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Uta M. Quasthoff

Other affiliations: Bielefeld University
Bio: Uta M. Quasthoff is an academic researcher from Technical University of Dortmund. The author has contributed to research in topics: Narrative & Conversation. The author has an hindex of 14, co-authored 50 publications receiving 964 citations. Previous affiliations of Uta M. Quasthoff include Bielefeld University.

Papers
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01 Jan 2009
TL;DR: This article presents a revised version of GAT, a transcription system first developed by a group of German conversation analysts and interactional linguists in 1998, which proposes some conventions which are more compatible with linguistic and phonetic analyses of spoken language.
Abstract: This article presents a revised version of GAT, a transcription system first developed by a group of German conversation analysts and interactional linguists in 1998. GAT tries to follow as many principles and conventions of CA's Jeffersonstyle transcription as possible, yet proposes some conventions which are more compatible with linguistic and phonetic analyses of spoken language, especially for the representation of prosody in talk-in-interaction. After ten years of use by many reseachers in conversation and discourse analysis, it was time to revise the first version, against the background of past experience and in light of new necessities for the transcription of corpora arising from technological advances and methodological developments over recent years. This text presents the new GAT 2 transcription system with all its conventions. It gives detailed instructions on how to transcribe spoken talk on three levels of delicacy: minimal, basic and refined transcript versions. In addition, it briefly introduces a few tools that may be helpful for the user: the online tutorial GAT-TO and the transcription editing software FOLKER.

383 citations

Book
19 Jan 1995

82 citations

Book
01 Jan 1980

59 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the most important feature of stereotypes in argumentation is their quality of being expressions of collective knowledge, such as cliches, slogans, proverbs, laws-in-use, norms, and loci.

57 citations


Cited by
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01 Jan 1964
TL;DR: In this paper, the notion of a collective unconscious was introduced as a theory of remembering in social psychology, and a study of remembering as a study in Social Psychology was carried out.
Abstract: Part I. Experimental Studies: 2. Experiment in psychology 3. Experiments on perceiving III Experiments on imaging 4-8. Experiments on remembering: (a) The method of description (b) The method of repeated reproduction (c) The method of picture writing (d) The method of serial reproduction (e) The method of serial reproduction picture material 9. Perceiving, recognizing, remembering 10. A theory of remembering 11. Images and their functions 12. Meaning Part II. Remembering as a Study in Social Psychology: 13. Social psychology 14. Social psychology and the matter of recall 15. Social psychology and the manner of recall 16. Conventionalism 17. The notion of a collective unconscious 18. The basis of social recall 19. A summary and some conclusions.

5,690 citations

04 Mar 2010
TL;DR: Recording of presentation introducing narrative analysis, outlining what it is, why it can be a useful approach, how to do it and where to find out more.
Abstract: Recording of presentation introducing narrative analysis, outlining what it is, why it can be a useful approach, how to do it and where to find out more. Presentation given at methods@manchester seminar at University of Manchester on 4 March 2010.

3,188 citations

01 Jan 2016

1,572 citations

Journal ArticleDOI

751 citations

Book
29 Oct 2009
TL;DR: This book describes the most important kinds of texts in English and introduces the methodological techniques used to analyse them, describing a wide range of texts from the perspectives of register, genre and style.
Abstract: A fully updated and expanded second edition of this flagship work, which introduces methodological techniques to carry out analyses of text varieties, and provides descriptions of the most important text varieties in English. Part I introduces an analytical framework for studying registers, genre conventions, and styles, while Part II provides more detailed corpus-based descriptions of text varieties in English, including spoken interpersonal varieties, general and professional written varieties and emerging electronic varieties. Part III introduces more advanced analytical approaches and deals with larger theoretical concerns, such as the relationship between register studies and other sub-disciplines of linguistics, and practical applications of register analysis. A new chapter on EAP and ESP has been added, with new sections on the important differences between academic writing in the humanities and sciences, and a case study on engineering reports as an ESP register and genre. Coverage of new electronic registers has been updated, and a new analysis of hybrid registers has been added.

735 citations