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William J. Coffey

Bio: William J. Coffey is an academic researcher from Université de Montréal. The author has contributed to research in topics: Metropolitan area & Service (business). The author has an hindex of 22, co-authored 44 publications receiving 1662 citations. Previous affiliations of William J. Coffey include Université du Québec à Montréal.

Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors examined the role of high-order services in the creation of the evolving multinucleated metropolitan structure and found evidence of central business district (CBD) decline in relative, but not absolute, terms.
Abstract: Much of the recent urban literature on suburban employment centres has neglected the role of high-order services, perhaps the principal component of 'edge cities', in the creation of the evolving multinucleated metropolitan structure. This paper specifically explores the role of high-order services in this process. We use employment by place-of-work data at the census-tract level to examine the changing intrametropolitan geography of employment in four finance, insurance and real estate (FIRE) services and eight business services in the Montreal area over the period 1981-96. We find evidence of central business district (CBD) decline in relative, but not absolute, terms. The resulting decentralisation has clearly assumed the form of polycentricity rather than of generalised dispersion. In spite of recent advances in telecommunications technologies, agglomeration economies continue to exert an important impact upon intrametropolitan location.

161 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A growing number of studies examine in detail the spatial structure of particular m... as mentioned in this paper have examined the spatial structures of economic activity in particular intrametropolitan locations in the US.
Abstract: Since the late 1980s there has been considerable interest in the intrametropolitan location of economic activity. A growing number of studies examine in detail the spatial structure of particular m...

122 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The increasing importance of the service sector in modern economies necessitates the elaboration of a body of location theory applicable to service activities as mentioned in this paper, and an attempt is made in this paper to p...
Abstract: The increasing importance of the service sector in modern economies necessitates the elaboration of a body of location theory applicable to service activities. An attempt is made in this paper to p...

106 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors explore the conceptual linkages between the growth and the location of producer services, and the rise of flexible forms of production, on the other hand, and explore the labor force effect of flexibility in the production and use of produce services.
Abstract: While the flexible production literature has become increasingly abundant in recent years, the vast majority of it is narrowly restricted to manufacturing activities, entirely ignoring the role that producer services play in modern systems of production. This paper attempts to explore the conceptual linkages between the growth and the location of producer services, on the one hand, and the rise of flexible forms of production, on the other. After a brief summary of the flexible production approach, the factors underlying the growth and the increasing externalization of producer services are examined. The appropriateness of employing a flexible production framework in the case of producer services, and the significance of flexible production for understanding the location of producer services are then explored. Finally, the labor force effect of flexibility in the production and use of producer services is considered.

101 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors present the GEOGRAPHIA of PRODUCER Services, which is a collection of resources for the development of urban geographies, including:
Abstract: (2000). THE GEOGRAPHIES OF PRODUCER SERVICES. Urban Geography: Vol. 21, No. 2, pp. 170-183.

93 citations


Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors examine the geographic sources of innovation, focusing specifically on the relationship between product innovation and the underlying "technological infrastructure" of particular places, which is comprised of agglomerations of firms in related manufacturing industries, geographic concentrations of industrial R&D, concentrations of university R &D, and business-service firms.
Abstract: The fate of regions and of nations increasingly depends upon ideas and innovations to facilitate growth. In recent years, geographers have made fundamental contributions to our understanding of the innovation process by exploring the diffusion of innovation, the location of R&D, and the geography of high-technology industry. This paper examines the geographic sources of innovation, focusing specifically on the relationship between product innovation and the underlying “technological infrastructure” of particular places. This infrastructure is comprised of agglomerations of firms in related manufacturing industries, geographic concentrations of industrial R&D, concentrations of university R&D, and business-service firms. Once in place, these geographic concentrations of infrastructure enhance the capacity for innovation, as regions come to specialize in particular technologies and industrial sectors. Geography organizes this infrastructure by bringing together the crucial resources and inputs for ...

747 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors argue that the word counterurbanization is too broad to cover its depth of meaning and propose adoption of three concepts to describe the changing spatial redistribution of population: counterurban, counterurbanizing, and counterurbanisation.

341 citations

Book
01 Oct 1993
TL;DR: The origins of urbanization and the characteristics of cities urbanization in the United States the metropolitan period in United States -1920 to 1960 the restructuring of settlement space - 1960 to 1990 the rise of urban sociology contemporary urban sociology - the socio-spatial perspective people, lifestyles and the metropolis neighbourhoods, the public environment and theories of urban life metropolitan problems - poverty, racism, crime, housing and fiscal crisis local politics - city and suburban governments third world urbanization urbanization.
Abstract: The new urban sociology the origins of urbanization and the characteristics of cities urbanization in the United States the metropolitan period in the United States - 1920 to 1960 the restructuring of settlement space - 1960 to 1990 the rise of urban sociology contemporary urban sociology - the socio-spatial perspective people, lifestyles and the metropolis neighbourhoods, the public environment and theories of urban life metropolitan problems - poverty, racism, crime, housing and fiscal crisis local politics - city and suburban governments third world urbanization urbanization in the industrialized world - Western and Eastern Europe and Japan environmental issues and metropolitan planning metropolitan social policy.

338 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors used an innovation production fi- tion to relate the presence of geographically-mediated knowledge resources to the innovative activity of small and large firms and found that small firm innovation appears to benefit from external institutions and resources.
Abstract: This paper uses an innovation production fi.mc- tion to relate the presence of geographically-mediated com- plementary knowledge resources to the innovative activity of small and large firms. The empirical results suggest that small firm innovation appears to benefit from the presence of external institutions and resources. Although large firm innovative activity benefits from the presence of knowledge resources, location appears to be especially beneficial to small firm innovative activity.

309 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors show that the elevated value effects of transit access are well documented and that it is now time for transit/land-use research to move from hypothesis testing to practical applications of value capture.
Abstract: . Much of the literature on value capture reports empirical findings on the incidence of rising land values related to distance from a transit stop following the installation of rail transit improvements. This annotated bibliography shows that the elevated value effects of transit access are well documented. The authors maintain that it is now time for transit/land-use research to move from hypothesis testing to practical applications of value capture. Longitudinal models can help predict land-value increments over a period of time, yielding estimates of the total capturable revenues that would support the debt financing of transit improvement projects.

252 citations