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Tobias Stauber

Bio: Tobias Stauber is an academic researcher from Spanish National Research Council. The author has contributed to research in topic(s): Graphene & Bilayer graphene. The author has an hindex of 39, co-authored 126 publication(s) receiving 13172 citation(s). Previous affiliations of Tobias Stauber include University of Manchester & University of Regensburg.
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Journal ArticleDOI
06 Jun 2008-Science
TL;DR: It is shown that the opacity of suspended graphene is defined solely by the fine structure constant, a = e2/hc � 1/137 (where c is the speed of light), the parameter that describes coupling between light and relativistic electrons and that is traditionally associated with quantum electrodynamics rather than materials science.
Abstract: There are few phenomena in condensed matter physics that are defined only by the fundamental constants and do not depend on material parameters. Examples are the resistivity quantum, h/e2 (h is Planck's constant and e the electron charge), that appears in a variety of transport experiments and the magnetic flux quantum, h/e, playing an important role in the physics of superconductivity. By and large, sophisticated facilities and special measurement conditions are required to observe any of these phenomena. We show that the opacity of suspended graphene is defined solely by the fine structure constant, a = e2/hc feminine 1/137 (where c is the speed of light), the parameter that describes coupling between light and relativistic electrons and that is traditionally associated with quantum electrodynamics rather than materials science. Despite being only one atom thick, graphene is found to absorb a significant (pa = 2.3%) fraction of incident white light, a consequence of graphene's unique electronic structure.

7,102 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
Bernhard Wunsch1, Bernhard Wunsch2, Tobias Stauber2, Fernando Sols1  +1 moreInstitutions (2)
Abstract: The polarization of graphene is calculated exactly within the random phase approximation for arbitrary frequency, wavevector and doping. At finite doping, the static susceptibility saturates to a constant value for low momenta. At q = 2kF it has a discontinuity only in the second derivative. In the presence of a charged impurity this results in Friedel oscillations which decay with the same power law as the Thomas–Fermi contribution, the latter being always dominant. The spin density oscillations in the presence of a magnetic impurity are also calculated. The dynamical polarization for low q and arbitrary ω is employed to calculate the dispersion relation and the decay rate of plasmons and acoustic phonons as a function of doping. The low screening of graphene, combined with the absence of a gap, leads to a significant stiffening of the longitudinal acoustic lattice vibrations.

886 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
Abstract: We compute the optical conductivity of graphene beyond the usual Dirac-cone approximation, giving results that are valid in the visible region of the conductivity spectrum. The effect of next-nearest-neighbor hopping is also discussed. Using the full expression for the optical conductivity, the transmission and reflection coefficients are given. We find that even in the optical regime the corrections to the Dirac-cone approximation are surprisingly small a few percent. Our results help in the interpretation of the experimental results reported by Nair et al. Science 320, 1308 2008.

679 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
Abstract: Using the semiclassical Boltzmann theory, we calculate the conductivity as a function of the carrier density. We include the scattering from charged impurities but conclude that the estimated impurity density is too low in order to explain the experimentally observed mobilities. We thus propose an additional scattering mechanism involving midgap states, which leads to a similar $k$ dependence of the relaxation time as charged impurities. The proposed scattering mechanism can account for the experimental findings such as the sublinear behavior of the conductivity versus gate voltage and the increase of the minimal conductivity for clean samples. We also discuss temperature dependent scattering due to acoustic phonons.

443 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
Abstract: We study the changes in the electronic structure induced by lattice defects in graphene planes. In many cases, lattice distortions give rise to localized states at the Fermi level. Electron-electron interactions lead to the existence of local moments. The RKKY interaction between these moments is always ferromagnetic, due to the semimetallic properties of graphene.

256 citations


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Journal ArticleDOI
Abstract: This article reviews the basic theoretical aspects of graphene, a one-atom-thick allotrope of carbon, with unusual two-dimensional Dirac-like electronic excitations. The Dirac electrons can be controlled by application of external electric and magnetic fields, or by altering sample geometry and/or topology. The Dirac electrons behave in unusual ways in tunneling, confinement, and the integer quantum Hall effect. The electronic properties of graphene stacks are discussed and vary with stacking order and number of layers. Edge (surface) states in graphene depend on the edge termination (zigzag or armchair) and affect the physical properties of nanoribbons. Different types of disorder modify the Dirac equation leading to unusual spectroscopic and transport properties. The effects of electron-electron and electron-phonon interactions in single layer and multilayer graphene are also presented.

18,972 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This work reviews the historical development of Transition metal dichalcogenides, methods for preparing atomically thin layers, their electronic and optical properties, and prospects for future advances in electronics and optoelectronics.
Abstract: Single-layer metal dichalcogenides are two-dimensional semiconductors that present strong potential for electronic and sensing applications complementary to that of graphene.

11,301 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The extremely high value of the thermal conductivity suggests that graphene can outperform carbon nanotubes in heat conduction and establishes graphene as an excellent material for thermal management.
Abstract: We report the measurement of the thermal conductivity of a suspended single-layer graphene. The room temperature values of the thermal conductivity in the range ∼(4.84 ± 0.44) × 103 to (5.30 ± 0.48) × 103 W/mK were extracted for a single-layer graphene from the dependence of the Raman G peak frequency on the excitation laser power and independently measured G peak temperature coefficient. The extremely high value of the thermal conductivity suggests that graphene can outperform carbon nanotubes in heat conduction. The superb thermal conduction property of graphene is beneficial for the proposed electronic applications and establishes graphene as an excellent material for thermal management.

10,520 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
Xuesong Li1, Weiwei Cai1, Jinho An1, Seyoung Kim1  +9 moreInstitutions (2)
05 Jun 2009-Science
TL;DR: It is shown that graphene grows in a self-limiting way on copper films as large-area sheets (one square centimeter) from methane through a chemical vapor deposition process, and graphene film transfer processes to arbitrary substrates showed electron mobilities as high as 4050 square centimeters per volt per second at room temperature.
Abstract: Graphene has been attracting great interest because of its distinctive band structure and physical properties. Today, graphene is limited to small sizes because it is produced mostly by exfoliating graphite. We grew large-area graphene films of the order of centimeters on copper substrates by chemical vapor deposition using methane. The films are predominantly single-layer graphene, with a small percentage (less than 5%) of the area having few layers, and are continuous across copper surface steps and grain boundaries. The low solubility of carbon in copper appears to help make this growth process self-limiting. We also developed graphene film transfer processes to arbitrary substrates, and dual-gated field-effect transistors fabricated on silicon/silicon dioxide substrates showed electron mobilities as high as 4050 square centimeters per volt per second at room temperature.

9,917 citations


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Performance
Metrics

Author's H-index: 39

No. of papers from the Author in previous years
YearPapers
20213
202015
20199
20185
20174
20165