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Wilfried Loth

Bio: Wilfried Loth is an academic researcher from University of Duisburg-Essen. The author has contributed to research in topics: European union & Politics. The author has an hindex of 14, co-authored 68 publications receiving 556 citations.


Papers
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Book
01 Jan 1982
TL;DR: The struggle for European Union by political parties and pressure groups in Western European countries 1945-1950 as mentioned in this paper, see Section 3.3.1] and Section 4.1.2
Abstract: 3. The struggle for European Union by political parties and pressure groups in Western European countries 1945-1950

68 citations

Book
11 Sep 2015
TL;DR: The history of the European Union, from Winston Churchill to Jean-Claude Juncker, is described by Steininger and Verheugen as discussed by the authors, who call it "an enlightening work".
Abstract: This is a standard work on the history of the European Union: Initiatives, disputes, and successes, from Winston Churchill to Angela Merkel and Jean-Claude Juncker. "An enlightening work. Required reading for all who doubt the unfinished history of Europe". (Rolf Steininger, Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung). "A brilliant work". (Gunter Verheugen, German EU-Commissioner 1999-2009).

38 citations

Book
01 Jan 1988
TL;DR: This paper argued that neither "Soviet Expansionism" nor "American Imperialism" can be seen as the central factor of the Cold War, arguing that neither of them is relevant to the present day.
Abstract: This book should be of interest to students of twentieth century history from introductory to research level. The text argues that neither "Soviet Expansionism" nor "American Imperialism" can be seen as the central factor of the Cold War.

25 citations


Cited by
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Book
31 Aug 2009
TL;DR: Simmons as mentioned in this paper argues that international human rights law has made a positive contribution to the realization of human rights in much of the world, focusing on rights stakeholders rather than United Nations or state pressure, and demonstrates through a combination of statistical analyses and case studies that the ratification of treaties leads to better rights practices on average.
Abstract: This volume argues that international human rights law has made a positive contribution to the realization of human rights in much of the world. Although governments sometimes ratify human rights treaties, gambling that they will experience little pressure to comply with them, this is not typically the case. Focusing on rights stakeholders rather than the United Nations or state pressure, Beth Simmons demonstrates through a combination of statistical analyses and case studies that the ratification of treaties leads to better rights practices on average. Simmons argues that international human rights law should get more practical and rhetorical support from the international community as a supplement to broader efforts to address conflict, development, and democratization.

1,136 citations

Posted Content
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors exploit the division of Germany after the Second World War and the reunification of East and West Germany in 1990 as a natural experiment to provide evidence of the importance of market access for economic development.
Abstract: This paper exploits the division of Germany after the Second World War and the reunification of East and West Germany in 1990 as a natural experiment to provide evidence of the importance of market access for economic development. In line with a standard new economic geography model, we find that following division cities in West Germany that were close to the new border between East and West Germany experienced a substantial decline in population growth relative to other West German cities. We provide several pieces of evidence that the decline of the border cities can be entirely accounted for by their loss in market access and is neither driven by differences in industrial structure nor differences in the degree of war related destruction. Finally, we also find some first evidence of a recovery of the border cities after the reunification of East and West Germany.

491 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors exploit the division of Germany after the Second World War and the reunification of East and West Germany in 1990 as a natural experiment to provide evidence for the importance of market access for economic development.
Abstract: This paper exploits the division of Germany after the Second World War and the reunification of East and West Germany in 1990 as a natural experiment to provide evidence for the importance of market access for economic development. In line with a standard new economic geography model, we find that following division cities in West Germany close to the East-West German border experienced a substantial decline in population growth relative to other West German cities. We show that the model can account for the quantitative magnitude of our findings and provide additional evidence against alternative possible explanations. (JEL F15, N94, O18)

344 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, a macropolitical approach using overall aggregate data is taken to explain the evolution of the EU, using five indicators: binding outputs, scope enlargement of public policies, transfer of competencies, institutional growth and procedural differentiation; and involvement of intermediary groups in channels of influence.
Abstract: To explain the evolution of the EU, a macropolitical approach using overall aggregate data is taken. Four dynamic views are tested: the neofunctional/neofederal assumption of linear growth; the realist view of decline; the governance/pendulum view of cyclical up and down; and the fusion thesis view of structural growth and differentiation. The article uses five indicators: binding outputs; scope enlargement of public policies; transfer of competencies; institutional growth and procedural differentiation; and involvement of intermediary groups in channels of influence. The data point to trends of merging public resources at several state levels, leading to increasing complexities, a lack of transparency and difficulties in reversing the development. This ever closer fusion is explained as a dynamic product of rational strategies of European welfare states faced with growing interdependencies and spillovers, furthered by the institutional logics of EU bodies. Criticized for the lack of legitimacy and the entailing of national democratic constitutions, this new polity may be perceived as a new stage in the evolution of European state and—more open to critical debate—a novel form of representative government.

337 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors compare realist, federalist, neo-functionalist and functionalist approaches to analyse and assess the evolution of the EU's administrative infrastructure, and compare the behavioural patterns within committees.
Abstract: Studying the administrative infrastructure of the EU is an intriguing affair. Comitology committees, in particular, are significant indicators for analysing and assessing the evolution of the EU's administrative system. Relevant integration-related theories, however, offer several diverging analyses and assessments of their function and significance. Some of the existing empirical data denote considerable growth in administrative participation and a significant differentiation of procedures and forms, indicating a considerable Europeanization of national administrations. Insights into the behavioural patterns within committees indicate an interactive style in which the fundamental constitutional issues and the exact legal form are controversial, but where daily routine is characterized by business-like workings based on technocratic expertise and camaraderie, and geared to consensus among civil servants from several levels. Comparing realist, federalist, neo-functionalist and functionalist approaches, as ...

199 citations