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Vagesh D. Narasimhamurthy

Bio: Vagesh D. Narasimhamurthy is an academic researcher from Indian Institute of Technology Madras. The author has contributed to research in topic(s): Reynolds number & Vortex. The author has an hindex of 11, co-authored 46 publication(s) receiving 455 citation(s). Previous affiliations of Vagesh D. Narasimhamurthy include Norwegian University of Science and Technology.

Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
Abstract: The three-dimensional wake flow behind a flat plate placed normal to the free stream has been investigated by means of direct numerical simulations. The Reynolds number Re based on the homogeneous inflow velocity and the uniform width d of the plate was 750. Coherent vortices were alternately shed from the sides of the plate with a frequency corresponding to a Strouhal number 0.168. The wake was distinctly turbulent downstream of the plate whereas the mean recirculation bubble extended 1.96d downstream. A steady 2D mean flow and the accompanying Reynolds stresses were obtained by averaging in time and along the span of the plate. These Reynolds-averaged statistics exhibited the same qualitative features as corresponding data from cylinder wakes.

70 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
Abstract: The deployment of a complete carbon capture and storage chain requires a focus upon the hazards posed by the operation of pipelines transporting carbon dioxide (CO2) at high pressure in a dense-phase (supercritical or liquid state). The consequences of an intentional or accidental release from such pipelines must be considered as an integral part of the design process. There are a number of unique challenges to modelling these releases due to the unusual phase-transition behaviour of CO2. Additionally, few experimental observations of large-scale CO2 releases have been made, and the physics and thermochemistry involved are not fully understood. This work provides an overview of elements of the EC FP7 CO2PipeHaz project, whose overall aim is to address these important and pressing issues, and to develop and validate mathematical models for multiphase discharge and dispersion from CO2 pipelines. These are demonstrated here upon a full-scale pipeline release scenario, in which dense-phase CO2 is released from a full-bore 36-in. pipeline rupture into a crater, and the resulting multiphase CO2 plume disperses over complex terrain, featuring hills and valleys. This demonstration case is specifically designed to illustrate the integration of different models for the pipeline outflow, near-field and far-field dispersion.

39 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
Abstract: Vortex shedding behind a tapered circular cylinder with taper ratio 75 placed normal to the inflow has been studied. The Reynolds numbers based on the uniform inflow velocity and the diameter of the cylinder at the wide and narrow ends were 300 and 102, respectively. In the present direct numerical simulation study it was observed that even with a very long time sampling a discrete cellular shedding pattern prevails. This is in contrast to what Parnaudeau et al. [J. Turbulence 8, 13 (2007)] speculated in their tapered cylinder study, where they suggested that with a longer time sampling a diffused cellular pattern might appear. In the present investigation it was found that streamwise vorticity increases as vortex dislocation occurs, an effect also reported by Piccirillo and Van Atta [J. Fluid Mech. 246, 163 (1993)] in their experimental study. Flow visualizations revealed that both modes A and B secondary flow structures coexist along the span of the present tapered cylinder. The wavelength of mode B is ...

34 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
Abstract: The properties of asymmetric wake patterns behind a flat plate inclined at angles of attack 20°, 25°, and 30° are investigated. The Reynolds number based on the inflow velocity and the plate width is 1000. Both two-dimensional and three-dimensional calculations are performed by direct numerical simulations. Compared to the three-dimensional simulations, the two-dimensional calculations predict a significantly lower pressure on the rear surface of the plate, which consequently leads to very high drag and lift forces on the plate. The asymmetric mean wake flow, turbulence properties, and coherent patterns in the three-dimensional simulations are analysed by time- and phase-averaged techniques. Unlike the symmetric wake flow, the vortices shed from the leading and trailing edges of an inclined plate possess unequal strength with the trailing edge vortex having higher strength. It is observed that the present three-dimensional simulations predict results which compare well with the experimental data. In addit...

32 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
Abstract: Without a clear understanding of the hazards associated with the failure of CO2 pipelines, carbon capture and storage (CCS) cannot be considered as a viable proposition for tackling the effects of global warming. Given that CO2 is an asphyxiant at high concentrations, the development of reliable validated pipeline outflow and dispersion models are central to addressing this challenge. This information is pivotal to quantifying all the hazard consequences associated with the failure of CO2 transportation pipelines, which forms the basis for emergency response planning and determining minimum safe distances to populated areas. This paper presents an overview of the main findings of the recently completed CO2PipeHaz project [1] which focussed on the hazard assessment of CO2 pipelines to be employed as an integral part of CCS. Funded by the European Commission FP7 Energy programme, the project's main objective was to address this fundamentally important issue.

26 citations


Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI
Abstract: Carbon capture and storage (CCS) is broadly recognised as having the potential to play a key role in meeting climate change targets, delivering low carbon heat and power, decarbonising industry and, more recently, its ability to facilitate the net removal of CO2 from the atmosphere. However, despite this broad consensus and its technical maturity, CCS has not yet been deployed on a scale commensurate with the ambitions articulated a decade ago. Thus, in this paper we review the current state-of-the-art of CO2 capture, transport, utilisation and storage from a multi-scale perspective, moving from the global to molecular scales. In light of the COP21 commitments to limit warming to less than 2 °C, we extend the remit of this study to include the key negative emissions technologies (NETs) of bioenergy with CCS (BECCS), and direct air capture (DAC). Cognisant of the non-technical barriers to deploying CCS, we reflect on recent experience from the UK's CCS commercialisation programme and consider the commercial and political barriers to the large-scale deployment of CCS. In all areas, we focus on identifying and clearly articulating the key research challenges that could usefully be addressed in the coming decade.

1,157 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
Abstract: This review considers data and models for CO 2 transport. The thermophysical properties of CO 2 and CO 2 -rich mixtures are needed as a basis for various models within CO 2 capture and storage (CCS). In particular, this is true for transient models of pipes and vessels. Here, the data situation for phase equilibria, density, speed of sound, viscosity and thermal conductivity is reviewed, and property models are considered. Further, transient flow data and models for pipes are reviewed, including considerations regarding running-ductile fractures, which are essential to understand for safety. A depressurization case study based on recently published expansion-tube data is included as well. Non-equilibrium modelling of flow and phase equilibria are reviewed. Further, aspects related to the transport of CO 2 by ship are considered. Many things are known about CO 2 transport, e.g., that it is feasible and safe. However, if full-scale CCS were to be deployed today, conservative design and operational decisions would have to be made due to the lack of quantitative validated models.

88 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
Abstract: Many studies have tackled the problem of vortex-induced vibrations (VIV) of a vertical riser with a constant tension and placed in uniform currents. In this study, attention is focused on the cross-flow VIV modelling, time-domain analysis and prediction of variable-tension vertical risers in linearly sheared currents. The partial-differential equation governing the riser transverse motion is based on a flexural tensioned-beam model with typical pinned–pinned supports. The hydrodynamic excitation model describing the modulation of lift force is based on a distributed van der Pol wake oscillator whose nonlinear equation is also partial-differential due to the implementation of a diffusion term. The variation of empirical wake coefficients with system parameters and the water depth-dependent Reynolds number is introduced. Based on the assumed Fourier mode shape functions obtained by accounting for the effect of non-uniform tension, the Galerkin technique is utilized to construct a low-dimensional multi-mode model governing the coupled fluid-riser interaction system due to VIV. Numerical simulations in the case of varying sheared flow profiles are carried out to systematically evaluate riser nonlinear dynamics and highlight the influence of fluid–structure parameters along with associated VIV aspects. In particular, the effects of shear and tensioned-beam (tension versus bending) parameters are underlined. Some comparisons with published experimental results and observations are qualitatively and quantitatively discussed. Overall parametric analysis and prediction results may be worthwhile for being a new benchmark against future experimental testing and/or numerical results predicted by an alternative model and methodology.

71 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
Abstract: The three-dimensional wake flow behind a flat plate placed normal to the free stream has been investigated by means of direct numerical simulations. The Reynolds number Re based on the homogeneous inflow velocity and the uniform width d of the plate was 750. Coherent vortices were alternately shed from the sides of the plate with a frequency corresponding to a Strouhal number 0.168. The wake was distinctly turbulent downstream of the plate whereas the mean recirculation bubble extended 1.96d downstream. A steady 2D mean flow and the accompanying Reynolds stresses were obtained by averaging in time and along the span of the plate. These Reynolds-averaged statistics exhibited the same qualitative features as corresponding data from cylinder wakes.

70 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
Abstract: While the wake of a circular cylinder and, to a lesser extent, the normal flat plate have been studied in considerable detail, the wakes of elliptic cylinders have not received similar attention. However, the wakes from the first two bodies have considerably different characteristics, in terms of three-dimensional transition modes, and near- and far-wake structure. This paper focuses on elliptic cylinders, which span these two disparate cases. The Strouhal number and drag coefficient variations with Reynolds number are documented for the two-dimensional shedding regime. There are considerable differences from the standard circular cylinder curve. The different three-dimensional transition modes are also examined using Floquet stability analysis based on computed two-dimensional periodic base flows. As the cylinder aspect ratio (major to minor axis) is decreased, mode A is no longer unstable for aspect ratios below 0.25, as the wake deviates further from the standard Benard–von Karman state. For still smaller aspect ratios, another three-dimensional quasi-periodic mode becomes unstable, leading to a different transition scenario. Interestingly, for the 0.25 aspect ratio case, mode A restabilises above a Reynolds number of approximately 125, allowing the wake to return to a two-dimensional state, at least in the near wake. For the flat plate, three-dimensional simulations show that the shift in the Strouhal number from the two-dimensional value is gradual with Reynolds number, unlike the situation for the circular cylinder wake once mode A shedding develops. Dynamic mode decomposition is used to characterise the spatially evolving character of the wake as it undergoes transition from the primary Benard–von Karman-like near wake into a two-layered wake, through to a secondary Benard–von Karman-like wake further downstream, which in turn develops an even longer wavelength unsteadiness. It is also used to examine the differences in the two- and three-dimensional near-wake state, showing the increasing distortion of the two-dimensional rollers as the Reynolds number is increased.

62 citations