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Author

W. Luft

Bio: W. Luft is an academic researcher. The author has contributed to research in topics: Disilane & Amorphous silicon. The author has an hindex of 2, co-authored 2 publications receiving 6 citations.

Papers
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Proceedings Article
01 Jan 1987
TL;DR: In this paper, high-rate deposition of a-Si:H films was examined when silane and disilane are the feed gases, and the emphasis was on RF glow discharge, but other deposition methods were also covered.
Abstract: In high-rate deposition of a-Si:H films, the effect of deposition parameters on material properties are examined when silane and disilane are the feed gases. The emphasis is on RF glow discharge, but other deposition methods are also covered. The problems of gas-phase polymerization and power formation at high rates have been overcome by modified reactor designs. Deposition rates of 1-3 nm/s are adequate for economically fabricating the intrinsic layer. Laboratory-size a-Si:H cells with greater than 10% efficiency have been achieved with both silane and disilane at rates in the 1- to 2-nm/s range.

3 citations

Journal Article
TL;DR: In this article, high-rate deposition of a-Si:H films was examined when silane and disilane are the feed gases, and the emphasis was on RF glow discharge, but other deposition methods were also covered.
Abstract: In high-rate deposition of a-Si:H films, the effect of deposition parameters on material properties are examined when silane and disilane are the feed gases. The emphasis is on RF glow discharge, but other deposition methods are also covered. The problems of gas-phase polymerization and power formation at high rates have been overcome by modified reactor designs. Deposition rates of 1-3 nm/s are adequate for economically fabricating the intrinsic layer. Laboratory-size a-Si:H cells with greater than 10% efficiency have been achieved with both silane and disilane at rates in the 1- to 2-nm/s range.

3 citations


Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors measured the initial silane and polysilane product yields from disilane decomposition in rf and dc discharges, at 25 and 250 C and 20 Pa (0.15 Torr) pressure as typically used for a•Si:H film deposition.
Abstract: We have measured the initial silane and polysilane product yields from disilane decomposition in rf and dc discharges, at 25 and 250 °C and 20 Pa (0.15 Torr) pressure as typically used for a‐Si:H film deposition. From analyses of these yields we conclude that the initial Si2H6 fragmentation pattern is SiH3+SiH2+H (91±9%) and H3SiSiH+2H (9±9%), that the primary product of the H+Si2H6 reaction is SiH4+SiH3, and that SiH3 is the dominant radical causing film growth. We have measured a radical‐surface reaction probability of 0.34±0.03, very similar to that observed for SiH3 in SiH4 discharges. We report a spatial distribution of emission indicative of a γ‐regime discharge. From deposition on glass fibers strung between the electrodes, we find that highly strained a‐Si:H film is produced everywhere except on or near the electrodes, suggesting that energetic ion impact is necessary to yield useful films in disilane discharges.

42 citations

Book ChapterDOI
01 Jan 1995
TL;DR: A review of the features of glow discharge plasma that are of importance in understanding the fundamentals of amorphous silicon plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) process is presented in this paper.
Abstract: Publisher Summary The purpose of this chapter is to review the features of the glow discharge plasma that are of importance in understanding the fundamentals of amorphous silicon plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) process, and to survey some specific aspects of the amorphous silicon deposition that are used in clarifying the chemistry of the growth and in promoting the technological development. Hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si: H) is a highly complex material with unique properties, which have provoked widespread scientific interest and stimulated a variety of technological applications. A number of optical, electrical, and structural studies have been carried out on a-Si:H films. These investigations revealed that the material properties depend strongly on the preparation conditions. All the preparation techniques developed thus far can be collected mainly under the umbrella of the chemical vapor deposition (CVD), in which the film is produced in situ via chemical reactions. In the PECVD technique, energy is directly imparted to the chemical system by the collision of energetic electrons with the heavy particles.

14 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, thin hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) films with good optoelectronic properties were deposited from disilane at rates in excess of 20 A s −1 in a state-of-the-art glow discharge deposition system.

1 citations