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Author

Ulla Tervahauta

Bio: Ulla Tervahauta is an academic researcher from University of Copenhagen. The author has contributed to research in topics: Early Christianity & Late Antiquity. The author has an hindex of 3, co-authored 7 publications receiving 107 citations.

Papers
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Book
05 Oct 2017
TL;DR: In this article, a collection of essays dealing with perceptions of wisdom, femaleness, and their interconnections in a wide range of ancient sources, including papyri, Nag Hammadi documents, heresiological accounts and monastic literature is presented.
Abstract: Women and Knowledge in Early Christianity offers a collection of essays that deal with perceptions of wisdom, femaleness, and their interconnections in a wide range of ancient sources, including papyri, Nag Hammadi documents, heresiological accounts and monastic literature.

85 citations

Book
01 Dec 2014
TL;DR: Tervahauta as discussed by the authors argues that Authentikos Logos is best approached from the context of Christian traditions of late ancient Egypt between the third and the fifth centuries, and analyzes the relationship of the Logos with the Valentinian Wisdom myth and suggests that no firm evidence connects the writing closely with Valentinian traditions.
Abstract: Authentikos Logos (NHC VI,3), also known as Authoritative Teaching, is a little studied story of a soul's descent and ascent in the Nag Hammadi library. With her book Ulla Tervahauta fills a gap in the scholarship and provides the first monograph-length study that has this writing as its primary focus. The aim is to find a place and context for Authentikos Logos within early Christianity, but Tervahauta also adds new insight into the scholarship of the Nag Hammadi Library and study of early Christianity. Contrary to the usual discussion of the Nag Hammadi writings from the viewpoint of Gnostic studies, she argues that Authentikos Logos is best approached from the context of Christian traditions of late ancient Egypt between the third and the fifth centuries. Tervahauta discusses the story of the soul's journey in light of various Christian and Platonic writings. Also, she analyses the relationship of Authentikos Logos with the Valentinian Wisdom myth and suggests that no firm evidence connects the writing closely with Valentinian traditions. And although a Platonic mind-set can be assumed, the writing combines motifs in a unique manner. For example, the four epithets used in the writing - the "invisible soul," the "pneumatic soul," the "material soul," and the "rational soul" - are not found thus combined elsewhere. Discussion of matter (hyle) is connected with Christian scriptural allusions and the focus is on ethics and the evilness of matter. The body, on the other hand, is the soul's place of contest and progress. The Pauline term "pneumatic body" (1 Cor 15:44) is used allusively and from a Platonic perspective. With this book Ulla Tervahauta makes an important contribution to the study of early Christianity in late ancient Egypt by discussing a writing that shows knowledge and creative combination of literary traditions that circulated in late ancient Egypt.

9 citations


Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, women, fire, and dangerous things: What Categories Reveal about the Mind are discussed and discussed in the context of women's empowerment and women's mental health.
Abstract: (1988). Women, Fire, and Dangerous Things: What Categories Reveal about the Mind. The Journal of Higher Education: Vol. 59, No. 6, pp. 698-699.

418 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors discuss the evolution of female ascetic life and the demise of the Homoiousian model in Asia Minor: "Virgins of God", "Parthenoi", widows, deaconesses, etc.
Abstract: Part 1 Asia Minor: \"Virgins of God\" - variations of female ascetic life Basil of Caesarea - the classic model in the background - Macrina and Naucratius Homoisousian asceticism \"Parthenoi\", widows, deaconesses - continuing variety symbiosis of male and female ascetics and the demise of the Homoiousian model. Part 2 Egypt: canons and papyri desert-mothers and wandering virgins - the \"Apophthegmata Patrum\" Pachomius and Shenoute - the other classic model \"in the desert and in the countryside, in towns or villages\" - the \"Historia Lausiaca\" and the \"Historia Monachorum\" Athanasius of Alexandria and urban asceticism.

182 citations

Book
01 Jan 2008
TL;DR: In this article, the purpose of Matthew in Light of the Incipit is discussed and the role of Deutero-Zechariah in Matthew's Olivet Discourse is discussed.
Abstract: Introduction 1. Myth Theory, Comparison, and Embedded Scripture Texts 2. Love as Societal Vision and Counter-Imperial Practice in Matthew 22.34-40 - Warren Carter 3. Matthew's Earliest Interpreter: Justin Martyr on Matthew's Fulfillment Quotations - J.R.C. Cousland 4. 'The Book of the Genesis of Jesus Christ' The Purpose of Matthew in Light of the Incipit - Craig A. Evans. 5. Mark, Elijah, the Baptist and Matthew: The Success of the First Intertextual Reading of Mark - Mark Goodacre 6. Reading Zechariah and Matthew's Olivet Discourse - Clay Alan Ham 7. From History to Myth and Back Again: The Historicizing Function of Scripture in Matthew 2 - Thomas R. Hatina 8. Plotting Jesus: Characterization, Identity, and the Voice of God in Matthew's Gospel - Michael P. Knowles 9. The King as Shepherd: the Role of Deutero-Zechariah in Matthew - John Nolland 10. Matthew's Atomistic Use of Scripture: Messianic Interpretation of Isaiah 53.4 in Matthew 8.17 - Lidija Novakovic 11. Scribal Methods in Matthew and Mishnah Abot -Lawrence M. Wills 12. Matthew's Intertexts and the Presentation of Jesus as Healer-Messiah - Andries G. van Aarde Bibliography Index of References Index of Authors.

176 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the Goddesses, Whores, Wives, Slaves, and Slaves: Women in Classical Antiquity are discussed. But they do not discuss the role of women as slaves.
Abstract: (1975). Goddesses, Whores, Wives, and Slaves: Women in Classical Antiquity. History: Reviews of New Books: Vol. 4, No. 2, pp. 36-36.

169 citations