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Vincenzo Cusati

Bio: Vincenzo Cusati is an academic researcher from University of Naples Federico II. The author has contributed to research in topics: Aerodynamics & Turboprop. The author has an hindex of 5, co-authored 13 publications receiving 79 citations.

Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors proposed methods, developed through CFD analyses, to estimate fuselage aerodynamic drag, pitching, and yawing moment coefficients for regional turboprop aircraft.

30 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The take-off and landing performance analysis modules of the software library named Java toolchain of Programs for Aircraft Design (JPAD), dedicated to the aircraft preliminary design, are introduced.
Abstract: Purpose This paper aims to introduce the take-off and landing performance analysis modules of the software library named Java toolchain of Programs for Aircraft Design (JPAD), dedicated to the aircraft preliminary design An overview of JPAD is also presented Design/methodology/approach The calculation of the take-off and landing distances has been implemented using a simulation-based approach This expects to solve an appropriate set of ordinary differential equations, which describes the aircraft equations of motion during all the take-off and landing phases Tests upon two aircraft models (ATR72 and B747-100B) have been performed to compare the obtained output with the performance data retrieved from the related flight manuals Findings The tool developed has proven to be very reliable and versatile, as it performs the calculation of the required performance with almost no computational effort and with a good accuracy, providing a less than the 5 per cent difference with respect to the statistical trend and a difference from the flight manual or public brochure data around 10 per cent Originality/value The use of a simulation-based approach to have a more accurate estimation of the ground performance with respect to classic semi-empirical equations Although performing the simulation of the aircraft motion, the approach shown is very time-saving and can be easily implemented in an optimization cycle

18 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors performed viscous numerical simulations to calculate the aerodynamic interference among aircraft parts on hundreds configurations of a generic regional turboprop aircraft, providing useful results that have been collected in a new vertical tail preliminary design method, named VeDSC.
Abstract: Purpose This work aims to deal with a comprehensive review of design methods for aircraft directional stability and vertical tail sizing The focus on aircraft directional stability is due to the significant discrepancies that classical semi-empirical methods, as USAF DATCOM and ESDU, provide for some configurations because they are based on NACA wind tunnel (WT) tests about models not representative of an actual transport airplane Design/methodology/approach The authors performed viscous numerical simulations to calculate the aerodynamic interference among aircraft parts on hundreds configurations of a generic regional turboprop aircraft, providing useful results that have been collected in a new vertical tail preliminary design method, named VeDSC Findings The reviewed methods have been applied on a regional turboprop aircraft The VeDSC method shows the closest agreement with numerical results A WT test campaign involving more than 180 configurations has validated the numerical approach Practical implications The investigation has covered both the linear and the non-linear range of the aerodynamic coefficients, including the mutual aerodynamic interference between the fuselage and the vertical stabilizer Also, a preliminary investigation about rudder effectiveness, related to aircraft directional control, is presented Originality/value In the final part of the paper, critical issues in vertical tail design are reviewed, highlighting the significance of a good estimation of aircraft directional stability and control derivatives

15 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
19 Oct 2021-Sensors
Abstract: Structural health monitoring is recognized as a viable solution to increase aviation safety and decrease operating costs enabling a novel maintenance approach based on the actual condition of the airframe, mitigating operating costs induced by scheduled inspections. However, the net benefit is hardly demonstrated, and it is still unclear how the implementation of such an autonomic system can affect performance at aircraft level. To close this gap, this paper presents a systematic analysis where the impact of cost and weight of integrating permanently attached sensors—used for diagnostics- affect the main performance of the aircraft. Through a multidisciplinary aircraft analysis framework, the increment of aircraft operating empty weight is compared with the possible benefits in terms of direct operating costs to identify a breakeven point. Furthermore, the analysis allows to establish a design guideline for structural health monitoring systems returning a safer aircraft without any economic penalties. The results show that the operating costs are lower than those of the reference aircraft up to 4% increase in maximum take-off weight. Paper findings suggest to considering a condition monitoring strategy from the conceptual design stage, since it could maximize the impact of such innovative technology. However, it involves in a design of a brand-new aircraft instead of a modification of an existing one.

12 citations


Cited by
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01 Jan 1985

384 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: From the results of RANS simulations on a modular model of a representative regional turboprop airplane layout, the authors have developed a modern method to evaluate the vertical tail and fuselage contributions to aircraft directional stability.

37 citations

Proceedings ArticleDOI
05 Jun 2017
TL;DR: In this article, the authors present methodological investigations performed in research activities in the field of MDO in overall aircraft design in the ongoing EU funded research project AGILE, which targets significant reductions in aircraft development costs and time to market, leading to cheaper and greener aircraft solutions.
Abstract: This paper presents methodological investigations performed in research activities in the field of MDO in overall aircraft design in the ongoing EU funded research project AGILE. AGILE is developing the next generation of aircraft Multidisciplinary Design and Optimization processes, which targets significant reductions in aircraft development costs and time to market, leading to cheaper and greener aircraft solutions. The paper introduces the AGILE project structure and describes the achievements of the 1st year (Design Campaign 1) leading to a reference distributed MDO system. A focus is then made on the different novel optimization techniques studied during the 2nd year, all willing to ease the optimization of complex workflows, characterized by high degree of discipline interdependencies, high number of design variables in the context of ∗Research Engineer, Information Processing and Systems Department, AIAA Member. †Post Doctoral Researcher, System Design and Performance evaluation Department ‡Research Engineer, Research and Innovation §Assistant Professor, Department of Industrial Engineering (DII), AIAA member ¶Professor, Department of Industrial Engineering (DII), AIAA member ‖Research engineer, Integrated Aircraft Design Department, AIAA member ∗∗Researcher, Propulsion Systems Aerodynamics Department

32 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A high-fidelity geometry definition methodology enabling Multidisciplinary Design, Analysis and Optimization of aircraft configurations, and a use case example of the geometric modeling API, where an automated aerodynamic analysis workflow is used to construct a prediction model for canard-wing configurations.

25 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
Zongxia Jiao1, Dong Sun1, Yaoxing Shang1, Xiaochao Liu1, Shuai Wu1 
TL;DR: This paper proposes an anti-skid brake control algorithm to identify the maximum friction force by analyzing the runway/tire friction characteristics that can only based on the aircraft wheel speed signal and reveals that this method can accurately identify the runway circumstances and greatly improve the braking efficiency.

22 citations