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Wilson O. Clough

Bio: Wilson O. Clough is an academic researcher. The author has contributed to research in topics: Cultural analysis & Frontier. The author has an hindex of 4, co-authored 6 publications receiving 62 citations.

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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Remington, Wister, and Wister as mentioned in this paper described the formation of an Eastern Establishment and the Western Experience, 1835-1885, and the Rough Riders: Regiment of True Americans.
Abstract: Preface Preface to the Paperback Edition Introduction Part I: The East 1. The Formation of an Eastern Establishment 2. Easterners and the Western Experience, 1835-1885 3. Remington, Roosevelt, Wister: The East and Adolescence Part II: The West 4. Roosevelt's West: The Beat of Hardy Life 5. Remington's West: Men with the Bark On 6. Wister's West: The Cowboy as Cultural Hero Part III: East and West in the Decade of Consensus 7. The Rough Riders: Regiment of True Americans 8. Technocracy and Arcadia: Conservation under Roosevelt 9. Remington, Roosevelt, Wister: Consensus and the West References Index

35 citations


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01 Jan 2015
TL;DR: In the early 1960s, the John Birch Society, a staunchly anticommunist organization founded in 1958 by retired businessman Robert H.W. Welch, became a hotbed of anti-communism in Southern California as discussed by the authors.
Abstract: OF DISSERTATION SAVE OUR REPUBLIC: BATTLING JOHN BIRCH IN CALIFORNIA’S CONSERVATIVE CRADLE Previous accounts of the development of the New American Right have demonstrated the popularity and resonance of the ideology in Southern California. However, these studies have not shown how contention surrounded conservatism’s ascendancy even in regions where it found eager disciples. “Save Our Republic” uses one conservative Southern California community as a vehicle to better understand the foundations of a wider movement and argues the growth of conservatism was not nearly as smooth as earlier studies have suggested. Santa Barbara, California, experienced a much more contentious introduction to the same conservative elements and exemplifies the larger ideological clash that occurred nationwide during the late 1950s and early 1960s between “establishment,” moderate Republicans and the party’s right flank. In California’s cradle of conservatism, the ideology’s birth was not an easy one. Santa Barbara should have provided a bonanza of support for the John Birch Society, a staunchly anticommunist organization founded in 1958 by retired businessman Robert H.W. Welch. Instead, its presence there in the early 1960s divided the city and inspired the sort of suspicion that ultimately hobbled the group’s reputation nationally. Rather than thriving in the city, the JBS impaled itself in a series of self-inflicted wounds that only worsened the effect these characterizations had on the group’s national reputation. Disseminated to a nationwide audience by local newspaper publisher Thomas M. Storke, who declared his intention to banish the organization from the city, the events that occurred in Santa Barbara throughout 1961 alerted other cities of the potential disruption the JBS could inspire in their communities. The JBS would forever bear the battle scars it earned in Santa Barbara. “Save Our Republic” argues the events in Santa Barbara exemplify the more pronounced political battle that was occurring throughout the nation in the 1960s as conservatives grappled to determine the bounds of their ideology. The threat from the right that caused so much handwringing in the halls of conservative power had an equally unsettling effect in the city’s parlors, churches, schoolhouses and newsrooms.

84 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, the absence of Asian bodies on US stages resulted in actors developing what Josephine Lee calls "a complex set of codes for the presentation of the Oriental Other" that borrowed from the lexicon of Asian stereotypes.
Abstract: In the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, the absence of Asian bodies on US stages resulted in actors developing what Josephine Lee calls "a complex set of codes for the presentation of the Oriental Other" that borrowed from the lexicon of Asian stereotypes.1 I group such codes?conventional associations of signs and meanings that purportedly convey "Asian-ness"?under the term yellowface performance. Actors in yellowface, such as Luise Rainer in the film The Good Earth, David Carradine in the television series Kung Pu, and Jonathan Pryce in the musical Miss Saigon have sparked debates about the production of Asian representations in dominant media.2 But the relative obscurity of nineteenth-century yellowface performers impedes contextualization of these disputes. This article excavates some of this history by sifting through extant records concerning the white actor Charles Parsloe during the 1870s.3 Because of the popularity of his "Chinamen" (a term I self-consciously invoke as a counterpoint to the lived experience of Chinese men), Parsloe provides the most comprehensive case study available with which to examine early yellowface practice. As a popular performer, his embodiment of the Chinaman both depends on and

77 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the relative importance of material and ideal factors for social action in philosophy and social theory has been discussed, and the importance of idealism in both actor-oriented (that is, phenomenologist, ethnomethodologist, symbolic interactionist) and structure-oriented theorists has been examined.
Abstract: Perhaps the most vexing problem in philosophy and social theory concerns the relative importance of material and ideal factors for social action. Karl Marx, for instance, with his notion of base and superstructure and his materialistic interpretation of the dialectic process, made a clean break from the idealism of his Hegelian heritage (McLellan 1977:390; Swingewood 1991:62–63). Nevertheless, idealism proved resilient and later came to inform the thinking of both actor-oriented (that is, phenomenologist, ethnomethodologist, symbolic interactionist) and structure-oriented (that is Functionalist, Structuralist) theorists.

65 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors reviewed the 1980s plans for six cities: Cleveland, Denver, Philadelphia, Portland, San Francisco, and Seattle, concluding that Toronto's 1991 plan is a model for the future.
Abstract: Central cities have experienced uneven development, with great attention paid to their downtowns and allocation of resources made accordingly in attempts to revitalize central business districts. Downtown plans have paid too little attention to citywide social problems and the role of the CBD in their amelioration. Social equity concerns should be seriously addressed in downtown plans. In this article 1980s plans are reviewed for six cities: Cleveland, Denver, Philadelphia, Portland, San Francisco, and Seattle. The analysis concludes with the suggestion that Toronto's 1991 plan is a model for the future.

53 citations