadrologue is presented to convey the struggles and peculiarities of meditation practice and the research process leading to the decision to employ an auto-ethnography paradigm.
Abstract: In this autoethnographic quadrologue, the authors aim to show how meditation experiences defy verbalization in a qualitative research setting. This leads to the insight that an autoethnographic approach may be a much better fit for such an experience, where complex and inexpressible things can be found. This is especially the case since autoethnographic texts include and immerse the reader in the experience. Even though in the case of meditation this can hardly be achieved, this quadrologue aims at conveying some of the struggles and peculiarities of meditation practice. It focuses on the research process leading to the decision to employ an autoethnography paradigm. Thus, the focus of this article is the differentiation of autoethnography from other methodological approaches and the conscious decision in favour of this method, which is rather unusual in German-speaking countries. The authors develop the thesis that both the meditation experience and the decision to employ an autoethnographic paradigm led to the experience of “wandering off the beaten track” and crossing the boundaries of what is usually done in society and social science respectively.