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Vincent Ferraro

Bio: Vincent Ferraro is an academic researcher from Framingham State University. The author has contributed to research in topics: American Community Survey & Immigration and crime. The author has an hindex of 2, co-authored 3 publications receiving 42 citations.

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TL;DR: This article examined the effect of immigration on crime within new destinations, defined as places where the foreign-born have increased by 150% or more since 1990 and with a minimum foreign-british population of 1000 in 2007.
Abstract: Drawing from a social disorganization perspective, this research addresses the effect of immigration on crime within new destinations—places that have experienced significant recent growth in immigration over the last two decades. Fixed effects regression analyses are run on a sample of n = 1252 places, including 194 new destinations, for the change in crime from 2000 to the 2005–2007 period. Data are drawn from the 2000 Decennial Census, 2005–2007 American Community Survey, and the Uniform Crime Reports. Places included in the sample had a minimum population of 20,000 as of the 2005-07 ACS. New destinations are defined as places where the foreign-born have increased by 150 % or more since 1990 and with a minimum foreign-born population of 1000 in 2007. Results indicate new destinations experienced greater declines in crime, relative to the rest of the sample. Moreover, new destinations with greater increases in foreign-born experienced greater declines in their rates of crime. Additional predictors of change in crime include change in socioeconomic disadvantage, the adult-child ratio, and population size. Results fail to support a disorganization view of the effect of immigration on crime in new destinations and are more in line with the emerging community resource perspective. Limitations and suggestions for future directions are discussed.

42 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors analyzed the effects of "stand-your-ground" (SYG) laws on violent crime and found that states are more likely to take measures to allow gun violence (albeit in self-defende...
Abstract: Although studies have analyzed the effects of “stand your ground” (SYG) laws on violent crime, the question of why states are more likely to take measures to allow gun violence (albeit in self-defe...

5 citations


Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, applied linear regression models are used for linear regression in the context of quality control in quality control systems, and the results show that linear regression is effective in many applications.
Abstract: (1991). Applied Linear Regression Models. Journal of Quality Technology: Vol. 23, No. 1, pp. 76-77.

1,811 citations

Posted Content
TL;DR: Ewing et al. as discussed by the authors found that the overwhelming majority of immigrants are not "criminals" by any commonly accepted definition of the term and that harsh immigration policies are not effective in fighting crime.
Abstract: The Criminalization of Immigration in the United States by Walter A. Ewing, Daniel E. Martinez, and Ruben G. Rumbaut Immigration Policy Center Special Report, American Immigration Council June 2015 (in press) Introduction In November 2013, NPR reported that U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) had been instructed by Congress since 2009 to fill 34,000 beds in detention facilities across the country with immigrant detainees every day. It was immediately apparent that this sort of inmate quota would never fly if applied to native-born prisoners. As the NPR story puts it: “Imagine your city council telling the police department how many people it had to keep in jail each night.” 1 Clearly, such a concept has nothing to do with fighting crime or protecting the public. But when it comes to the detention (and deportation) of immigrants, very different standards of justice and reason are at work. For more than a century, innumerable studies have confirmed two simple yet powerful truths about the relationship between immigration and crime: immigrants are less likely to commit serious crimes or be behind bars than the native-born, and high rates of immigration are associated with lower rates of violent crime and property crime. 2 This holds true for both legal immigrants and the unauthorized, regardless of their country of origin or level of education. In other words, the overwhelming majority of immigrants are not “criminals” by any commonly accepted definition of the term. For this reason, harsh immigration policies are not effective in fighting crime. Unfortunately, immigration policy is frequently shaped more by fear and stereotype than by empirical evidence, which is partly why immigrants are often treated like dangerous criminals by the U.S. immigration system. More precisely, immigrants have the stigma of “criminality” ascribed to them by an ever-evolving assortment of laws and immigration-enforcement mechanisms. From the Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986 (IRCA) to Operation Streamline (launched in 2005), immigrants are being defined more and more as threats. 3 Whole new classes of “felonies” have been created which apply only to immigrants, deportation has become a punishment for even minor offenses, and policies aimed at trying to end unauthorized immigration have been made more punitive rather than more rational and practical. In short, immigrants themselves are being criminalized. 4 Moreover, as the procedural and substantive law that comprises what has come to be called “crimmigration” law reimagines noncitizens as criminals and security risks, immigration law enforcement has increasingly adopted the securitized approach of criminal law enforcement. 5 As prominent immigration scholar Douglas Massey has written with regard to the plight of unauthorized immigrants in particular, “not since the days of slavery have so many residents of the United States lacked the most basic social, economic, and human rights.” 6

83 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This paper found that first-generation immigrants have significantly lower levels of criminal involvement compared to their US-born, second and third-plus generation peers, and found no evidence of systematic crime reporting bias among first-generational immigrants.
Abstract: Mounting evidence reveals that foreign-born, first generation immigrants have significantly lower levels of criminal involvement compared to their US-born, second and third-plus generation peers. This study investigates whether this finding is influenced by differential crime reporting practices by testing for systematic crime reporting bias across first, second, and third-plus generation immigrants. This study draws on data from the Pathways to Desistance Study, a longitudinal investigation of the transition from adolescence to young adulthood among a sample of serious adolescent offenders. Self-reported and official reports of arrest are compared longitudinally across ten waves of data spanning 7 years from adolescence into young adulthood for nearly 1300 adjudicated males and females. This study reveals a high degree of correspondence between self-reports of arrest and official reports of arrest when compared within groups distinguished by immigrant generation. Longitudinal patterns of divergence, disaggregated by under-reporting and over-reporting, in self- and official-reports of arrest indicated a very high degree of similarity regardless of immigrant generation. We found no evidence of systematic crime reporting bias among foreign-born, first generation immigrants compared to their US-born peers. First generation immigrants are characterized by lower levels of offending that are not attributable to a differential tendency to under-report their involvement in crime.

32 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the mediating effects of neighborhood friendship and kinship ties and collective efficacy in immigration-violence relationships were examined using data from the Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods.
Abstract: An extensive body of research indicates that community levels of crime are either unaffected by levels of immigration or that immigration is associated with lower, not higher, rates of crime. According to the “immigrant revitalization” perspective, the protective effects of immigration are largely indirect, working through neighborhood-level processes, such as social networks, social capital, and collective efficacy. However, these mediating effects have received little empirical attention in the immigration–crime literature. Using data from the Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods, the current study seeks to extend research on immigration and crime by assessing the mediating effects of neighborhood friendship and kinship ties and collective efficacy in immigration–violence relationships. Similar to previous studies, we find that the total effect of immigrant concentration on homicide and perceptions of violence is null. However, examining the indirect pathways reveals that immigration wo...

32 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors discuss the importance of immigration control in the political debate and it is an important component of the Trump administration agenda and discuss the role of women in this issue.
Abstract: Immigration control is at the center of the political debate and it is an important component of the Trump administration agenda. Restrictive immigration policies have expanded under the current ad...

23 citations