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Whitney DeCamp

Bio: Whitney DeCamp is an academic researcher from Western Michigan University. The author has contributed to research in topics: Medicine & Poison control. The author has an hindex of 9, co-authored 24 publications receiving 270 citations.

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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This paper used propensity score matching to control for the shared predictors of offending and victimization and found that controlling for the propensity to be bullied reduces, but does not eliminate, the effect on later criminality.
Abstract: Although much research has explored bullies and bullying victims, little has been done to explore the long-term effects on those who have been bullied. Separately, a growing body of evidence suggests that there is a victim-offender overlap, in which many victims are or become offenders themselves. Taken together, this suggests that bullying victims may themselves be at elevated risk of involvement in deviance or crime. The present study uses data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 to explore this issue, utilizing propensity score matching to control for the shared predictors of offending and victimization. Given that bullying experiences can vary dramatically by gender, gender-specific analyses are performed. RESULTS indicate that controlling for the propensity to be bullied reduces, but does not eliminate, the effect on later criminality. Language: en

43 citations

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TL;DR: The findings suggest a relatively high importance of spirituality in terms of preventing substance use during reentry, particularly concerning the use of both alcohol and cocaine.
Abstract: Prior research has indicated an inverse relationship between religion and criminal behavior; however, few studies have specifically examined the effect of spirituality on the desistance process among a contemporary and diverse sample of reentering drug-involved offenders. A comprehensive understanding of how spirituality is related to desistance from substance use can lead to more effective and evidence-based preventive and rehabilitative interventions. Using data from a longitudinal study of 920 diverse offenders returning to the community after a period of incarceration, the current study examines three distinct forms of substance use (alcohol, marijuana, and cocaine) to gauge the effect that spirituality plays in the desistance process. The findings suggest a relatively high importance of spirituality in terms of preventing substance use during reentry, particularly concerning the use of both alcohol and cocaine.

42 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors examined the age-victim curve to explore victimization trajectories, which increases understanding of risks over time through different life pathways, and found that young adult victims often were connected to intimate partner violence, whereas childhood victim often were victimized by other students.
Abstract: Although research on the age-crime curve has made significant advances in the past few decades, the understanding of victimization has not benefited to the same degree. The present study examines the age-victim curve to explore victimization trajectories, which increases understanding of risks over time through different life pathways. Using data from the Offending, Crime and Justice Survey, a national longitudinal survey in England and Wales, trajectory modeling is used to estimate different violent victimization trajectories for people aged 10 to 29 over four years of data. Analyses indicate the presence of four distinct victimization trajectories, including: rarely victimized; young adult victims; childhood victims; and chronically victimized. Further analyses indicated that young adult victims often were connected to intimate partner violence, whereas childhood victims often were victimized by other students. Language: en

33 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A large and diverse sample of youth in eighth and eleventh grade offer further support to the conclusion that video game violence is not a meaningful predictor of youth violence and, instead, support the conclude that family and social variables are more influential factors.
Abstract: Despite decades of study, no scholarly consensus has emerged regarding whether violent video games contribute to youth violence. Some skeptics contend that small correlations between violent game play and violence-related outcomes may be due to other factors, which include a wide range of possible effects from gender, mental health, and social influences. The current study examines this issue with a large and diverse (49 % white, 21 % black, 18 % Hispanic, and 12 % other or mixed race/ethnicity; 51 % female) sample of youth in eighth (n = 5133) and eleventh grade (n = 3886). Models examining video game play and violence-related outcomes without any controls tended to return small, but statistically significant relationships between violent games and violence-related outcomes. However, once other predictors were included in the models and once propensity scores were used to control for an underlying propensity for choosing or being allowed to play violent video games, these relationships vanished, became inverse, or were reduced to trivial effect sizes. These results offer further support to the conclusion that video game violence is not a meaningful predictor of youth violence and, instead, support the conclusion that family and social variables are more influential factors.

33 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Results indicate that bullying victimization, fighting, substance use, sexual behavior, depression, and unhealthy dieting behaviors were generally associated with NSSI and suicidal ideation and some effects significantly differed based on gender and orientation.
Abstract: BACKGROUND: Researchhas suggested that sexual minority youth are more likely to experience a number of behavioral and health-related risk factors due to their exposure to negative attitudes and beliefs about sexual minorities. Few studies, however, have examined the prevalence of non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) among sexual minority youth. With self-cutting and suicidal ideation common in middle and high schools, understanding the antecedents and correlates of such behaviormay help identify troubled students and initiate preventative measures. METHODS: Bivariate probit regression analyses are performed using data from 7,326 high school students collected via the Delaware Youth Risk Behavior Survey. RESULTS: Results indicate that bullying victimization, fighting, substance use, sexual behavior, depression, and unhealthy dieting behaviors were generally associated with NSSI and suicidal ideation. Some effects - including those from sexual activity, substance use, and unhealthy dieting behaviors - significantly differed based on gender and orientation. CONCLUSIONS: Risk factors for suicide and NSSI vary by gender and orientation. Both prevention/intervention specialists and researchers should consider the intersection of these risk factors with sexual orientation in their efforts. Language: en

29 citations


Cited by
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TL;DR: In this article, the secret to improve the quality of life by reading this group-based modeling of development is found, which is a kind of book that you need now, and it can be your favorite book to read after having this book.
Abstract: Find the secret to improve the quality of life by reading this group based modeling of development. This is a kind of book that you need now. Besides, it can be your favorite book to read after having this book. Do you ask why? Well, this is a book that has different characteristic with others. You may not need to know who the author is, how well-known the work is. As wise word, never judge the words from who speaks, but make the words as your good value to your life.

864 citations

01 Oct 1965

376 citations

Journal ArticleDOI

204 citations

Journal Article
TL;DR: In this article, the authors analyzed factors associated with the use of mental health services by homeless adults. But the majority had not made an outpatient mental health visit in 5 years and used alcohol and drugs the most.
Abstract: As part of a community-based survey of 529 homeless adults, the authors analyzed factors associated with their use of mental health services. Homeless persons who had had a previous psychiatric hospitalization were the least likely to sleep in an emergency shelter, had been homeless nearly twice as long as the rest of the sample, had the worst mental health status, used alcohol and drugs the most, and were the most involved in criminal activities. The majority had not made an outpatient mental health visit in 5 years. It is suggested that diverse systems of care are needed for homeless persons.

195 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Examination of connectedness among 224 youth recruited from an urban medical emergency department, who were at elevated risk due to bullying perpetration or victimization, or low social connectedness, suggests that family and school connectedness may buffer youth on a trajectory of risk, and may therefore be important potential targets for early intervention services.

175 citations