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Victor Cebotari

Bio: Victor Cebotari is an academic researcher from University of Luxembourg. The author has contributed to research in topics: Ethnic group & Child marriage. The author has an hindex of 10, co-authored 26 publications receiving 295 citations. Previous affiliations of Victor Cebotari include Maastricht Graduate School of Governance & Maastricht University.

Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The study compares children in transnational families to those living with their parents in their country of origin and shows that broader characteristics in the population rather than parental migration per se are associated with decreased levels of well-being.

100 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors conducted a large-scale analysis on child psychological well-being in the context of parental migration when children remain in an African country and found that being in a transnational family is associated with lower levels of psychological wellbeing.
Abstract: This study is one of the first large-scale analyses on child psychological well-being in the context of parental migration when children remain in an African country. As such, it contributes to the literature by investigating some of the insights gained from in-depth transnational family studies, and it also provides evidence from Africa where normative contexts around family life differ from Latin America, Southeast Asia, and East Asia where most studies have been conducted to date. A survey was conducted in 2010/2011 with 2,760 secondary school children and youths in high out-migration areas of Ghana. Using multiple regression analysis, we find that being in a transnational family is associated with lower levels of psychological well-being, yet only in families where parents are divorced or separated. Furthermore, when parents are in a relationship, specific characteristics of transnational family arrangements are associated with lower levels of child psychological well-being, while others are not. In particular, whether a parent migrates internally or internationally, who the caregiver is, and having a good relationship with the migrant parent are not associated with poorer well-being outcomes. Instead, if a father migrates, if the child changes caregivers more than once, and if the child has a bad relationship with his or her migrant father are associated with lower levels of well-being. This study adds nuance to a field of research that has emphasised negative outcomes and helps identify policy areas to improve the well-being of children in transnational families. Copyright (C) 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

31 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Results indicate that children with fathers, mothers, or both parents away and those cared for by a parent, a family, or a nonfamily member are equally or more likely to have higher levels of well-being as children in nonmigrant families.
Abstract: This study is the first to employ panel data to examine well-being outcomes—self-rated health, happiness, life satisfaction, and school enjoyment—of children in transnational families in an African context. It analyzes data collected in 2013, 2014, and 2015 from secondary schoolchildren and youth (ages 12–21) in Ghana (N = 741). Results indicate that children with fathers, mothers, or both parents away and those cared for by a parent, a family, or a nonfamily member are equally or more likely to have higher levels of well-being as children in nonmigrant families. Yet, there are certain risk factors—being a female, living in a family affected by divorce or by a change in caregiver while parents migrate—that may decrease child well-being.

26 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This article analyzed the conditions under which ethnic minorities intensify or moderate their protest behavior and found that two group-related factors have the strongest claim to being generalizable: while territorial concentration is a necessary condition for strong protest, national pride is necessary...
Abstract: This article analyzes the conditions under which ethnic minorities intensify or moderate their protest behavior. While this question has been previously asked, we find that prior studies tend to generalize explanations across a varied set of ethnic groups and assume that causal conditions can independently explain whether groups are more or less mobilized. By contrast, this study employs a technique – fuzzy-set analysis – that is geared toward matching comparable groups to specific analytical configurations of causal factors to explain the choice for strong and weak protest. The analysis draws on a sample of 29 ethnic minorities in Europe and uses three group and two contextual conditions inspired by Gurr’s ethnopolitical conflict model to understand why some ethnic minorities protest more frequently than others. We find that two group-related factors have the strongest claim to being generalizable: while territorial concentration is a necessary condition for strong protest, national pride is a necessary ...

26 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors examine how the life satisfaction of children is influenced by their experiences of migration and by their interactions with parents in two geographical contexts: ghana and china.
Abstract: This study is a pioneer effort to comparatively examine how the life satisfaction of children is influenced by their experiences of migration and by their interactions with parents in two geographical contexts: ghana and china. It also provides evidence of how these relationships differ across gender groups in the two countries. This study uses survey data collected in 2010 and 2013 from school children and youths aged 11–20 in ghana (n = 1,622) and china (n = 2,171), respectively. Results indicate that children (a) who previously migrated but returned and currently live with both parents and (b) who currently stay behind and have no previous migration experience are generally less likely to be satisfied with life. On the other hand, greater resilience in the outcome is associated with emotional support from parents. Also, there is suggestive evidence that chinese girls are more vulnerable to the effects of parental migration and of being, at one point of life, migrant themselves. This evidence is not replicated among chinese boys. In ghana, girls of migrant parents without a personal migration experience and boys in non-migrant families who returned from abroad show some degree of vulnerability when assessing their life satisfaction. These findings add nuance to a field of research that has yet to conceptualise the complexity of children's experiences with migration and the way this complexity associates with child well-being.

21 citations


Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, Imagined communities: Reflections on the origin and spread of nationalism are discussed. And the history of European ideas: Vol. 21, No. 5, pp. 721-722.

13,842 citations

Book
01 Jan 1985

1,861 citations

Posted Content
TL;DR: F fuzzy sets allow a far richer dialogue between ideas and evidence in social research than previously possible, and can be carefully tailored to fit evolving theoretical concepts, sharpening quantitative tools with in-depth knowledge gained through qualitative, case-oriented inquiry.
Abstract: In this innovative approach to the practice of social science, Charles Ragin explores the use of fuzzy sets to bridge the divide between quantitative and qualitative methods. Paradoxically, the fuzzy set is a powerful tool because it replaces an unwieldy, "fuzzy" instrument—the variable, which establishes only the positions of cases relative to each other, with a precise one—degree of membership in a well-defined set. Ragin argues that fuzzy sets allow a far richer dialogue between ideas and evidence in social research than previously possible. They let quantitative researchers abandon "homogenizing assumptions" about cases and causes, they extend diversity-oriented research strategies, and they provide a powerful connection between theory and data analysis. Most important, fuzzy sets can be carefully tailored to fit evolving theoretical concepts, sharpening quantitative tools with in-depth knowledge gained through qualitative, case-oriented inquiry. This book will revolutionize research methods not only in sociology, political science, and anthropology but in any field of inquiry dealing with complex patterns of causation.

1,828 citations