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Author

W Tysse

Bio: W Tysse is an academic researcher. The author has contributed to research in topics: Possession (law) & Poison control. The author has an hindex of 1, co-authored 1 publications receiving 2 citations.

Papers
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Journal Article
TL;DR: This article examined how the Codex Justinianus, one fourth of the Corpus Iuris Civilis, regulated the private individual's ability to own and engage in self defense and found that provisions in the Codex are generally very supportive of an individual's right to self defense.
Abstract: The Corpus Iuris Civilis -- a collection of ancient Roman statutes and juristic writings since the age of Cicero -- has had a profound effect on the development of modern law. This article examines how the Codex Justinianus, one fourth of the Corpus, regulated the private individual’s ability to own weapons and engage in self defense. The Article finds that provisions in the Codex are generally very supportive of an individual’s right to self defense. Though the Codex’s treatment of the private possession of weapons is mixed, the Article draws on historical context (widespread slavery, constant threat of barbarian invasion) and identifies background assumptions behind many Codex provisions to argue that private ownership of weapons must in fact have been commonplace. The Article offers new English translations of many Roman laws for which no adequate English translation currently exists.

2 citations


Cited by
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Book
14 Oct 2013
TL;DR: Bauschatz as mentioned in this paper examines the activities of a broad array of police officers in Ptolemaic Egypt (323-30 BC) and argues that police officials enjoyed great autonomy, providing assistance to even the lowest levels of society when crimes were committed.
Abstract: This book examines the activities of a broad array of police officers in Ptolemaic Egypt (323–30 BC) and argues that Ptolemaic police officials enjoyed great autonomy, providing assistance to even the lowest levels of society when crimes were committed Throughout the nearly 300 years of Ptolemaic rule, victims of crime in all areas of the Egyptian countryside called on local police officials to investigate crimes; hold trials; and arrest, question and sometimes even imprison wrongdoers Drawing on a large body of textual evidence for the cultural, social and economic interactions between state and citizen, John Bauschatz demonstrates that the police system was efficient, effective, and largely independent of central government controls No other law enforcement organization exhibiting such a degree of autonomy and flexibility appears in extant evidence from the rest of the Greco-Roman world

60 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
Dale B. Martin1
TL;DR: For example, the authors highlights the significance of Jesus' disciples being armed when he was arrested just outside the walls of Jerusalem, linking that fact with other details from the sources, such as Jesus' opposition to the temple, the presence of Samaritans among his early followers, the absence of lamb at the last supper, and the fact that he was executed by the Romans as a social rebel.
Abstract: In debating the meaning of Jesus’ arrest and death at Jerusalem, scholars have paid too little attention to normal Roman practices of dealing with persons found armed in public in Rome or other cities under their control. Moreover, the idea that only one or two of Jesus’ disciples were armed has been accepted uncritically in spite of the probability that more or all of them were armed. This article highlights the significance of Jesus’ disciples being armed when he was arrested just outside the walls of Jerusalem, linking that fact with other details from the sources, such as Jesus’ opposition to the temple, the presence of Samaritans among his early followers, the absence of lamb at the last supper, and the fact that he was executed by the Romans as a ‘social rebel’. Jesus led his followers, armed, to Jerusalem to participate in a heavenly-earthly battle to overthrow the Romans and their high-priestly client rulers of Judea.

18 citations