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Author

William Labov

Other affiliations: Columbia University
Bio: William Labov is an academic researcher from University of Pennsylvania. The author has contributed to research in topics: Sound change & North American English. The author has an hindex of 57, co-authored 133 publications receiving 26934 citations. Previous affiliations of William Labov include Columbia University.


Papers
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Book
01 Jan 1966
TL;DR: This article studied the social stratification of English in New York City department stores and the isolation of contextual style in the context of the lower east side of Manhattan, and the structure of the New York city vowel system.
Abstract: Part I. Problems and Methods of Analysis: 1. The study of language in its social context 2. First approach to the structure of New York City English 3. The social stratification of English in New York City department stores 4. The isolation of contextual style 5. The linguistic interview 6. The survey of the lower east side Part II. Social Differentiation: 7. Class differentiation of the variables 8. Further analysis of the variables 9. Distribution of the variables in apparent time 10. Other linguistic variables Part III. Social Evaluation: 11. Subjective evaluation of the variables 12. Self-evaluation and linguistic security 13. General attitudes towards the speech of New York City Part IV. Synthesis: 14. The structure of the New York City vowel system.

2,837 citations

Book
01 Jan 1972
TL;DR: In this paper, some sources of reading problems for speakers of the Black English Vernacular are discussed, such as negative attraction and negative conjunctive reading, and the relation of reading failure to peer-group status.
Abstract: Figures Tables Introduction PART I- THE STRUCTURE OF THE BLACK ENGLISH VERNACULAR 1- Some Sources of Reading Problems for Speakers of the Black English Vernacular 2- Is the Black English Vernacular a Separate System? 3- Contraction, Deletion, and Inherent Variability of the English Copula 4- Negative Attraction and Negative Concord PART II- THE VERNACULAR IN ITS SOCIAL SETTING 5- The Logic of Nonstandard English 6- The Relation of Reading Failure to Peer-group Status 7- The Linguistic Consequences of Being a Lame PART III THE USES OF THE BLACK ENGLISH VERNACULAR 8- Rules for Ritual Insults 9- The Transformation of Experience in Narrative Syntax Bibliography Index

2,089 citations

Book
01 Jan 1994

1,732 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
01 Jan 1963-WORD
TL;DR: The authors discuss dialect mixture, obsolescence and replacement, and show a very keen concern with the social mechanism of linguistic change, and include pejorativeracial terms in their discussion of dialect mixture.
Abstract: graphyand settlementhistory of Texas.His inclusionof pejorativeracial terms is a very valuable contribution. His discussion of dialect mixture, obsolescenceand replacement, shows a very keen concern with the social mechanism of linguistic change. The many students of American English who will use these materials must feel a very real senseof obligation towards the author for these advances,as well as for his successin ■tting this very large piece of the American puzzle into place.

1,394 citations


Cited by
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Book
01 Jan 1980
TL;DR: In this article, the context of educational research, planning educational research and the styles of education research are discussed, along with strategies and instruments for data collection and research for data analysis.
Abstract: Part One: The Context Of Educational Research Part Two: Planning Educational Research Part Three: Styles Of Educational Research Part Four: Strategies And Instruments For Data Collection And Researching Part Five: Data Analysis

21,163 citations

Journal Article
TL;DR: The authors examines five common misunderstandings about case-study research and concludes with the Kuhnian insight that a scientific discipline without a large number of thoroughly executed case studies is a discipline without systematic production of exemplars.
Abstract: This article examines five common misunderstandings about case-study research: (1) Theoretical knowledge is more valuable than practical knowledge; (2) One cannot generalize from a single case, therefore the single case study cannot contribute to scientific development; (3) The case study is most useful for generating hypotheses, while other methods are more suitable for hypotheses testing and theory building; (4) The case study contains a bias toward verification; and (5) It is often difficult to summarize specific case studies. The article explains and corrects these misunderstandings one by one and concludes with the Kuhnian insight that a scientific discipline without a large number of thoroughly executed case studies is a discipline without systematic production of exemplars, and that a discipline without exemplars is an ineffective one. Social science may be strengthened by the execution of more good case studies.

10,177 citations

01 Jan 1987
TL;DR: Gumperz as discussed by the authors discusses politeness strategies in language and their implications for language studies, including sociological implications and implications for social sciences. But he does not discuss the relationship between politeness and language.
Abstract: Symbols and abbreviations Foreword John J. Gumperz Introduction to the reissue Notes 1. Introduction 2. Summarized argument 3. The argument: intuitive bases and derivative definitions 4. On the nature of the model 5. Realizations of politeness strategies in language 6. Derivative hypotheses 7. Sociological implications 8. Implications for language studies 9. Conclusions Notes References Author index Subject index.

9,542 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors examines five common misunderstandings about case-study research: theoretical knowledge is more valuable than practical knowledge, one cannot generalize from a single case, therefore, the single-case study cannot contribute to scientific development, the case study is most useful for generating hypotheses, whereas other methods are more suitable for hypotheses testing and theory building, case study contains a bias toward verification, and it is often difficult to summarize specific case studies.
Abstract: This article examines five common misunderstandings about case-study research: (a) theoretical knowledge is more valuable than practical knowledge; (b) one cannot generalize from a single case, therefore, the single-case study cannot contribute to scientific development; (c) the case study is most useful for generating hypotheses, whereas other methods are more suitable for hypotheses testing and theory building; (d) the case study contains a bias toward verification; and (e) it is often difficult to summarize specific case studies. This article explains and corrects these misunderstandings one by one and concludes with the Kuhnian insight that a scientific discipline without a large number of thoroughly executed case studies is a discipline without systematic production of exemplars, and a discipline without exemplars is an ineffective one. Social science may be strengthened by the execution of a greater number of good case studies.

8,876 citations