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Timo Rissanen

Bio: Timo Rissanen is an academic researcher from The New School. The author has contributed to research in topics: Fashion design & Clothing. The author has an hindex of 8, co-authored 15 publications receiving 394 citations.

Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
07 Apr 2020
TL;DR: In this article, the authors identify the environmental impacts at critical points in the textile and fashion value chain, from production to consumption, focusing on water use, chemical pollution, CO2 emissions and textile waste.
Abstract: The fashion industry is facing increasing global scrutiny of its environmentally polluting supply chain operations. Despite the widely publicized environmental impacts, however, the industry continues to grow, in part due to the rise of fast fashion, which relies on cheap manufacturing, frequent consumption and short-lived garment use. In this Review, we identify the environmental impacts at critical points in the textile and fashion value chain, from production to consumption, focusing on water use, chemical pollution, CO2 emissions and textile waste. Impacts from the fashion industry include over 92 million tonnes of waste produced per year and 79 trillion litres of water consumed. On the basis of these environmental impacts, we outline the need for fundamental changes in the fashion business model, including a deceleration of manufacturing and the introduction of sustainable practices throughout the supply chain, as well a shift in consumer behaviour — namely, decreasing clothing purchases and increasing garment lifetimes. These changes stress the need for an urgent transition back to ‘slow’ fashion, minimizing and mitigating the detrimental environmental impacts, so as to improve the long-term sustainability of the fashion supply chain. The increase in clothing consumption, exemplified in fast fashion, has severe environmental consequences. This Review discusses the impacts of fashion on natural resources and the environment, and examines how technology, policy and consumer behaviour can mitigate the negative effects of the fashion industry.

373 citations

BookDOI
25 Jun 2012
TL;DR: In this article, the authors provide a practical guide to the ways in which designers are creating fashion with less waste and greater durability, based on the results of extensive research into lifecycle approaches to sustainable fashion.
Abstract: The production, use and eventual disposal of most clothing is environmentally damaging, and many fashion and textile designers are becoming keen to employ more sustainable strategies in their work. This book provides a practical guide to the ways in which designers are creating fashion with less waste and greater durability. Based on the results of extensive research into lifecycle approaches to sustainable fashion, the book is divided into four sections: source: explores the motivations for the selection of materials for fashion garments and suggests that garments can be made from materials that also assist in the management of textile waste make: discusses the differing approaches to the design and manufacture of sustainable fashion garments that can also provide the opportunity for waste control and minimization use: explores schemes that encourage the consumer to engage in slow fashion consumption last: examines alternative solutions to the predictable fate of most garments – landfill. Illustrated throughout with case studies of best practice from international designers and fashion labels and written in a practical, accessible style, this is a must-have guide for fashion and textile designers and students in their areas.

124 citations

Dissertation
01 Jan 2013
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors examined the opportunities for creating zero-waste garments within contemporary menswear fashion design practice using cut-and-sew methods and found that fashion design is part of a larger picture of beauty for everyone, that fashion is capable of being the source of.
Abstract: This thesis examines zero-waste fashion design: design activity that results in zero-waste garments. Conventional design approaches waste approximately 15 per cent of the fabric used in the design and make of a cut and sew garment. The responsibility for this wastage belongs with manufacture, which is constrained by what has already been designed and pattern cut. The economic systems that underpin fashion design and manufacture are such that there is little economic incentive to be concerned with this wastage. An examination of the material and social investments embodied in fabrics alongside their environmental impacts, reveals that these investments are wasted in the wasted fabric. The context of this study is contemporary fashion design within the ready-to-wear industry: fashion design that leads to the manufacturing of multiples of one design. The contextual review of this study examines different methods of fashion creation. Design ideation tools and the relationship between fashion design and pattern cutting in current industry provide the frame for design practice in this study, together with an analysis of historical and contemporary zero-waste and less-waste garments. Findings from the contextual review frame a series of briefs for design experiments. This study asks: What are the opportunities for creating zero-waste garments within contemporary menswear fashion design practice using cut and sew methods? Fashion design practice is the primary research tool in this study. Design processes and their outcomes are documented in a journal, and the journals are transcribed and analysed. Successful strategies for zero-waste fashion design, emerging from the data, are presented. Pattern cutting emerges as integral to zero-waste fashion design. Zero-waste fashion design is examined in relation to fashion manufacture, as particular manufacturing issues such as fabric as material, and the grading of garment patterns to achieve size ranges of garments, create new kinds of opportunities for zero-waste fashion design. This study also asks: To what extent is a zero-waste approach feasible and desirable within contemporary fashion industry? This study demonstrates that zero-waste fashion design generates new opportunities for fashion design to engage with fashion manufacture that may not currently exist. This study calls for fashion design to consider pattern cutting an integral part of the fashion design process. Such an approach to fashion design creates new opportunities for the fashion industry and fashion design education. Zero-waste fashion design is part of a larger picture of beauty for everyone, that fashion is capable of being the source of.

78 citations

Book
28 Jan 2016
TL;DR: In this article, the design ideation toolbox for zero waste fashion design is presented, along with guidelines for zero-waste fashion design from history to now Textile waste zero waste over time.
Abstract: Table of content Preface 1. Zero waste fashion design from history to now Textile waste Zero waste over time Modern zero waste fashion design Interview with Maja Stabel, fashion designer (Norway) Short cuts 2. Pattern cutting as a fashion design tool Fashion design and pattern cutting Creative pattern cutting Interview with Winifred Aldrich, fashion author (UK) Interview with Rickard Lindqvist, fashion designer (Sweden) Creative pattern cutters from around the world Patterns in design ideation Short cuts 3. Zero waste fashion design: the basics Criteria for zero waste fashion design The design ideation toolbox Zero waste blocks Trapeze sleeveless tunic by Holly McQuillan, fashion designer and lecturer (New Zealand) Endurance skirt by Timo Rissanen, Finland-born, Australia based fashion designer and lecturer (Australia) Tailored jacket by Holly McQuillan Pattern set ups by Holly McQuillan Adapting an existing design for zero waste Risky design practice Designing with the fabric width Short cuts 4. Zero waste fashion design and CAD Marker making as design activity Advantages of digital design for zero waste fashion Zero waste tutorials through CAD Grading and CAD Combining digital technologies Zero waste and digital textile design Interview with Julia Lumsden, fashion designer (New Zealand) Short cuts 5. Manufacturing zero---waste garments Fashion design and fashion manufacturing Interview with Lela Jacobs, fashion designer (New Zealand) Sizing zero waste garments Fabric in manufacturing zero waste garments Tara St James of Study NY Short cuts 6 Zero waste fashion design: getting started On inspiration Interview with Kia Koski, fashion design scholar (Finland) Documenting and reflecting on design On sharing Conversation with Yeohlee Teng, Malaysian-born, New York-based fashion designer (US) Futures for zero waste fashion design Short cuts Glossary References Index Acknowledgements Credits

61 citations

Book Chapter
01 Jan 2008

32 citations


Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, a content analysis of the corporate sustainability reports, other documents and web sites of 14 apparel brands belonging to the Sustainable Apparel Coalition (SAC) was conducted to identify indicators related to sustainability.
Abstract: Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to identify the reported indicators in corporate sustainability reports, other documents and the web sites of 14 apparel brands belonging to the Sustainable Apparel Coalition (SAC). Design/methodology/approach – A content analysis of the corporate sustainability reports, other documents and web sites of the 14 SAC apparel brands was conducted to identify indicators related to sustainability. Qualitative and quantitative data were collected on all reported sustainability initiatives, actions, and indicators. A normative business model was developed for the categorization of the indicators and a cross-case analysis of the apparel brand’s sustainability reporting was conducted. Findings – In total, 87 reported corporate sustainability indicators were identified. The study finds that there is a lack of consistency among them. The majority of the indicators dealt with performance in supply-chain sustainability while the least frequently reported indicators addressed busin...

134 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors illustrate how marketers can encourage contemporary consumers to become strongly oriented toward sustainable fashion product consumption (SFPC) by developing and staging memorable consumer-centered experiences that orient consumers toward SFPC encourages the consumers achieving desired balance states.

127 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors examine the concept of fashion remanufacturing, the requirements for a reverse supply chain and the barriers and opportunities that exist for future growth of this sustainable business.
Abstract: Fast changing fashion trends have led to high consumption rates of clothing, shortening of life-spans for many fashion products and increasing amounts of textile waste. Addressing the problems caused by the unsustainable landscape of the fashion industry requires alternative solutions, new business models or whole systems rethink. Fashion remanufacturing is one such strategy that supports material recirculation and thus reduces land filling of fashion waste. This paper examines the concept of fashion remanufacturing, the requirements for a reverse supply chain and the barriers and opportunities that exist for future growth of this sustainable business. The investigation reveals that although collaboration among key players along the reverse supply chain is essential for business growth, the extent of this growth is dependent on the commitment and involvement of large fashion retailers and the fashion consumer. We conclude the paper by considering the implications for the fashion industry if fashion remanufacture were to become a more mainstream business model.

99 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The fashion industry is one of the most wasteful consumer industries in the world as mentioned in this paper, and clothing has evolved from a durable good to a daily purchase in recent years, a framework for a more efficient, closed-loop economy has emerged as a key way forward in the transition to a more sustainable and less wasteful fashion industry.

95 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The European Clothing Action Plan (ECAP) as mentioned in this paper is an EU initiative to improve the environmental impact of fashion and is based on the concept of sustainable fashion. But it is widely considered the second most destructive industry after oil, to the environment.
Abstract: Fashion is widely considered the second most destructive industry after oil, to the environment. An EU initiative called the European Clothing Action Plan has been launched to significantly improve...

84 citations