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V. Merotta

Bio: V. Merotta is an academic researcher. The author has an hindex of 1, co-authored 1 publications receiving 11 citations.

Papers
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01 Jan 2016
TL;DR: Migration can be defined as "a process of moving, either across an international border, or within a State" as mentioned in this paper, and it is a population movement, encompassing any kind of movement of people, whatever its length, composition and causes.
Abstract: 2. Migration can be defined as “a process of moving, either across an international border, or within a State. It is a population movement, encompassing any kind of movement of people, whatever its length, composition and causes”. 1 Migrants themselves encompass the overlapping categories of migrant workers and their families, long-term and short-term immigrants, internal migrants, international students, internally displaced people, asylum seekers, refugees, returnees, irregular migrants and victims of human trafficking.

12 citations


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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: It is argued that medical xenophobia is deeply entrenched in the South African public health system despite being a fundamental breach of the country's Constitution and Bill of Rights, international human rights obligations and the existence of professional codes of ethics governing the treatment of patients.
Abstract: Xenophobic attitudes and actions are all-pervasive in South Africa in civil society and the state. Medical xenophobia refers to the negative attitudes and practices of health professionals and employees towards migrants and refugees based purely on their identity as non-South African. This paper examines the extent to which xenophobia manifests itself within the public institutions that offer health services to citizens and non-citizens, based on primary research with Zimbabwean migrants who try to access the system. The paper argues that medical xenophobia is deeply entrenched in the South African public health system despite being a fundamental breach of the country's Constitution and Bill of Rights, international human rights obligations and the existence of professional codes of ethics governing the treatment of patients.

127 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Concern is raised that migration‐aware public health programming initiatives could be co‐opted through a global health security agenda to further restrict movement across borders.
Abstract: Introduction Global migration policy discussions are increasingly driven by moral panics - public anxiety about issues thought to threaten the moral standards of society. This includes the development of two Global Compacts - agreed principles to guide an international response - for (1) "Refugees" and (2) "Safe, Regular and Orderly Migration." While the need to address migration and health is increasingly recognized at the global level, concerns are raised about if this will be reflected in the final Compacts. The Compacts focus on securitization, an approach that aims to restrict the movement of people, presenting potentially negative health consequences for people who move. Globally, concern is raised that migration-aware public health programming initiatives could be co-opted through a global health security agenda to further restrict movement across borders. This is particularly worrying in the Southern African Development Community (SADC) - a regional economic community associated with high levels of migration and the largest population of people living with HIV globally; this case is used to explore concerns about the health implications of the Global Compacts. Discussion Current HIV responses in SADC do not adequately engage with the movement of healthcare users within and between countries. This negatively affects existing HIV interventions and has implications for the development of universal HIV testing and treatment (UTT) programmes. Drawing on literature and policy review, and ongoing participant observation in policy processes, I outline how Global Compact processes may undermine HIV prevention efforts in SADC. Conclusions The global health imperative of developing migration-aware and mobility-competent health responses must not be undermined by moral panics; the resultant international policy processes run the risk of jeopardizing effective action at the local level. Globally, migration is increasingly recognized as a central public health concern, providing strategic opportunities to strengthen public health responses for all. Without mainstreaming migration, however, health responses will struggle. This is particularly concerning in SADC where HIV programmes - including UTT initiatives - will struggle, and key health targets will not be met. Globally, contextually appropriate migration-aware responses to health are needed, including and a specific focus on HIV programming in SADC.

26 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: With 1.36 million refugees, Uganda has witnessed Africa's highest refugee crisis and is confronted with subsequent protection and assistance demands as discussed by the authors, and the Government of Uganda and its partners are t...
Abstract: With 1.36 million refugees, Uganda has witnessed Africa’s highest refugee crisis and is confronted with subsequent protection and assistance demands. The Government of Uganda and its partners are t...

19 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This contribution analyses how EU citizens’ right to free movement and equal access to social protection is officially framed and concretely enacted within the boundaries of the Italian National Healthcare System and the role of health workers as de facto citizenship-makers.
Abstract: Since multiple crises are currently affecting Europe, interest on changes in intra-EU mobility patterns, policies and EU movers’ strategies of integration has re-emerged in academic debates. What s...

18 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors describe the nature of migration and its socio-reproductive impacts in Nepal, using household survey data and 15 qualitative interviews conducted between April to August 2013.
Abstract: This study describes the nature of migration and its socio-reproductive impacts in Nepal. This study utilized the household survey data conducted between April to August 2013, and 15 qualitative in...

16 citations