scispace - formally typeset
Search or ask a question
Author

W. E. Lyons

Bio: W. E. Lyons is an academic researcher from University of Kentucky. The author has contributed to research in topics: Local government & Government. The author has an hindex of 10, co-authored 13 publications receiving 895 citations.

Papers
More filters
Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors employ a comparison group design to jointly assess three theoretical accounts of the source of satisfaction with local government and find an important role for local government efficacy and attachment to the local community.
Abstract: What are the sources of citizen satisfaction with local government? Our answers to this question remain fragmentary due to limits in our tools of investigation which have not been well suited for disentangling individual- and jurisdictional-level determinants of citizens' evaluations and distinguishing these from city-specific effects. We employ a comparison group design to jointly assess three theoretical accounts of the source of satisfaction. The results point to a very understandable account of satisfaction with local government. On the individual's side of the relationship, we find an important role for local government efficacy and attachment to the local community. And on the government,s, our model points to what officials actually do for citizens: provision of some level and quality of services.

228 citations

Book
31 Aug 1992
TL;DR: The Politics of Dissatisfaction: Citizens, Services, and Urban Institutions as discussed by the authors is a classic in public administration and public policy; it makes major theoretical and empirical contributions to the literature in both fields.
Abstract: The Politics of Dissatisfaction: Citizens, Services, and Urban Institutions is destined to be a classic in public administration and public policy; it makes major theoretical and empirical contributions to the literature in both fields. It is a rigorous empirical attempt to assess the public choice view of citizenship and local government. The research upon which this book is based was founded on conversations between two of its authors, W. E. Lyons and David Lowery, during the early 1980s.

138 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This article found that respondents living in smaller local jurisdictions located in the more fragmented system were not better informed about the scope and nature of their local tax-service package; they were not more efficacious about their relationships with their local government; they are not more likely to participate in local affairs; and they did not more satisfied with local services and the performance of local governments than their counterparts living in the consolidated setting.
Abstract: This article concernsfive of the key individual level propositions found in the public-choice model as it has been applied to the governing of metropolitan areas. The findings of this study are based on surveys of respondents living in five matched pairs of spatially defined areas or communities located in two metropolitan areas, one of which is characterized by high levels of governmental fragmentation while the other operates under a consolidated form of government. Contrary to expectations based on the public-choice model, citizens living in smaller local jurisdictions located in the more fragmented system were not better informed about the scope and nature of their local tax-service package; they were not more efficacious about their relationships with their local government; they were not more likely to participate in local affairs; and they were not more satisfied with their local services and the performance of their local governments than their counterparts living in the consolidated setting. Nor did the evidence support the public-choice contention that satisfaction with local services is more widely dispersed across

125 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors examined survey data on individual political behavior under two polar cases of institutional arrangement within metropolitan areas, comparing the responses of five Louisville-area cities with those of their matched Lexington neighborhoods, directly assessing the impacts of jurisdictional arrangements on a number of attitudes and behaviors that underlie the Tiebout model.
Abstract: Despite the considerable research attention accorded the Tiebout model, its empirical foundations are not especially well developed. That is, existing empirical investigations of the Tiebout model only indirectly address many of its central assumptions, given their nearly exclusive focus on aggregate-level analyses when the model evaluates institutional arrangements on the basis of a number of assumptions about individual attitudes and behaviors. This paper takes one step toward improving this situation by examining survey data on individual political behavior under two polar cases of institutional arrangement within metropolitan areas. By comparing the responses of five Louisville-area cities with those of their matched Lexington neighborhoods, we directly assess the impacts of jurisdictional arrangements on a number of attitudes and behaviors that underlie the Tiebout model.

112 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors evaluate the Exit, Voice, Loyalty, and Neglect (EVLN) model of citizen responses to dissatisfaction developed by Lyons and Lowery (1986) with data gathered from 10 separate surveys of citizens living in matched pairs of independent cities and neighborhoods.
Abstract: In this paper, we evaluate the Exit, Voice, Loyalty, and Neglect [EVLN] model of citizen responses to dissatisfaction developed by Lyons and Lowery (1986). After summarizing its key propositions, we test the model with data gathered from 10 separate surveys of citizens living in matched pairs of independent cities and neighborhoods. Considerable support is found for a respecified version of the EVLN model, support that is then used to develop an integrated understanding of citizen responses to dissatisfaction with public services in urban communities.

104 citations


Cited by
More filters
Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors draw on several literatures to distinguish two types of multi-level governance: dispersion of authority to general-purpose, nonintersecting, and durable jurisdictions, and task-specific, intersecting and flexible jurisdictions.
Abstract: The reallocation of authority upward, downward, and sideways from central states has drawn attention from a growing number of scholars in political science. Yet beyond agreement that governance has become (and should be) multi-level, there is no consensus about how it should be organized. This article draws on several literatures to distinguish two types of multi-level governance. One type conceives of dispersion of authority to general-purpose, nonintersecting, and durable jurisdictions. A second type of governance conceives of task-specific, intersecting, and flexible jurisdictions. We conclude by specifying the virtues of each type of governance.For comments and advice we are grateful to Christopher Ansell, Ian Bache, Richard Balme, Arthur Benz, Tanja Borzel, Renaud Dehousse, Burkard Eberlein, Peter Hall, Edgar Grande, Richard Haesly, Bob Jessop, Beate Kohler-Koch, David Lake, Patrick Le Gales, Christiane Lemke, David Lowery, Michael McGinnis, Andrew Moravcsik, Elinor Ostrom, Franz U. Pappi, Thomas Risse, James Rosenau, Alberta Sbragia, Philippe Schmitter, Ulf Sverdrup, Christian Tusschoff, Bernhard Wessels, the political science discussion group at the University of North Carolina, and the editor and three anonymous reviewers of APSR. We received institutional support from the Center for European Studies at the University of North Carolina, the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation, and the Wissenschaftszentrum fur Sozialforschung in Berlin. Earlier versions were presented at the European Union Studies Association meeting, the ECPR pan-European Conference in Bordeaux, and Hannover Universitat, Harvard University, Humboldt Universitat, Indiana University at Bloomington, Mannheim Universitat, Sheffield University, Sciences Po (Paris), Technische Universitat Munchen, and the Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam. The authors' names appear in alphabetical order.

1,956 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This article conducted a meta-analysis of Rusbult's investment model of commitment and found that satisfaction with, alternatives to, and investments in a relationship each correlated significantly with commitment to that relationship, and these three variables collectively accounted for nearly two-thirds of the variance in commitment.
Abstract: We conducted a meta-analysis of Rusbult’s Investment Model of commitment. Across 52 studies, including 60 independent samples and 11,582 participants, satisfaction with, alternatives to, and investments in a relationship each correlated significantly with commitment to that relationship. Moreover, these three variables collectively accounted for nearly two-thirds of the variance in commitment. Commitment, in turn, was found to be a significant predictor of relationship breakup. Support for the model was obtained in predicting commitment in both relational domains (e.g., commitment to a romantic partnership) and nonrelational domains (e.g., commitment to one’s job), but was significantly stronger in relational domains. Additional moderator analyses suggested that the associations between commitment and its theorized bases vary minimally as a function of demographic (e.g., ethnicity) or relational (e.g., duration) factors. We review theoretical strengths and shortcomings of the Investment Model and identify directions for future research. Research on social psychological dimensions

621 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors classified the mechanisms for mitigating institutional collective action dilemmas according to their scope and enforcement, and proposed an agenda to advance the theoretical and empirical development of the ICA approach.
Abstract: Institutional collective action (ICA) dilemmas arise from the division or partitioning of authority in which decisions by one government in one or more specific functional area impacts other governments and/or other functions. The focus on externalities of choice in fragmented systems integrates multiple research traditions into a conceptual system to understand and investigate collective dilemmas ubiquitous in contemporary governance arrangements. The mechanisms for mitigating ICA dilemmas are classified according to their scope and enforcement. Incentives to participate in a mechanism are hypothesized to favor mechanisms that provide the greatest gain for the least cost under different conditions of collaboration risk as determined by the nature of the underlying ICA problem, the compositions of affected jurisdictions, and institutional contexts. After reviewing empirical applications of the framework, an agenda to advance the theoretical and empirical development of the ICA approach is advanced.

458 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors present a second-generation rational choice explanation for voluntary regional governance, identifying the interests that motivate interlocal collaboration and arguing that volunta... and argue that VOLUME 7, 2019
Abstract: This article presents a “second-generation” rational choice explanation for voluntary regional governance. It identifies the interests that motivate interlocal collaboration and argues that volunta...

453 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors present formal measurement models for both conventional and revised conceptualizations of legitimacy orientations and compare the fit of the two models systematically on data from the U.S. electorate.
Abstract: Political legitimacy is a key concept in both macro and micro theories. Pioneers in survey-based research on alienation and system support envisioned addressing macro questions about legitimacy with the sophisticated empiricism of individual-level methodology but failed; and a succession of innovations in item wording and questionnaire construction only led to an excessive concern with measurement issues at the individual level. I return to an enumeration of the informational requirements for assessing legitimacy in hopes of finding a conceptualization that better utilizes available survey indicators to tap relevant macro dimensions. I specify formal measurement models for both conventional and revised conceptualizations of legitimacy orientations and compare the fit of the two models systematically on data from the U.S. electorate. The revised model appears preferable on both theoretical and empirical grounds.

444 citations