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Author

Wei Song

Bio: Wei Song is an academic researcher. The author has contributed to research in topics: Medicine & Psychology. The author has an hindex of 3, co-authored 7 publications receiving 15 citations.
Topics: Medicine, Psychology, Autism, Spouse, Mental health

Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This article explored the association between living arrangements in the community and community participation for autistic adults and found that autistic adults living alone with support reported the lowest levels of sufficiency with their participation, although the amount and breadth of their participation were no different from other adults.

6 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
23 Mar 2022
TL;DR: It was found that the transition-age adult group was less likely to receive services, including speech/language therapy, occupational therapy, one-on-one support, and social skill training, than adolescents, but case management and mental health services increased with age.

4 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper , the authors examined characteristics of participants in an autistic-delivered peer support program and reports on use of and satisfaction with the program and found that half of the participants had a co-occurring mental health diagnosis.
Abstract: Abstract Peer support has been an undeveloped pathway for filling the service gap and to generate employment opportunities for autistic individuals. Peer supports have been deployed widely in mental health and among veterans and understanding the utility of this service modality among autistic individuals illuminates opportunities for research, policy, and practice. This study examined characteristics of participants in an autistic-delivered peer support program and reports on use of and satisfaction with the program. Half of autistic participants had a co-occurring mental health diagnosis. Participants reported multiple areas of unmet needs and participant satisfaction with the program was high (90%). The findings of this study point toward autistic-delivered peer support as a promising avenue for future development.

3 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Older autistic adults and those employed and had higher financial resources were more likely to live alone or with a roommate or spouse than to live with family or in a supervised setting.
Abstract: BACKGROUND Living arrangements is an essential component of the social environments for autistic adults. The need to understanding the status and experience of living arrangements has been highlighted. AIM This study examined living arrangements and satisfaction with current arrangements of autistic adults reported by autistic adults or caregivers of autistic adults. METHODS This study used data from a statewide survey of autistic adults or caregivers. RESULTS Older autistic adults and those employed and had higher financial resources were more likely to live alone or with a roommate or spouse than to live with family or in a supervised setting. Correlates of greater satisfaction included being young, either men or women (vs. non-binary adults), public insurance, fewer service needs, no or one mental health diagnosis (vs. two or more), no psychiatric emergency room or hospitalisation history, and living with a roommate or spouse (vs. living with family). CONCLUSION This cross-sectional study adds to the literature on the status of living arrangements and satisfaction with living arrangements among autistic adults. Future research is needed to investigate contributing factors to the satisfaction of living arrangements and quality of life among autistic adults.

2 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This paper investigated how the amount, breadth, and sufficiency of community participation differed in terms of transportation modes used by autistic adults (N = 751) and found that autistic adults who had access to more transportation modes had a greater amount of community involvement.
Abstract: This study investigated how the amount, breadth, and sufficiency of community participation differed in terms of transportation modes used by autistic adults (N = 751). Autistic adults who had access to more transportation modes had a greater amount of community participation. Driving was related to enhanced participation. Those dependent on others or service transportation had poorer participation outcomes than those who used more independent transportation options. The associations are generally similar regardless of the richness of public transit available, although they appear stronger in more limited transit areas. These findings have several implications for providing support to enable autistic adults to participate in their communities in the areas that are important to them and to the extent they desire.

Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Older autistic adults and those employed and had higher financial resources were more likely to live alone or with a roommate or spouse than to live with family or in a supervised setting.
Abstract: BACKGROUND Living arrangements is an essential component of the social environments for autistic adults. The need to understanding the status and experience of living arrangements has been highlighted. AIM This study examined living arrangements and satisfaction with current arrangements of autistic adults reported by autistic adults or caregivers of autistic adults. METHODS This study used data from a statewide survey of autistic adults or caregivers. RESULTS Older autistic adults and those employed and had higher financial resources were more likely to live alone or with a roommate or spouse than to live with family or in a supervised setting. Correlates of greater satisfaction included being young, either men or women (vs. non-binary adults), public insurance, fewer service needs, no or one mental health diagnosis (vs. two or more), no psychiatric emergency room or hospitalisation history, and living with a roommate or spouse (vs. living with family). CONCLUSION This cross-sectional study adds to the literature on the status of living arrangements and satisfaction with living arrangements among autistic adults. Future research is needed to investigate contributing factors to the satisfaction of living arrangements and quality of life among autistic adults.

2 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
28 Feb 2023-Autism
TL;DR: In this paper , the authors applied latent profile analysis to identify subgroups of autistic youth based on parent-reported activity participation frequency at home, school and community, as well as associations with youth characteristics, family demographics and environmental supportiveness among 158 autistic youth (aged 11-14 years at baseline).
Abstract: Participation in daily activities is often linked to functional independence and well-being, yet individual variability in participation and factors associated with that variation have rarely been examined among autistic youth. We applied latent profile analysis to identify subgroups of youth based on parent-reported activity participation frequency at home, school and community, as well as associations with youth characteristics, family demographics and environmental supportiveness among 158 autistic youth (aged 11–14 years at baseline). Three-, three- and two-profile solutions were selected for home, school and community settings, respectively; the most prevalent profiles were characterized by frequent home participation (73%), low participation in non-classroom activities at school (65%) and low community participation, particularly in social gatherings (80%), indicating participation imbalance across settings. More active participation profiles were generally associated with greater environmental support, higher cognitive and adaptive functioning and less externalizing behaviour. Latent transition analysis revealed overall 75% stability in profile membership over approximately 1 year, with a different home participation profile emerging at the second time-point. Our findings highlighted the variable participation patterns among autistic youth as associated with individual, family and environmental factors, thus stressing the need for optimizing person–environment fit through tailored supports to promote autistic youth’s participation across settings. Lay abstract What people do or engage in in their daily lives, or daily life participation, is often linked to their state of being happy and healthy, as well as potential for living independently. To date, little research has been conducted on daily activity participation by autistic youth at home, at school or in the community. Learning more about individual differences in participation levels and what might influence them can help to create custom supports for autistic youth and their families. In this study, 158 caregivers of autistic youth were asked how often their children took part in 25 common activities at two assessments, about one year apart. The analysis showed three profiles for each of the home and school settings and two profiles for the community setting. These profiles reflected distinct patterns in how often autistic youth took part in various daily activities, particularly in doing homework, school club activities and community gatherings. Most autistic youth were in profiles marked by often taking part at home but less often at school and in the community, and about three-fourths of them tended to stay in the same profile over time. Autistic youth with limited participation profiles were more likely to have lower scores on measures of cognitive ability and daily life skills and more challenging behaviour, and faced more barriers in their environment. These findings show how important it is to think about each autistic person’s strengths and weaknesses, and changing needs, to better support their daily life participation.

1 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: How sensory processing patterns of autistic adults impact community participation, including where people go, what they do, the amount of time in the community, and preferred locations is explored.
Abstract: Background Sensory processing differences have been shown to impact involvement in community activities. However, relatively little is known about how these differences affect community participation in autistic adults. Objective The objective of this study was to explore how sensory processing patterns of autistic adults impact community participation, including where people go, what they do, the amount of time in the community, and preferred locations. Methods We used data gathered from six autistic adults and their caregivers who participated in two studies. From Study 1, we reviewed results of the Adolescent and Adult Sensory Profile (AASP) and transcripts from interviews with caregivers. From Study 2, we reviewed GPS tracking data and transcripts from structured interviews with autistic adults focused on community participation. We read transcript data, identified quotes related to sensory processing and community participation and constructed individual participant narratives which linked findings from interviews, AASP, and GPS tracking. Results Participants included three males and three females ranging in age from 29 to 51. Each participant had a unique sensory processing profile that influenced where they went, the activities in which they engaged, how much time they spent in the community, and their preferred locations. Those whose sensory processing patterns indicated sensory sensitivity and sensory avoiding described the experience of certain environments as overwhelming and fatiguing and thus spent less time in the community and visited fewer places than those with other sensory processing patterns. Conclusion Results highlight the importance of sensory processing, especially as it impacts participation in the community. Sensory processing patterns should be considered along with other personal and contextual factors when assessing community participation and personal sensory processing patterns should be matched with activities and environmental demands.

1 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article , a capstone review of the five-year federal Autism Transition Research Project (ATRP) cooperative agreement is presented, with a focus on equity and inclusion of autistic participants.
Abstract: Few funding sources have explicitly supported systems‐wide research to identify mechanisms for improving access, service delivery, outcomes and wellbeing for autistic transition‐age youth and young adults. We aimed to integrate findings from research produced through a five‐year federal Autism Transition Research Project (ATRP) cooperative agreement. This capstone review sought to: (1) map the body of scientific evidence that emerged from this federal award, and (2) identify remaining evidence gaps to inform future autism transition services research. We used scoping review methods to assess 31 ATRP‐funded published scientific studies. We charted study characteristics, topical domains, socio‐ecological levels of variables, focus on equity, and inclusion of autistic participants. We evaluated how these topics were addressed across studies to identify continued gaps in the evidence base. Compared to prior published reviews and research agendas, we found improvements in characterization of study participants, broader examination of socio‐ecological correlates, and examination of multiple outcome domains. However, we also identified continued deficits in inclusion of autistic study participants, use of multisectoral data, and research with a strong focus on equity. Our recommended priorities for autism transition services research to facilitate healthy life outcomes and wellbeing included: continued analysis of population‐level data and improved data infrastructure; development of service delivery methods and interventions that target marginalized groups; expanded research to inform improvements in the performance and coordination of complex service ecosystems that interface with autistic youth; and bolstering the roles of autistic research participants.

1 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper , a feasibility study was conducted to evaluate the implementation of psychological first aid (PFA) among Quebec's provincial police force, where 36 police officers participated in semi-structured interviews between October 26th, 2021 and July 23rd, 2022.
Abstract: Introduction Police officers are often exposed to traumatic events, which can induce psychological distress and increase the risk of developing post-traumatic stress injuries. To date, little is known about support and prevention of traumatic events in police organizations. Psychological first aid (PFA) has been promoted as a promising solution to prevent psychological distress following exposure to a traumatic event. However, PFA has not yet been adapted to policing reality, let alone to the frequent exposure to traumatic events faced by this population. This study aimed to evaluate the feasibility of PFA as an early intervention for the prevention of post-traumatic stress injuries among police officers in Quebec, Canada. Specifically, the objectives were to evaluate: (1) the demand. (2) the practicality, and (3) the acceptability of PFA in a police organization. Methods A feasibility study was conducted to evaluate the implementation of PFA among Quebec’s provincial police force. To do so, 36 police officers participated in semi-structured interviews between October 26th, 2021, and July 23rd, 2022. Participants were comprised of responders (n = 26), beneficiaries (n = 4) and managers (n = 6). Interviews were transcribed, coded, and evaluated according to a thematic analysis. Results Eleven themes emerged from participants’ responses. Results suggested that PFA met individual and organizational needs. References were also made regarding the impacts of this intervention. Moreover, participants provided feedback for improving the implementation and sustainability of a PFA program. All three groups of participants shared similar thematic content. Discussion Findings revealed that implementation of a PFA program in a law enforcement agency was feasible and could be accomplished without major issues. Importantly, PFA had beneficial consequences within the organization. Specifically, PFA destigmatized mental health issues and renewed a sense of hope among police personnel. These findings are in line with previous research.