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Tuija Parvikko

Bio: Tuija Parvikko is an academic researcher from University of Jyväskylä. The author has contributed to research in topics: Pariah group & Refugee. The author has an hindex of 4, co-authored 12 publications receiving 47 citations.

Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
01 Jan 2004
TL;DR: The authors argued that Arendt adopted Weber's idealtypical method and used it as one of her most important analytical tools especially in her writings on Jewish pariahdom and analysis of totalitarianism.
Abstract: Among Hannah Arendt scholars, Max Weber’s impact on her thinking and writing remains unrecognized even today. Arendt’s and Weber’s thought has been compared surprisingly little. This negligence casts an unhappy shadow over the understanding of Arendt’s ‘methodology’. This article argues that Arendt adopted Weber’s idealtypical method and used it as one of her most important analytical tools especially in her writings on Jewish pariahdom and analysis of totalitarianism. It is not generally understood that Arendt’s approach to the formation of Nazi totalitarianism is profoundly ideal-typical. The article also claims that Arendt drew from Weber’s ideas on responsibility and judgement even though they were not exclusively identical. Their understanding of these concepts has to be related to their conceptions of politics: Weber emphasized the conflictual character of politics, while Arendt focused on its creative dimension as a potential new beginning.

8 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This paper argued that it is not possible to construct firm patterns of thinking that would prevent us from evildoing under any circumstances for the simple reason that they conceived of thinking as an activity that cannot be taught because it does not follow preexisting rules or patterns.
Abstract: Hannah Arendt's controversial pamphlet, Eichmann in Jerusalem, (1) has often been read as her contribution to the theory of judgment. More precisely, it has been read as a first step toward themes she later approached in The Life of the Mind, a three-volume treatise of mental human faculties, the first two parts of which appeared posthumously in 1978 because she did not have time to finish the trilogy herself. This seems to be a plausible explanation in the light of how Arendt explained her attempt to theorize thinking, willing, and judging in the Introduction of the first part: Factually, my preoccupation with mental activities has two rather different origins. The immediate impulse came from my attending the Eichmann trial in Jerusalem. In my report of it I spoke of "the banality of evil." Behind that phrase, I held no thesis or doctrine, although I was dimly aware of the fact that it went counter to our tradition of thought--literary, theological, or philosophic--about the phenomenon of evil. Evil, we have learned, is something demonic.... However, what I was confronted with was utterly different and still undeniably factual. I was struck by a manifest shallowness in the doer that made it impossible to trace the uncontestable evil of his deeds to any deeper level of roots or motives. The deeds were monstrous, but the doer--at least the very effective one now on trial--was quite ordinary, commonplace, and neither demonic nor monstrous. There was no sign in him of firm ideological convictions or of specific evil motives, and the only notable characteristic one could detect in his pa st behavior as well as in his behavior during the trial and throughout the pre-trial police examination was something entirely negative; it was not stupidity but thoughtlessness. (2) This quotation invites us to think that, with hindsight, Arendt located the principal issue of her trial report in the character of evil and its relation to judgment. It invites us to consider that what Arendt had in mind was a new theory of judgment derived from the new character of evil she managed to identify and capture in Jerusalem. She seemed to connect the lack of judgment to the absence of thinking. Arendt asked whether the activity of thinking as such could be among the conditions that make men abstain from evildoing, or even actually condition them against it. However, I will argue that she could not imagine that it could be possible to construct firm patterns of thinking that would prevent us from evildoing under any circumstances for the simple reason that she conceived of thinking as an activity that cannot be taught because it does not follow preexisting rules or patterns. Thus, what Arendt had in mind was not a handbook of patterns of thought to which we could refer whenever necessary. On the other hand, it is clear that she aimed at a systematic examination of thinking as a mental activity, and she saw in it more than just a disinterested mental process. She aimed at connecting it with two other mental activities that philosophy had failed to study systematically and convincingly--namely willing and judging. In other words, the thinking to which Arendt referred was not a disinterested, disconnect ed, unworldly, and introverted individual activity but rather an activity firmly connected with judgment, that is, firmly connected with the human world. However, we cannot know how theoretical a treatise she would have written if she had had time to write it. All we know is that she would have utilized Kantian notions on one hand, and she would have argued against the possibility of theoretically tame thinking and judging because of their practical character on the other hand. (3) Rereading Eichmann in Jerusalem It has become commonplace to read Eiehmann in Jerusalem as a first step toward a general theoretical treatise of political judgment. In other words, most scholars approach it as a first step to The Life of the Mind and end up criticizing Arendt for making overly harsh generalizations of Jewish policy during the Third Reich. …

7 citations


Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors examine the process of renaming East Berlin's communist past in the years 1990-1994 and the subsequent reshaping of the city's postcommunist political geography as an aspect of the reunification of Germany, and of Berlin in particular.

172 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The notion of the performative speech act, first espoused by philosopher J. L. Austin, has influenced a range of geographical scholarship, largely through an engagement with the writings of feminist theorist Judith Butler as mentioned in this paper.

81 citations

DissertationDOI
25 Sep 2017
TL;DR: A traves del analisis de un tipo particular de criminalidad (el crimen de Estado) and del desarrollo de un estudio de caso, esta investigacion ofrece diferent reflexiones sobre como es entendida la impunidad in los discursos sociales contemporaneos and en la literatura especializada, principalmente desde los derechos humanos, el derecho and la sociologia as mentioned in this paper.
Abstract: La presente investigacion problematiza, caracteriza y conceptualiza el fenomeno de la impunidad desde una perspectiva socio-juridica. A traves del analisis de un tipo particular de criminalidad (el crimen de Estado) y del desarrollo de un estudio de caso, esta investigacion ofrece diferentes reflexiones sobre como es entendida la impunidad en los discursos sociales contemporaneos y en la literatura especializada, principalmente desde los derechos humanos, el derecho y la sociologia. Una vez establecido esto, el trabajo busca ofrecer una problematizacion de dichos entendimientos seguida por una reconstruccion sociologica del fenomeno. Evaluando un caso de desaparicion forzada presentado en Colombia a traves de una combinacion de metodos cualitativos, la conceptualizacion que ofrece este trabajo se centra en los relatos de las victimas y los operadores juridicos y busca ofrecer un entendimiento de la lucha contra la impunidad lo suficientemente claro, distintivo y apto para evitar la reproduccion de una racionalidad penal represiva, asi como para buscar la restauracion de los vinculos sociales alterados por el fenomeno del crimen y la preservacion de los derechos de las victimas.

52 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
Tovi Fenster1
TL;DR: The authors examines the conflicts over planning procedures, which engage such contradictory memories, and belonging at the national and local scales of planning, and explores how the dynamics of power relations can operate differently at each level and can result in planning resolutions, which link in different ways to the constructions of memory and belonging of Jews and Palestinians.
Abstract: This paper focuses on contradictory expressions of memory and belonging of Jews and Palestinians in Israel. It examines the conflicts over planning procedures, which engage such contradictory memories, and belonging at the national and local scales of planning. It explores how the dynamics of power relations can operate differently at each level and can result in planning resolutions, which link in different ways to the constructions of memory and belonging of Jews and Palestinians. The paper begins with an overview of the expressions of belonging and commemoration at the national scale of planning; in the agenda of the Council for the Restoration and Preservation of Historic Sites (CRPHS) in Israel and the rhetoric of the government National Master Plan of Israel (TAMA/35). It challenges this rhetoric in two local planning events: ‘the road and the graveyard’ and the ‘new Jewish neighbourhood and the old Palestinian village’.

39 citations