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Author

W. ten Have

Bio: W. ten Have is an academic researcher from NIOD Institute for War, Holocaust and Genocide Studies. The author has contributed to research in topics: The Holocaust & Genocide. The author has an hindex of 2, co-authored 6 publications receiving 10 citations.


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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In 2011, the United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA) issued a report that summarised the fruits of experience and stimulated consideration of security strategies for aid providers.
Abstract: Attacks on health workers, clinics, hospitals, ambulances and patients during periods of armed conflict or civil disturbance pose enormous challenges to humanitarian response and constitute affronts to the imperatives of human rights and civilian protection. Violence inflicted on humanitarian aid workers is gaining the global attention it warrants. While the number of attacks on aid workers has decreased in recent years, in a handful of places, notably Sudan, Afghanistan, and Somalia, they have become more spectacular and frightening, with aid agencies targeted for kidnapping and subjected to use of explosives because of their perceived affiliation with Western governments. The assaults have galvanised the humanitarian aid community to track attacks and to engage in intensive and sophisticated discussion of means to increase operational security. After worldwide consultation, in 2011 the United Nations (UN) Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA) issued a report that summarised the fruits of experience and stimulated consideration of security strategies for aid providers. By contrast, however, until very recently the far larger number of incidents of violence inflicted on and interference with indigenous health services and on international and local development agencies by state and armed groups has received comparatively little attention.

38 citations

Dissertation
01 Jan 2017
TL;DR: In this article, the concept of humanitarianism is defined as the "conceptual definition of humanitarians" and discussed in terms of political realism, altruism, and international society.
Abstract: ........................................................................................................................................... iv LIST OF ABBREVIATIONS .................................................................................................................... vii KEY TERMS .......................................................................................................................................... ix CHAPTER 1: INTRODUCTION ................................................................................................................ 1 1.1 Background to the Study ......................................................................................................... 1 1.2 Statement of the Problem ........................................................................................................ 3 1.3 Hypothesis .............................................................................................................................. 4 1.4 Preliminary Literature Study and Reasons for Choosing the Topic .......................................... 4 1.5 Research Objectives ................................................................................................................ 9 1.6 Research Questions ................................................................................................................ 9 1.7 Principal Theories upon which the Research is Constructed ................................................. 10 1.7.1 Political Realism ............................................................................................................ 10 1.7.2 Altruism ......................................................................................................................... 11 1.7.3 International Society ....................................................................................................... 12 1.8 Methodology .......................................................................................................................... 13 1.9 Limitations of the Study ......................................................................................................... 15 1.10 Structure of the Dissertation .................................................................................................. 16 CHAPTER 2: CONCEPTUAL DEFINITION OF HUMANITARIANISM ....................................................... 18 2.

23 citations

DOI
01 Jan 2015
Abstract: of the Dissertation .............................................................................................. i Acknowledgements .......................................................................................................... iv List of Acronyms ............................................................................................................. xii Chapter One: Introduction: Rationales and Theoretical Frameworks ........................1 Rationales of the Study .....................................................................................................1 Thesis Statement and Questions .......................................................................................7 Theoretical frameworks ....................................................................................................9 Theory of Globalization ................................................................................................9 Theory of Vernacularization .......................................................................................10 Terminology ...................................................................................................................11 What is Genocide? ......................................................................................................12 Genocide Education ....................................................................................................18 Global Genocide Education ........................................................................................20 Local Genocide Education Initiatives .........................................................................22 Research Design and Methodology ................................................................................23 Qualitative Study .........................................................................................................23 Desk Research .............................................................................................................24 Archival Research .......................................................................................................24 Classroom Observations ..............................................................................................25 Risk Assessments and Risk Control ............................................................................26 Organization of the Dissertation .....................................................................................27 Chapter Two: Global Genocide Education and Vernacularization ............................30 The Developments of Holocaust Education ...................................................................30 The Slow Revival ........................................................................................................32 Holocaust Centrality ....................................................................................................37 Holocaust Universalization .........................................................................................42 Global Genocide Education Values Packages ................................................................51 Genocide Prevention: 'Never Again' ...........................................................................52 Collective Memory ......................................................................................................53 Universal Human Rights .............................................................................................55 Vernacularization: Local Adoptions of the Global Practices .........................................57 Rwanda Case ...............................................................................................................58 South Africa Case ........................................................................................................65 Conclusion ......................................................................................................................68 Chapter Three: The Politics of Teaching Cambodian Genocide in Its Aftermath ....72 Historical, Political and Social Background of the PRK Regime ..................................73 Background of Cambodian Education System ...............................................................83 Rehabilitating the Education System after the Genocide ...............................................85

18 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors analyse the place and meaning of female heroism in the process of the making of modern Italy, focusing on the emblematic case of Esperance von Schwartz, one of Garibaldi's biographers, and for...
Abstract: This article analyses the place and meaning of female heroism in the process of the making of modern Italy. Beginning with Garibaldi's first wife Anita in Brazil, a great number of women all over the world were attracted to Garibaldi and his movement. Theirs was a sentimental and political engagement, which in some cases turned them into real soldiers, like those who joined the ranks of Garibaldi's troops. Whereas until 1860 the Garibaldinian volunteer was not understood as an exclusively male category, this changed around that key year, both in reality and in the collective imagination of the Risorgimento. Women were denied the right to be soldiers in Garibaldi's legendary Thousand. Subsequently, stories of militant women like Anita Garibaldi were softened in the foundation fictions that narrate the birth of Italy, turning women into passive members of the Italian nation. This change is analysed in depth by focusing on the emblematic case of Esperance von Schwartz, one of Garibaldi's biographers, and for...

11 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors describe and analyze the production and reception of The Merchant of Venice, and in particular the representation of Shylock, in the Netherlands after World War Two, a hitherto unexplored topic.
Abstract: In this paper I describe and analyze the production and reception of The Merchant of Venice , and in particular the representation of Shylock, in the Netherlands after World War Two, a hitherto unexplored topic. The purpose of this essay is to fill this gap in research, to demonstrate the possible impact World War Two has had on Merchant , and how production and reception of Merchant in the Netherlands differed from those of surrounding countries. While countries such as France, and in particular Germany, used Merchant to confront the past and debate the horrors of Shoah, the Netherlands seemed to react differently. The discrepancy between the historical perception of the Dutch of being a tolerant nation and a haven for Jewish refugees, and the unexpectedly high percentage of Jews deported from the Netherlands—higher than in any other Western European country—had to be resolved after World War Two. In this paper I discuss how this evolving debate found its way into the Dutch Merchants .

9 citations