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Vitor B. P. Leite

Bio: Vitor B. P. Leite is an academic researcher from Sao Paulo State University. The author has contributed to research in topics: Energy landscape & Protein folding. The author has an hindex of 19, co-authored 72 publications receiving 981 citations. Previous affiliations of Vitor B. P. Leite include University of California, San Diego & University of São Paulo.


Papers
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TL;DR: The diffusion coefficient of protein folding in a lattice model is found to be decreasing with respect to the progression of folding toward the native state, which is caused by the collapse to a compact state constraining the configurational space for exploration.
Abstract: We show that diffusion can play an important role in protein-folding kinetics. We explicitly calculate the diffusion coefficient of protein folding in a lattice model. We found that diffusion typically is configuration- or reaction coordinate-dependent. The diffusion coefficient is found to be decreasing with respect to the progression of folding toward the native state, which is caused by the collapse to a compact state constraining the configurational space for exploration. The configuration- or position-dependent diffusion coefficient has a significant contribution to the kinetics in addition to the thermodynamic free-energy barrier. It effectively changes (increases in this case) the kinetic barrier height as well as the position of the corresponding transition state and therefore modifies the folding kinetic rates as well as the kinetic routes. The resulting folding time, by considering both kinetic diffusion and the thermodynamic folding free-energy profile, thus is slower than the estimation from the thermodynamic free-energy barrier with constant diffusion but is consistent with the results from kinetic simulations. The configuration- or coordinate-dependent diffusion is especially important with respect to fast folding, when there is a small or no free-energy barrier and kinetics is controlled by diffusion. Including the configurational dependence will challenge the transition state theory of protein folding. The classical transition state theory will have to be modified to be consistent. The more detailed folding mechanistic studies involving phi value analysis based on the classical transition state theory also will have to be modified quantitatively.

94 citations

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TL;DR: It is shown that the dimensionless ratio between the gap, roughness, and entropy of the system accurately predicts the thermodynamics, as well as the kinetics of folding, and provides the quantitative bridge between the landscape topography and experimental folding measurements.
Abstract: The energy landscape approach has played a fundamental role in advancing our understanding of protein folding. Here, we quantify protein folding energy landscapes by exploring the underlying density of states. We identify three quantities essential for characterizing landscape topography: the stabilizing energy gap between the native and nonnative ensembles δE, the energetic roughness ΔE, and the scale of landscape measured by the entropy S. We show that the dimensionless ratio between the gap, roughness, and entropy of the system Λ=δE/(ΔE√(2S)) accurately predicts the thermodynamics, as well as the kinetics of folding. Large Λ implies that the energy gap (or landscape slope towards the native state) is dominant, leading to more funneled landscapes. We investigate the role of topological and energetic roughness for proteins of different sizes and for proteins of the same size, but with different structural topologies. The landscape topography ratio Λ is shown to be monotonically correlated with the thermodynamic stability against trapping, as characterized by the ratio of folding temperature versus trapping temperature. Furthermore, Λ also monotonically correlates with the folding kinetic rates. These results provide the quantitative bridge between the landscape topography and experimental folding measurements.

55 citations

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TL;DR: In this paper, a simple geometric model, hydrogen bond data, and a unidimensional model for proton transfer in hydrogen bonds were used to explain lateral conductivity and proton mobility at the water-Langmuir film interface.
Abstract: Lateral conductivity and a high proton mobility at the water-Langmuir film interface appears when the monolayer is compressed below a critical area For a fatty acid monolayer, this critical area lies between 35 and 40 \AA{}${}^{2}$, and it was thought to correspond to the formation of a H-bonded network between the monolayer headgroups and the water molecules In this work, the mobility and lateral conductivity are successfully explained using a simple geometric model, hydrogen bond data, and a unidimensional model for proton transfer (PT) in hydrogen bonds According to the model, hydrogen bonds and PT effectively occur when the distance between oxygens is $Rl28$ \AA{} It is shown that the critical value for a fatty acid monolayer corresponds to a distance of 7 \AA{} between polar heads, which leads to $R=28$ \AA{} This represents a theoretical justification for the hypothesis of proton conduction via a hop and turn mechanism Furthermore, the strong hydrogen bonds below the critical area are responsible for the monolayer structuring, which causes the surface potential to increase sharply at this area

53 citations

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TL;DR: An approach to integrate the theory, simulations, and experiments in protein-folding kinetics is proposed by measuring the mean and high-order moments of the first-passage time and its associated distribution, consistent with the strange kinetics found in folding dynamics experiments.
Abstract: We propose an approach to integrate the theory, simulations, and experiments in protein-folding kinetics. This is realized by measuring the mean and high-order moments of the first-passage time and its associated distribution. The full kinetics is revealed in the current theoretical framework through these measurements. In the experiments, information about the statistical properties of first-passage times can be obtained from the kinetic folding trajectories of single molecule experiments (for example, fluorescence). Theoretical/simulation and experimental approaches can be directly related. We study in particular the temperature-varying kinetics to probe the underlying structure of the folding energy landscape. At high temperatures, exponential kinetics is observed; there are multiple parallel kinetic paths leading to the native state. At intermediate temperatures, nonexponential kinetics appears, revealing the nature of the distribution of local traps on the landscape and, as a result, discrete kinetic paths emerge. At very low temperatures, exponential kinetics is again observed; the dynamics on the underlying landscape is dominated by a single barrier. The ratio between first-passage-time moments is proposed to be a good variable to quantitatively probe these kinetic changes. The temperature-dependent kinetics is consistent with the strange kinetics found in folding dynamics experiments. The potential applications of the current results to single-molecule protein folding are discussed.

47 citations

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TL;DR: This work investigates how different scenarios for folding can arise depending on whether the folding and collapse transitions are concurrent or whether a nonspecific collapse precedes folding.
Abstract: Experiments with fast folding proteins are beginning to address the relationship between collapse and folding. We investigate how different scenarios for folding can arise depending on whether the folding and collapse transitions are concurrent or whether a nonspecific collapse precedes folding. Many earlier studies have focused on the limit in which collapse is fast compared to the folding time; in this work we focus on the opposite limit where, at the folding temperature, collapse and folding occur simultaneously. Real proteins exist in both of these limits. The folding mechanism varies substantially in these two regimes. In the regime of concurrent folding and collapse, nonspecific collapse now occurs at a temperature below the folding temperature (but slightly above the glass transition temperature).

42 citations


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28,684 citations

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01 May 1993
TL;DR: Comparing the results to the fastest reported vectorized Cray Y-MP and C90 algorithm shows that the current generation of parallel machines is competitive with conventional vector supercomputers even for small problems.
Abstract: Three parallel algorithms for classical molecular dynamics are presented. The first assigns each processor a fixed subset of atoms; the second assigns each a fixed subset of inter-atomic forces to compute; the third assigns each a fixed spatial region. The algorithms are suitable for molecular dynamics models which can be difficult to parallelize efficiently—those with short-range forces where the neighbors of each atom change rapidly. They can be implemented on any distributed-memory parallel machine which allows for message-passing of data between independently executing processors. The algorithms are tested on a standard Lennard-Jones benchmark problem for system sizes ranging from 500 to 100,000,000 atoms on several parallel supercomputers--the nCUBE 2, Intel iPSC/860 and Paragon, and Cray T3D. Comparing the results to the fastest reported vectorized Cray Y-MP and C90 algorithm shows that the current generation of parallel machines is competitive with conventional vector supercomputers even for small problems. For large problems, the spatial algorithm achieves parallel efficiencies of 90% and a 1840-node Intel Paragon performs up to 165 faster than a single Cray C9O processor. Trade-offs between the three algorithms and guidelines for adapting them to more complex molecular dynamics simulations are also discussed.

24,496 citations

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01 Apr 1988-Nature
TL;DR: In this paper, a sedimentological core and petrographic characterisation of samples from eleven boreholes from the Lower Carboniferous of Bowland Basin (Northwest England) is presented.
Abstract: Deposits of clastic carbonate-dominated (calciclastic) sedimentary slope systems in the rock record have been identified mostly as linearly-consistent carbonate apron deposits, even though most ancient clastic carbonate slope deposits fit the submarine fan systems better. Calciclastic submarine fans are consequently rarely described and are poorly understood. Subsequently, very little is known especially in mud-dominated calciclastic submarine fan systems. Presented in this study are a sedimentological core and petrographic characterisation of samples from eleven boreholes from the Lower Carboniferous of Bowland Basin (Northwest England) that reveals a >250 m thick calciturbidite complex deposited in a calciclastic submarine fan setting. Seven facies are recognised from core and thin section characterisation and are grouped into three carbonate turbidite sequences. They include: 1) Calciturbidites, comprising mostly of highto low-density, wavy-laminated bioclast-rich facies; 2) low-density densite mudstones which are characterised by planar laminated and unlaminated muddominated facies; and 3) Calcidebrites which are muddy or hyper-concentrated debrisflow deposits occurring as poorly-sorted, chaotic, mud-supported floatstones. These

9,394 citations

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01 Aug 2000
TL;DR: Assessment of medical technology in the context of commercialization with Bioentrepreneur course, which addresses many issues unique to biomedical products.
Abstract: BIOE 402. Medical Technology Assessment. 2 or 3 hours. Bioentrepreneur course. Assessment of medical technology in the context of commercialization. Objectives, competition, market share, funding, pricing, manufacturing, growth, and intellectual property; many issues unique to biomedical products. Course Information: 2 undergraduate hours. 3 graduate hours. Prerequisite(s): Junior standing or above and consent of the instructor.

4,833 citations

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TL;DR: In this paper, the salient aspects of self-assembly through the introduction of the recent challenges and breakthroughs in three categories: (i) types of selfassembly in bulk media; (ii) type of components for self-assembling in bulk medium; and (iii) selfassembly at interfaces.
Abstract: The controlled fabrication of nanometer-scale objects is without doubt one of the central issues in current science and technology. However, existing fabrication techniques suffer from several disadvantages including size-restrictions and a general paucity of applicable materials. Because of this, the development of alternative approaches based on supramolecular self-assembly processes is anticipated as a breakthrough methodology. This review article aims to comprehensively summarize the salient aspects of self-assembly through the introduction of the recent challenges and breakthroughs in three categories: (i) types of self-assembly in bulk media; (ii) types of components for self-assembly in bulk media; and (iii) self-assembly at interfaces.

681 citations