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V. Gargett

Bio: V. Gargett is an academic researcher. The author has an hindex of 1, co-authored 1 publications receiving 14 citations.

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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: It is concluded that vervet alarm calls function to designate different classes of external danger, and context was not a systematic determinant of response.

876 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This review places equal emphasis on production, usage, and comprehension of vocal production because these components of communication may exhibit different developmental trajectories and be affected by different neural mechanisms.

180 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
01 Jun 1978-Ostrich
TL;DR: Comparisons are made between Matopos and Tanganyika observations on Black Eagles and between observations on sibling aggression in the Lesser Spotted Eagle Aquila pomarina where the second hatched chick lives longer and does not die directly from attack.
Abstract: Gargett, V. 1978. Sibling aggression in the Black Eagle in the Matopos, Rhodesia. Ostrich 49:57-63. A two-egg clutch of the Black Eagle Aquila verreauxii was observed from the hatching of the first...

56 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Of 683 identified prey items from five sources of data, over 80% consisted of domestic livestock; about 60% of this was sheep and goats, and birds nesting within conservation areas derived more than half of their food from domestic stock.
Abstract: When offered a selection of food items, bearded vultures Gypaetus barbatus in southern Africa chose bones in preference to meat or to feeding from a fleshed carcass. Once a carcass had been stripped of soft tissue by Gyps vultures, bearded vultures disarticulated sections or individual bones (depending on the size of the dead animal) in the order: limbs, ribs, vertebrae, skull. Their overall diet was estimated as 70% bone with marrow, 25% meat and 5% skin. This diet is about 15% higher in energy than an equivalent mass of meat. Of 683 identified prey items from five sources of data, over 80% consisted of domestic livestock; about 60% of this was sheep and goats. Even birds nesting within conservation areas derived more than half of their food from domestic stock which they found by foraging over adjacent commercial and subsistence farming areas. Bearded vultures obtain all their food by scavenging, and reports of attacks on live animals and even humans are rejected.

41 citations