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Tula Giannini

Bio: Tula Giannini is an academic researcher from Pratt Institute. The author has contributed to research in topics: Digital art & Exhibition. The author has an hindex of 7, co-authored 28 publications receiving 139 citations.

Papers
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Proceedings ArticleDOI
08 Jul 2014
TL;DR: Examples of the phenomenon of the "digital bubble" are explored, within the context of the arts in particular and culture in general, and the assortment of terms used in a variety of ways by researchers in different fields with regard to the authors' ever more digital society are considered.
Abstract: Today's society is increasingly digitalised, with mobile smartphones being routinely carried and used by a significant percentage of the population. This provides an augmented experience for the individual that does not depend on their geographical separation with respect to their community of friends and other contacts. This changes the nature of relationships between people. Individuals may live in a "digital bubble", close to others physically, but far away from them in their digital world. More specifically, digital images can be generated and shared with ever greater ease. Sometimes the digital image takes on an important part of the individual's experience of reality. This paper explores examples of the phenomenon, within the context of the arts in particular and culture in general. We also consider the assortment of terms used in a variety of ways by researchers in different fields with regard to our ever more digital society, such as digitalism, digitality, digitalisation, digital culture, digital philosophy, etc. We survey these terms, exploring them from alternative viewpoints, including sociological and philosophical aspects, and attempt to pinpoint some of these terms more precisely, especially in a cultural and artistic context.

24 citations

Proceedings ArticleDOI
12 Jul 2016
TL;DR: This study presents specific examples of how artists and GLAM institutions are adapting to new digital ways of curating collections and conveying meaning, and shows how notions of what constitutes artistic expression are evolving as art traverses digital media boundaries, especially in terms of visual and textual media.
Abstract: The space between digital life and real life continues to fade and nowhere is this more apparent than in arts and cultural contexts. Facilitated by digital capture and curation, social media, the network, Internet, and the web, these forces combine to empower artists to be digital curators of their own work, giving voice and narration to their artistic expression. In the paper entitled Digitalism: the New Realism, the authors focus on how digital tools and technology have changed ways of doing, knowing, and being, while here we look at how today's digital landscape is changing ways of artistic expression, narration, communication, and human interaction. The growing use of digital tools and technology in the arts and culture is dramatically transforming traditional curatorial practice and by extension archival practice, so that we are moving from a gatekeeping model to an open model steeped in digital relationships across global networks and the Internet. As we immerse ourselves in the digital world, where anyone with a smartphone can be a digital curator and marshal a range of Internet services, such as Instagram, Pinterest, Twitter, Facebook, YouTube, and more specifically for example Behance (for online portfolios), artists are enabled to freely engage and interact with their audience using to their advantage crowdsourcing, "likes", chat, blogs, games and email. Emerging artists are particularly expert digitally and are able to curate their life and work directly, living naturally between physical and digital states. To demonstrate this, our study presents specific examples of how artists and GLAM (Galleries, Libraries, Archives, and Museum) institutions are adapting to new digital ways of curating collections and conveying meaning. Additionally, we show how notions of what constitutes artistic expression are evolving as art traverses digital media boundaries, especially in terms of visual and textual media. Importantly, as life in the 21st century plays out on the digital stage of the Internet, artists and GLAM institutions find themselves more than ever working at the intersection of art and information which is leading to new and innovative ways of curating contemporary art that are expressive of artistic vision and digital aesthetics, while conveying social and political meaning capable of influencing and impacting our lives.

17 citations

Proceedings ArticleDOI
01 Jul 2017
TL;DR: How digital life is increasingly becoming part of real life for more and more people around the world, especially with respect to the arts, culture, and heritage is examined.
Abstract: Claude Shannon (1916–2001) is regarded as the father of information theory. Alan Turing (1912–1954) is known as the father of computer science. In the year 1943, Shannon and Turing were both at Bell Labs in New York City, although working on different projects. They had discussions together, including about Turing’s “Universal Machine,” a type of computational brain. Turing seems quite surprised that in a sea of code and computers, Shannon envisioned the arts and culture as an integral part of the digital revolution – a digital DNA of sorts. What was dreamlike in 1943, is today a reality, as digital representation of all media, accounts for millions of “cultural things” and massive music collections. The early connections that Shannon made between the arts, information, and computing, intuit the future that we are experiencing today. This paper considers foundational aspects of the digital revolution, the current state, and the possible future. It examines how digital life is increasingly becoming part of real life for more and more people around the world, especially with respect to the arts, culture, and heritage.

16 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
12 Jan 2022-Heritage
TL;DR: In this article , the authors investigate the challenges magnified by advances in digital and computational media and culture, looking particularly at recent and relevant reports on changes in the ways museums interact with the public, focusing on human digital behavior, experience, and interaction in museums in the context of art, artists, and human engagement with art.
Abstract: Museums increasingly recognize the need to address advances in digital culture which impact the expectations and needs of their audiences. Museum collections of real objects need to be presented both on their own premises and digitally online, especially as digital and social media becomes more and more influential in people’s everyday lives. From interdisciplinary perspectives across digital culture, art, and technology, we investigate these challenges magnified by advances in digital and computational media and culture, looking particularly at recent and relevant reports on changes in the ways museums interact with the public. We focus on human digital behavior, experience, and interaction in museums in the context of art, artists, and human engagement with art, using the observational perspectives of the authors as a basis for discussion. Our research shows that the COVID-19 pandemic has accelerated many of the changes driving museum transformation, about which this paper presents a landscape view of its characteristics and challenges. Our evidence shows that museums will need to be more prepared than ever to adapt to unabated technological advances set in the midst of cultural and social revolution, now intrinsic to the digital landscape in which museums are inevitably connected and participating across the global digital ecosystem where they inevitably find themselves entrenched, underscoring the central importance of an inclusive integrative museum model between physical and digital reality.

16 citations

Proceedings ArticleDOI
07 Jul 2015
TL;DR: Although the story of Galois and his close relations can be seen as one of tragedy with lives cut short, from a historical viewpoint Evariste Galois' contribution to humankind has been a triumph.
Abstract: Evariste Galois (1811--1832) has been increasingly recognised as an important mathematician who despite his short life developed mathematical ideas that today have applications in computer science (such as Galois connections) and elsewhere. Some of Galois' mathematics can be visualised in interesting and even artistic ways, aided using software. In addition, a significant corpus of the historical documentation on Galois and his family (including his brother Alfred Galois, who was an artist), can now be accessed online as a growing number of institutional archives digitise their collections. This paper introduces some of the mathematics of Galois, ways in which it can be visualised, and also considers the issues and new opportunities with respect to visualising information on Galois and his family (including the connections between them). Although the story of Galois and his close relations can be seen as one of tragedy with lives cut short, from a historical viewpoint Evariste Galois' contribution to humankind has been a triumph.

14 citations


Cited by
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Book
01 Jan 1996

227 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors investigated the reaction of Italian state museums to the closure of their physical sites caused by the COVID-19 pandemic, taking the perspective of their online activity on social media.

117 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
01 Mar 2016
TL;DR: In this paper, a systematic analysis of studies published in journals between 1950 and 2012 was carried out to investigate how received information is applied or its effects on the recipient, that is, its outcomes.
Abstract: Several prominent scholars suggest that investigations of human information behavior or "information needs, seeking, and uses" rarely measure how received information is applied or its effects on the recipient, that is, its outcomes. This article explores this assertion via systematic analysis of studies published in journals between 1950 and 2012. Five time periods and four journals were sampled, including 1,391 journal articles, 915 of which were empirical studies. Based on these samples, the percentage of studies of information outcomes climbed from zero in the 1950s and 1960s, to 8% in recent research reports. The barriers to studying information outcomes and possible future research on this topic are explored.

40 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: From algebra to number theory and from statistics to mechanics, this versatile dictionary takes in all branches of pure and applied mathematics up to first-year university level and is also useful source book for economists, business people, engineers, technicians and scientists of all kinds who need a knowledge of mathematics in the course of their work as mentioned in this paper.
Abstract: From algebra to number theory and from statistics to mechanics, this versatile dictionary takes in all branches of pure and applied mathematics up to first-year university level. Invaluable for mathematicians, it is also a useful source book for economists, business people, engineers, technicians and scientists of all kinds who need a knowledge of mathematics in the course of their work.

39 citations

01 Jan 2001
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors explored the process of information action in the context of interest in paranormal phenomena as an instance of a leisure time venture, focusing on the needs, seeking and outcomes of information concerning the paranormal.
Abstract: This doctoral thesis explores the process of information action in the context of interest in paranormal phenomena as an instance of a leisure time venture. The topic was chosen for two reasons: on one hand, pursuing the supernatural — or any other hobby for that matter — is a domain on which research has been virtually nonexistent in information studies so far. On the other hand, the contemporary conceptualisations of information behaviour and sense-making were deemed insufficient and thus requiring further development through empirical investigation, so that they would be better suited to examining processes and free time activities. This piece of research looks at needs, seeking and outcomes of information concerning the paranormal — as well as barriers to these — in real-life situations, as experienced by people who are keen on the supernatural. The features that centrally characterise the study are its focus on the individual, situation, and process. Special attention is paid to paranormal meanings that are given to things in everyday information-related activities. This is facilitated by taking Brenda Dervin’s Sense-Making theory as a metatheory or background theory for the study. Owing to the phenomenological approach and the as-yet disputed nature of supernatural phenomena, the study does not take any stand whatsoever on their existence. The content of information action is conceived as five stages — 1) situation (consisting of Situation Movement State, motive for action, and paranormality of situation), 2) information need (topic, 10W Focus, and Time Focus), 3) information source (type, tactic of seeking, and chooser), 4) obtained information (topic, Time Focus, and method of reception), and 5) information outcome (use and effect) — as well as a factor having an adverse effect on information seeking: barrier (type and stage). The process of information action is basically envisaged as comprising of the five phases. The research data was gathered by taping the interviews of 16 people interested in paranormal phenomena. The interviews were conducted in Finland in 1995, except for one that was done in 1998. The specific method of data collection was an application of the so-called micro-moment time-line interview which is the core method of SenseMaking. This technique involves the charting of chains of events, as they happened according to the interviewees. The material thus acquired was transcribed in detail, minutely coded in a qualitative data analysis program, analysed qualitatively to find categories and patterns, as well as investigated quantitatively in order to determine distributions and relationships between variables. The most cardinal findings were as follows. One: the situation in which information action took place could itself be perceived as involving supernatural phenomena. Two: information was mostly required about normal rather than paranormal matters. Three: some people consulted information sources which they regarded as paranormal. Four: information could seemingly be obtained via supernatural modes of communication. Five: paranormal information was felt helpful. Six: barriers to seeking paranormal information were relatively uncommon, but when they did arise, they were probably related to the individual himself. Seven: two fundamental process dimensions — unit and scope — were identified. The paranormal could be perceived as manifesting itself in a number of thought forms and phenomena, and practically at any stage of the process of information action. It appears that the essence — but not process — of information action in the context of the paranormal differs from normal information action in many important respects, although they have their similarities, as well. The piece of research at hand introduces a great many novel categories, several subconcepts, and even three basic concepts. Some of the constructs specifically deal with the paranormal, but most of them are pertinent to the wider context of people’s everyday life, leisure time, interests, and hobbies. The most central theoretical implications for information seeking research in general are the following. One: the motivations behind searching for information are much more heterogeneous than presumed by the rationalistic ”school of problem-solving”. Two: the questions representing information needs are more versatile than what has been believed to date. Three: the present-day scientific endeavour in our field pays inordinate attention to documentary and especially electronic sources and systems, at the cost of personal and less technical originators and providers of information. Four: exploring the perceptual potentiality of the human being for obtaining and processing information has been forgotten in information studies. Five: it is proposed that the previously ambiguous ”information use” is relegated to the subordination of the more general ”information outcome”. This is a process whose latter ”substage” is information effect. Six: barriers do not disturb information seeking only, but can emerge in any phase of the process. Seven: it was found that the process of information action is a complex, non-linear and multilevel phenomenon. Many of the categories and concepts in the current investigation can be exploited not only in information studies, but also in SenseMaking. As a whole, the concepts and their interrelationships constitute a framework which pertains to three theoretical perspectives: information action, process, and sensemaking. The thesis advises the scholarly community to replace the mechanistic term of ”information behaviour” with that of ”information action” which underlines the intentionality of human existence. The study develops a model of process, as well, which outlines the processes of information seeking and action in unparalleled depth and width. The Sense-Making theory is not spared from revisions, either, which principally concern the concepts of gap-bridging and use. The greatest theoretical merit of this piece of research is that of contributing to our understanding of information action as a genuine process. Among other things, this conceptualization has consequences for the methodology of information seeking research.

32 citations