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Tim Unwin

Bio: Tim Unwin is an academic researcher from University of London. The author has contributed to research in topics: Consumer behaviour & Wine bottle. The author has an hindex of 8, co-authored 18 publications receiving 377 citations.

Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
Tim Unwin1
TL;DR: In this article, the authors provide a critique of recent attempts to use hedonic price techniques for understanding market prices of wines, and suggest that such attempts are flawed for four main reasons: difficulties in identifying the most appropriate variables to use; uncertainty over the aims of such methods; problems in the definitions of wine quality; and internal inconsistencies.
Abstract: This paper provides a critique of recent attempts to use hedonic price techniques for understanding market prices of wines. It suggests that such attempts are flawed for four main reasons: difficulties in identifying the most appropriate variables to use; uncertainty over the aims of such methods; problems in the definitions of wine quality; and internal inconsistencies. Much further research is required on consumer behaviour with respect to wine, before it will be possible to comment with any certainty about the factors influencing people's perceptions of wine quality and their effects on price.

107 citations

Journal Article
TL;DR: This article conducted an exploratory study of consumer responses to the information contained on wine bottle back labels and found that experienced consumers have difficulty in matching the tastes of wines with their back label descriptions.
Abstract: This paper reports on an exploratory study of consumer responses to the information contained on wine bottle back labels. It was based on research conducted with respondents in Australia in early 1999. Its central findings were: (1) that experienced consumers have difficulty in matching the tastes of wines with their back label descriptions; (2) that 57% of the respondents claim regularly to read back labels in making their purchasing decisions; (3) that the information they found most useful in helping them to identify the wines was simple descriptions of the tastes or smells of the wines; and (4) that it is difficult to draw general conclusions about the effects of gender, age, income or occupation on such responses.

104 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This paper conducted an exploratory study of consumer responses to the information contained on wine bottle back labels and found that experienced consumers have difficulty in matching the tastes of wines with their back label descriptions.
Abstract: This paper reports on an exploratory study of consumer responses to the information contained on wine bottle back labels. It was based on research conducted with respondents in Australia in early 1999. Its central findings were: (1) that experienced consumers have difficulty in matching the tastes of wines with their back label descriptions; (2) that 57% of the respondents claim regularly to read back labels in making their purchasing decisions; (3) that the information they found most useful in helping them to identify the wines was simple descriptions of the tastes or smells of the wines; and (4) that it is difficult to draw general conclusions about the effects of gender, age, income or occupation on such responses.

81 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
Tim Unwin1
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors present the summary findings of a survey of employers' attitudes towards geography graduates from universities in Britain and their main conclusions are that geography departments should encourage the broader "vocational" education and involvement of their undergraduates and urgently need to introduce a wider range of teaching methods.
Abstract: This paper presents the summary findings of a survey of employers' attitudes towards geography graduates from universities in Britain. Its main conclusions are that geography departments should encourage the broader ‘vocational’ education and involvement of their undergraduates and urgently need to introduce a wider range of teaching methods. It is suggested that this is unlikely to happen at a time of increasing cuts in government spending on higher education.

14 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
Tim Unwin1
TL;DR: The findings of a preliminary survey of the images people associate with beer, wine and spirits, and also with spirits, suggest that perceptions of different types of alcoholic beverage are different.
Abstract: This paper examines perceptions of different types of alcoholic beverage It reports the findings of a preliminary survey of the images people associate with beer, wine and spirits, and also with t

14 citations


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TL;DR: In this article, the authors estimate hedonic price functions for premium wine from Australia and New Zealand, differentiating implicit prices for sensory quality ratings, wine varieties and regional as well as winery brand reputations over the vintages 1992-2000.
Abstract: We estimate hedonic price functions for premium wine from Australia and New Zealand, differentiating implicit prices for sensory quality ratings, wine varieties and regional as well as winery brand reputations over the vintages 1992-2000. The results show regional reputations have become increasingly differentiated through time (although less so for New Zealand). In particular, cool-climate regions are becoming increasingly preferred over other regions in Australia. In each country, price premia associated with both James Halliday's and Winestate magazine's sensory quality ratings, and with Halliday's winery ratings and classic wine designations, are highly significant.

307 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A review of sound and shape symbolism in food and beverages can be found in this paper, where a variety of robust cross-modal correspondences between sounds and shapes, and the sensory attributes (specifically the taste, flavor, aroma, and oral-somatosensory attributes) of various foods and beverages are reviewed.

295 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors estimate hedonic price functions for premium wine from Australia and New Zealand, differentiating implicit prices for sensory quality ratings, wine varieties and regional as well as winery brand reputations over the vintages 1992-2000.
Abstract: We estimate hedonic price functions for premium wine from Australia and New Zealand, differentiating implicit prices for sensory quality ratings, wine varieties and regional as well as winery brand reputations over the vintages 1992–2000. The results show regional reputations have become increasingly differentiated through time (although less so for New Zealand). In particular, cool-climate regions are becoming increasingly preferred over other regions in Australia. In each country, price premia associated with both James Halliday's and Winestate magazine's sensory quality ratings, and with Halliday's winery ratings and classic wine designations, are highly significant.

268 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the combination of spatial modelling and geographical information system (GIS) data can update the concept of terroir provided the area, scale and resolution of each so-called terroIR unit are more carefully specified and fully related to viticultural data.
Abstract: Terroir has many facets. It has been related to: variety of plants and typical food products; territory, name, strategies of advertising and marketing. A viticultural terroir is seldom defined as a region which is related to a particular area with a distinct quality of grapes and their wines. The scale of analysis of the few available discussions by area range from local to a broad spatial coverage: ' local functional ' approaches emphasise quality controlled by ecology and physiology; ' spatial ' approaches depend on the diversity of viticultural environments from area to area. The combination of spatial modelling and geographical information system (GIS) data can update the concept of terroir provided the area, scale and resolution of each so-called terroir -unit are more carefully specified and fully related to viticultural data.

254 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors demonstrate that the certification of environmental practices by a third party should be analyzed as a strategy distinct from the disclosure of the eco-certification through a label posted on the product.
Abstract: Although there is increasing use of eco-labeling, conditions under which eco-labels can command price premiums are not fully understood. In this article, we demonstrate that the certification of environmental practices by a third party should be analyzed as a strategy distinct from—although related to—the disclosure of the eco-certification through a label posted on the product. By assessing eco-labeling and eco-certification strategies separately, researchers can identify benefits associated with the certification process, such as improved reputation in the industry or increased product quality, independently from those associated with the actual label. In the context of the wine industry, we show that eco-certification leads to a price premium while the use of the eco-label does not.

235 citations